Re: Cleaning a damaged drive

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Slamadatan, Oct 27, 2003.

  1. Slamadatan

    Slamadatan Guest

    "Rod Speed" <> wrote in message
    news:bnil1b$11b1fi$-berlin.de...
    >
    > Slamadatan <> wrote in message
    > news:3f9cc7e1$0$23615$...
    >
    > > I've got a pretty badly damaged harddrive which I can't salvage
    > > anything off or even reformat or zeroise. I can see it in BIOS,
    > > POST and System devices, but it's unaccessible beyond that.
    > > It's under warranty and I've got an RMA authorised, but was just
    > > wondering if there's anything I can do to protect the data on it.

    >
    > Thats always been the big downside with waiting
    > until the drive dies until considering that problem.
    >
    > The only effective approach is solidly secure
    > encryption of what matters before the drive dies.


    Fair point. All the important stuff has been backed up, and in all honesty
    there isn't anything that dangerous on there that necessitated encryption.

    > > There's nothing on it that's gonna bring down a government,
    > > but it does contain a pretty extensive MP3 collection (not
    > > all of which can be found in my CD collection)

    >
    > You wont be getting a visit from large footed fellas
    > who will be frog marching you off to the nearest jail.


    Here's hoping. Word is that Madonna get's pretty narcky about such stuff,
    but then she's not got particularly large feet...

    > > and a heap of business and personal documents.

    >
    > The most that might happens is someone gets
    > a bit of amusement at the more salacious stuff,
    > like you getting your rocks off with goats etc.


    Bah. More embarrassing for the goats, than me...

    > > Can anyone recommend an erase or format utility that
    > > will ensure my damaged drive isn't readable by some
    > > bored harddrive tech after I return it to the manufacturers?

    >
    > Not possible if the drive cant be accessed.


    Ah, but is it reasonably possible for the bored tech? Will he likely have
    enough time and compulsion to start sniffing around? That is the hundred
    thousand dollar (hypothetical) question.

    > You've basically got to decide if you care enough about the
    > unprotected data to give up on the RMA and just buy a new drive.


    I paid over $200 bucks for it! I guess I'll risk that against the tens of
    thousands I could lose in corporate theft and ARIA fines...
    Slamadatan, Oct 27, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Slamadatan

    Rod Speed Guest

    "Slamadatan" <> wrote in message news:3f9cd9a0$0$23606$...
    > "Rod Speed" <> wrote in message
    > news:bnil1b$11b1fi$-berlin.de...
    > >
    > > Slamadatan <> wrote in message
    > > news:3f9cc7e1$0$23615$...
    > >
    > > > I've got a pretty badly damaged harddrive which I can't salvage
    > > > anything off or even reformat or zeroise. I can see it in BIOS,
    > > > POST and System devices, but it's unaccessible beyond that.
    > > > It's under warranty and I've got an RMA authorised, but was just
    > > > wondering if there's anything I can do to protect the data on it.

    > >
    > > Thats always been the big downside with waiting
    > > until the drive dies until considering that problem.
    > >
    > > The only effective approach is solidly secure
    > > encryption of what matters before the drive dies.

    >
    > Fair point. All the important stuff has been backed up, and in all honesty
    > there isn't anything that dangerous on there that necessitated encryption.
    >
    > > > There's nothing on it that's gonna bring down a government,
    > > > but it does contain a pretty extensive MP3 collection (not
    > > > all of which can be found in my CD collection)

    > >
    > > You wont be getting a visit from large footed fellas
    > > who will be frog marching you off to the nearest jail.

    >
    > Here's hoping. Word is that Madonna get's pretty narcky about such stuff,
    > but then she's not got particularly large feet...
    >
    > > > and a heap of business and personal documents.

    > >
    > > The most that might happens is someone gets
    > > a bit of amusement at the more salacious stuff,
    > > like you getting your rocks off with goats etc.

    >
    > Bah. More embarrassing for the goats, than me...
    >
    > > > Can anyone recommend an erase or format utility that
    > > > will ensure my damaged drive isn't readable by some
    > > > bored harddrive tech after I return it to the manufacturers?

    > >
    > > Not possible if the drive cant be accessed.


    > Ah, but is it reasonably possible for the bored tech?


    Yes, if the drive has just had the logic card die, most
    drives can just have a new logic card added and then
    the tech can cream his jeans till the cows come home.

    > Will he likely have enough time and
    > compulsion to start sniffing around?


    Very unlikely unless he can see something obviously titillating etc.

    > That is the hundred thousand dollar (hypothetical) question.


    It does happen in some circumstances, particularly with porn.

    >> You've basically got to decide if you care enough about the
    >> unprotected data to give up on the RMA and just buy a new drive.


    > I paid over $200 bucks for it! I guess I'll risk that against the
    > tens of thousands I could lose in corporate theft and ARIA fines...


    Yeah, the risk is microscopic. Even the stupidest monkey
    will realise that if he does start looting your corporate
    accounts that he'd be the first to be suspected.

    You could trawl the web for pics of your nefarious
    activitys with those poor goats tho. He'll likely decide
    that you wouldnt be game to say anything about them.
    Rod Speed, Oct 27, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Slamadatan

    Slamadatan Guest

    "Rod Speed" <> wrote in message
    news:bnipgg$11av3j$-berlin.de...
    > > > > Can anyone recommend an erase or format utility that
    > > > > will ensure my damaged drive isn't readable by some
    > > > > bored harddrive tech after I return it to the manufacturers?
    > > >
    > > > Not possible if the drive cant be accessed.

    >
    > > Ah, but is it reasonably possible for the bored tech?

    >
    > Yes, if the drive has just had the logic card die, most
    > drives can just have a new logic card added and then
    > the tech can cream his jeans till the cows come home.


    Any online sources of information regarding such a logic card transplant?
    Assuming I get get my hands on an identical drive, is it possible to trasfer
    the logic card over (and back again) or must it take place in a clean room?
    I'm handy with a soldering iron and a set of tech screw drivers, but
    anything much more complicated might be difficult.
    Slamadatan, Oct 27, 2003
    #3
  4. Slamadatan

    Rod Speed Guest

    Slamadatan <> wrote in message
    news:3f9cf638$0$23586$...
    > Rod Speed <> wrote


    >>>>> Can anyone recommend an erase or format utility that
    >>>>> will ensure my damaged drive isn't readable by some
    >>>>> bored harddrive tech after I return it to the manufacturers?


    >>>> Not possible if the drive cant be accessed.


    >>> Ah, but is it reasonably possible for the bored tech?


    >> Yes, if the drive has just had the logic card die, most
    >> drives can just have a new logic card added and then
    >> the tech can cream his jeans till the cows come home.


    > Any online sources of information regarding such a logic card transplant?


    There's a bit around, but its so obvious that I
    havent bothered to keep track of what's around.

    > Assuming I get get my hands on an identical drive, is it
    > possible to trasfer the logic card over (and back again)


    Yes, its always possible. It can be a bit less than obvious
    how to do it with some drives, particularly older quantum
    drives where its not immediately obvious how to get the
    flexible printed circuit board cable that goes to the heads
    out of the connector it connects to on the logic card, but
    once its been explained, you'll kick yourself its so easy.

    > or must it take place in a clean room?


    Nope.

    > I'm handy with a soldering iron and a set of tech screw drivers,


    You only need a screwdriver and a bit of knowledge with some drives.

    > but anything much more complicated might be difficult.


    The main trick is to ensure that the two logic cards
    are off identical drive models and ideally identical
    revision levels to maximise the chances of it working.

    And there are some drives where it doesnt work at all.
    Rod Speed, Oct 27, 2003
    #4
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. B.Al.Zeebub

    Re: Cleaning a damaged drive

    B.Al.Zeebub, Oct 27, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,431
    Rod Speed
    Oct 30, 2003
  2. hugh jass

    Re: Cleaning a damaged drive

    hugh jass, Oct 27, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    394
    Slamadatan
    Oct 27, 2003
  3. Harrison

    Re: Cleaning a damaged drive

    Harrison, Oct 27, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    373
    Harrison
    Oct 27, 2003
  4. Eric Gisin

    Re: Cleaning a damaged drive

    Eric Gisin, Oct 27, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    412
    Arno Wagner
    Oct 30, 2003
  5. Neil Maxwell

    Re: Cleaning a damaged drive

    Neil Maxwell, Oct 28, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    407
    Neil Maxwell
    Oct 28, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page