Re: Capturing your desktop as video

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Paul, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    John wrote:
    > Does anyone know how to capture your desktop as video?
    >
    > I did it many years ago using a capture card I had. I somehow managed
    > to send it out and then back into my system where I was able to record
    > whatever happened on my desktop. I think it was on an older system
    > though.
    >
    > If you know of an easy way to do this perhaps using software only
    > please let me know.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > John
    >
    >


    This page would be one place to look.

    http://www.videohelp.com/tools/sections/desktop-screen-capture

    I see three distinct areas, with respect to software capture.

    1) The desktop is a surface.

    2) The "overlay plane" used by video applications, is separate from that.
    Applications can use "overlay plane", VMR7, VMR9, as options. An
    software capture program good for (1), may not record the output
    of a video player application properly (black square syndrome).

    3) 3D games have their own output. FRAPs is an example of an application
    that records game output.

    You may not find one single software application, that is guaranteed to
    record everything. Which is why your hardware capture idea is a
    more comprehensive solution, and it isn't sensitive to the content type.

    *******

    And if you can't find a "VGA capture" solution, or one with
    pricing information, you can always try something like VGA ro YPbPr
    conversion first, and then "component capture".

    A company called BlackMagic makes a card called Intensity Pro, but the
    reviews aren't good enough to recommend it. I don't know if their
    later products do a better job or not. This is intended for capturing
    from a camera (no DRM), rather than from other sources.

    http://www.amazon.com/Blackmagic-De...r_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285032897&sr=8-1

    The dongle they sell for that card, shows what looks like component input
    capability. And the card has limited bandwidth, accepting 720p and 1080i.
    This has something to do with the Analog Devices front end chip (there
    are three versions of the chip, including support for HDCP, and they can't
    use that, without getting in legal trouble).

    http://www.amazon.com/Blackmagic-Design-Breakout-Cable-Intensity/dp/B001FAQRQ0/ref=pd_sim_e_1

    (the following is from a manual I have on disk here, and is meant to indicate
    what analog capabilities the Intensity Pro PCI Express card has...)

    "B-Y Input
    Y Input
    R-Y Input

    B-Y Output
    Y Output
    R-Y Output

    (L) Audio Input (unbalanced analog)
    (R) Audio Input (unbalanced analog)

    (L) Audio Output (unbalanced analog)
    (R) Audio Output (unbalanced analog)

    SPDIF/AES Output"

    Another company has done a card along similar lines, but
    I don't have any customer reviews for it. It's a PCI Express x4
    card. I don't even have a price (not a good sign). Maybe
    they're not competing in the Intensity Pro "space". This
    card *might* be more capable. The software they provide,
    would make all the difference between "useful" and "useless".

    http://www.ems-imaging.com/catalog/...og&file=product_info&cPath=39&products_id=117

    Older video cards, sometimes offered VIVO capability. That might include component
    output, but expecting component in, is a stretch. In this article, the best
    they seem to offer is S-video Input. And S-video Input, means your
    screen capture would be pretty crappy (text unreadable). Component
    video input, is a bare minimum for this job.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_In_Video_Out

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Component_video

    You might wonder why I've not bothered mentioning HDMI (or DVI).
    Yes, HDMI exists. It is protected by HDCP in some instances.
    I don't think the Intensity Pro does 1080p, and may do 1080i.
    I don't know how "regular" aspect ratio screens would be handled,
    or whether everything is "recorded wide". Digital rights management,
    means there is the potential for more "curve balls" in the
    software. The cards can't legally support HDCP, without
    falling afoul of DMCA. Which is why, if I was looking for a
    solution, I might just as well "go analog" (i.e. VGA).

    This adapter, takes you from VGA to component, and then
    you'd have to find a component capture device. It's about $125.
    The specs aren't very good, in that video is limited to 1024x768.
    A more expensive device might handle other resolutions.

    http://ca.startech.com/product/VGA2CPNT-VGA-to-Component-YPbPr-Video-Converter

    Blackmagic makes a USB3 version, as their newest creation. And
    the reviews show, they're still not "making a lot of friends".
    It looks like it needs an "unrestricted" USB3 implementation,
    meaning the NEC USB3 chip on the motherboard, needs its PCIe x1 Rev2
    500MB/sec lane to work. (Some are connected at 250MB/sec.)
    It's funny, that one reviewer bought an Asus U3S6 card
    (PCI Express x4 Rev1 interface), which should be unrestricted,
    and the product still didn't work.

    http://www.amazon.com/Blackmagic-De...dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1

    Maybe you'll have better luck with a search engine than I did :)

    Better start digging out that old system.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 21, 2010
    #1
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  2. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Paul wrote:
    > John wrote:
    >> Does anyone know how to capture your desktop as video?
    >>
    >> I did it many years ago using a capture card I had. I somehow managed
    >> to send it out and then back into my system where I was able to record
    >> whatever happened on my desktop. I think it was on an older system
    >> though.
    >>
    >> If you know of an easy way to do this perhaps using software only
    >> please let me know.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >>
    >> John
    >>


    It's interesting, that in the case of this capture card, the users
    are allowed to "preview" some HDMI input, but not capture it with
    the provided software. To get around that, they use FRAPS, to record
    the screen while using the card to "preview". This card is yet another
    variation on the Intensity Pro.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100049

    So perhaps FRAPS and a powerful CPU, are all you really need ?

    Maybe the capture step just isn't necessary.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 21, 2010
    #2
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  3. Paul

    Paul Guest

    John wrote:
    >> Better start digging out that old system.

    >
    >
    > Thanks Paul. I think it was a Matrox Marvel based system running win
    > 98 that I did it with.
    >
    > At the moment I am running an ancient 6 year old system with a crappy
    > Ati card. The card has a whole host of inputs and outputs and tv tuner
    > but that packed in a long time ago. I also have separate pci leadtek
    > winfast tv tuner card. It's a hybrid one with analogue and digital
    > freeview. I'm wondering if I can some how do some sort of loop back
    > type of thing using this. Will have to investigate further. Not got my
    > thinking cap on right at this moment in time.
    >
    > John
    >


    If you enable Composite video out, on your graphics card, then
    Composite video in, on a TV capture card, you *can* capture 640x480.
    But any text ends up hard to read. It makes for a pretty poor
    recording. But that is supported by more hardware. I have the
    gear to do that here (using a WinTV card for input). I don't
    have anything that can do a larger screen. If I wanted to
    capture a larger screen (like the 1280x1024 of my current desktop),
    I'd have to use a software approach, and perhaps FRAPS.

    You can try taking a video camera and recording from the screen,
    but to do something like that the right way, you need to be
    "genlocked", so you don't get a rolling bar on the recorded image
    of the screen.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 22, 2010
    #3
  4. Paul

    Ravenx

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Wiki helps you and pick up the one you like.

    If fraps slowdowns your computer and you just record onscreen activities, try this democreator.
     
    Ravenx, Sep 25, 2010
    #4
  5. Paul

    daphne

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    If you want to capture your desktop as video with high quality, you should choose the right program. The one I used can help me record movement on screen, including move the cursor, launch a program, type text, click button, select menus etc. It also can help you save the video to standard WMV video format file, so you can transfer it to your portable gadget or upload to video sharing websites.
     
    daphne, Aug 11, 2011
    #5
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