Re: Canon PowerShot G12 .CTG Modified time doesn't change

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Fri, 14 Sep 2012 16:02:41 -0400, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2012.09.14 11:29 , Mark F wrote:
    >> I recently started using a Canon PowerShot G12 camera.
    >>
    >> As per my usual practice, I periodically use a synchronization program
    >> to make sure that I have a copy of the data on the card from the
    >> camera on my computer. I set the program only check path, length,
    >> and various time fields, rather than comparing the contents of all
    >> of the files that are already present on both the disk copy and the
    >> card from the camera.

    >
    >Maybe I misunderstand you, but common practice is to move all photos
    >from the camera (or card) to the computer, verify that they are copied
    >(random sample a few phots to be sure they're okay), then delete them to
    >free up room to take more photos.


    That's my procedure. Upload, check to see if all were uploaded,
    return the SD card to the camera, and then format the SD card.

    Bridge can be set to upload and then automatically clear the SD card,
    but I don't check that box.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Sep 14, 2012
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    Mort Guest

    Alan Browne wrote:
    > On 2012.09.14 16:33 , tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Fri, 14 Sep 2012 16:02:41 -0400, Alan Browne
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2012.09.14 11:29 , Mark F wrote:
    >>>> I recently started using a Canon PowerShot G12 camera.
    >>>>
    >>>> As per my usual practice, I periodically use a synchronization program
    >>>> to make sure that I have a copy of the data on the card from the
    >>>> camera on my computer. I set the program only check path, length,
    >>>> and various time fields, rather than comparing the contents of all
    >>>> of the files that are already present on both the disk copy and the
    >>>> card from the camera.
    >>>
    >>> Maybe I misunderstand you, but common practice is to move all photos
    >>> from the camera (or card) to the computer, verify that they are copied
    >>> (random sample a few phots to be sure they're okay), then delete them to
    >>> free up room to take more photos.

    >>
    >> That's my procedure. Upload, check to see if all were uploaded,
    >> return the SD card to the camera, and then format the SD card.
    >>
    >> Bridge can be set to upload and then automatically clear the SD card,
    >> but I don't check that box.

    >
    > I don't either. When I'm satisfied with the upload, and after GPS
    > tagging has run (and the files are okay), then I manually delete them.
    >

    Hi,

    Inasmuch as a good brand name 4 GB SD card costs about $7.- and gives me
    over 400 pictures at best JPEG setting, I use the SD cards to store my
    images, in addition to hard drive. It is a cost-effective backup, and to
    date my images from back to 2004 on SD cards are still pristine. The SD
    card images might even "outlive" CD-R backups.

    Mort Linder

    USA
    Mort, Sep 15, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. tony cooper <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 14 Sep 2012 16:02:41 -0400, Alan Browne
    > <> wrote:


    >>On 2012.09.14 11:29 , Mark F wrote:
    >>> I recently started using a Canon PowerShot G12 camera.
    >>>
    >>> As per my usual practice, I periodically use a synchronization program
    >>> to make sure that I have a copy of the data on the card from the
    >>> camera on my computer. I set the program only check path, length,
    >>> and various time fields, rather than comparing the contents of all
    >>> of the files that are already present on both the disk copy and the
    >>> card from the camera.

    >>
    >>Maybe I misunderstand you, but common practice is to move all photos
    >>from the camera (or card) to the computer, verify that they are copied
    >>(random sample a few phots to be sure they're okay), then delete them to
    >>free up room to take more photos.


    > That's my procedure. Upload, check to see if all were uploaded,
    > return the SD card to the camera, and then format the SD card.


    But then you only have one copy of your photographs. What if your hard
    drive died?

    I keep the images on my SD card until I've done a preliminary scan,
    junk, and edit, of the computer upload. Then I copy all the computer
    files (which still includes the original unedited versions) to my
    backup remote hard drive. Then I have two copies on two hard drives
    and can (more) safely format the SD card in the camera.

    --
    Chris Malcolm
    Chris Malcolm, Sep 15, 2012
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 15 Sep 2012 10:51:44 -0400, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2012.09.15 06:44 , Chris Malcolm wrote:
    >> tony cooper <> wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 14 Sep 2012 16:02:41 -0400, Alan Browne
    >>> <> wrote:

    >>
    >>>> On 2012.09.14 11:29 , Mark F wrote:
    >>>>> I recently started using a Canon PowerShot G12 camera.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> As per my usual practice, I periodically use a synchronization program
    >>>>> to make sure that I have a copy of the data on the card from the
    >>>>> camera on my computer. I set the program only check path, length,
    >>>>> and various time fields, rather than comparing the contents of all
    >>>>> of the files that are already present on both the disk copy and the
    >>>>> card from the camera.
    >>>>
    >>>> Maybe I misunderstand you, but common practice is to move all photos
    >>> >from the camera (or card) to the computer, verify that they are copied
    >>>> (random sample a few phots to be sure they're okay), then delete them to
    >>>> free up room to take more photos.

    >>
    >>> That's my procedure. Upload, check to see if all were uploaded,
    >>> return the SD card to the camera, and then format the SD card.

    >>
    >> But then you only have one copy of your photographs. What if your hard
    >> drive died?
    >>
    >> I keep the images on my SD card until I've done a preliminary scan,
    >> junk, and edit, of the computer upload. Then I copy all the computer
    >> files (which still includes the original unedited versions) to my
    >> backup remote hard drive. Then I have two copies on two hard drives
    >> and can (more) safely format the SD card in the camera.

    >
    >I just check the HD version is good then delete the card photos. I
    >don't reformat unless I'm experiencing issues (very rare).


    My Nikon has a setting to "format" the SD card instead of deleting one
    or all of the photos.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Sep 15, 2012
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    Bruce Guest

    Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2012-09-15 03:44:50 -0700, Chris Malcolm <> said:
    >
    >> tony cooper <> wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 14 Sep 2012 16:02:41 -0400, Alan Browne
    >>> <> wrote:

    >>
    >>>> On 2012.09.14 11:29 , Mark F wrote:
    >>>>> I recently started using a Canon PowerShot G12 camera.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> As per my usual practice, I periodically use a synchronization program
    >>>>> to make sure that I have a copy of the data on the card from the
    >>>>> camera on my computer. I set the program only check path, length,
    >>>>> and various time fields, rather than comparing the contents of all
    >>>>> of the files that are already present on both the disk copy and the
    >>>>> card from the camera.
    >>>>
    >>>> Maybe I misunderstand you, but common practice is to move all photos
    >>>> from the camera (or card) to the computer, verify that they are copied
    >>>> (random sample a few phots to be sure they're okay), then delete them to
    >>>> free up room to take more photos.

    >>
    >>> That's my procedure. Upload, check to see if all were uploaded,
    >>> return the SD card to the camera, and then format the SD card.

    >>
    >> But then you only have one copy of your photographs. What if your hard
    >> drive died?
    >>
    >> I keep the images on my SD card until I've done a preliminary scan,
    >> junk, and edit, of the computer upload. Then I copy all the computer
    >> files (which still includes the original unedited versions) to my
    >> backup remote hard drive. Then I have two copies on two hard drives
    >> and can (more) safely format the SD card in the camera.

    >
    >Triple redundancy. That is what I do even when I am on the road.
    >
    >At home it is Tx from card to computer, from computer to outboard hard
    >drives, one of which is a 3TB RAID and one a Firewire 1TB OWC Mercury
    >On-the-go portable.
    >< http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/firewire/on-the-go >
    >
    >On the road I use a 250GB Colorspace UDMA for immediate in field back up.
    >< http://www.hypershop.com/HyperDrive-COLORSPACE-UDMA-s/64.htm >
    > Then at my leisure to my MacBook Pro and a 1TB or other size OWC
    >firewire HD, I have 6 of those 2x 1TB, 1x 750GB, 2x 500GB, and 1x 360GB.



    Your triple redundancy gives you far better protection than most
    people have. However, what protection do you have against fire?

    My insurance company insisted I implement a number of measures to
    reduce my overall risk, and theirs. The system we finally came up
    with (together) works as follows:

    In the field, back up from flash memory card to a notebook computer
    and to a portable hard drive.

    On returning to base, write to two separate hard drives (internal and
    external) and back up to the Cloud and two long life CDs. Store CDs
    in "fireproof" safe with external hard drive. Check all CDs every 3
    months for read errors.

    As one of my clients is in the data storage business, I get extremely
    low rates for cloud storage as long as I don't need instant retrieval.
    Retrieval normally takes up to 5 hours. I can get instant retrieval
    but only at a high price per job. Annual charge to me is less than
    $160 a year for all my files as long as I don't need instant
    retrieval, and I saved at least that on my insurance costs.
    Bruce, Sep 15, 2012
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    David Taylor Guest

    On 16/09/2012 00:36, Eric Stevens wrote:
    []
    > I understand it is adviseable to reformat periodically. Otherwise
    > there is a risk that continuous writing and erasing will leave patches
    > of inaccessible card.


    As the lifetime (write cycles) of flash memory cells is limited, it is
    important that writes are distributed over the entire array as far as
    possible. In SSDs this is done automatically by the controller, which
    dynamically alters the physical to logical address mapping. I imagine
    that SD and CF card controllers would do something similar, but I've not
    seen anything recently to confirm that.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Sep 16, 2012
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Fri, 14 Sep 2012 21:23:23 -0400, Mort <> wrote:
    : Alan Browne wrote:
    : > On 2012.09.14 16:33 , tony cooper wrote:
    : >> On Fri, 14 Sep 2012 16:02:41 -0400, Alan Browne
    : >> <> wrote:
    : >>
    : >>> On 2012.09.14 11:29 , Mark F wrote:
    : >>>> I recently started using a Canon PowerShot G12 camera.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> As per my usual practice, I periodically use a synchronization program
    : >>>> to make sure that I have a copy of the data on the card from the
    : >>>> camera on my computer. I set the program only check path, length,
    : >>>> and various time fields, rather than comparing the contents of all
    : >>>> of the files that are already present on both the disk copy and the
    : >>>> card from the camera.
    : >>>
    : >>> Maybe I misunderstand you, but common practice is to move all photos
    : >>> from the camera (or card) to the computer, verify that they are copied
    : >>> (random sample a few phots to be sure they're okay), then delete them to
    : >>> free up room to take more photos.
    : >>
    : >> That's my procedure. Upload, check to see if all were uploaded,
    : >> return the SD card to the camera, and then format the SD card.
    : >>
    : >> Bridge can be set to upload and then automatically clear the SD card,
    : >> but I don't check that box.
    : >
    : > I don't either. When I'm satisfied with the upload, and after GPS
    : > tagging has run (and the files are okay), then I manually delete them.
    : >
    : Hi,
    :
    : Inasmuch as a good brand name 4 GB SD card costs about $7.- and gives me
    : over 400 pictures at best JPEG setting, I use the SD cards to store my
    : images, in addition to hard drive. It is a cost-effective backup, and to
    : date my images from back to 2004 on SD cards are still pristine. The SD
    : card images might even "outlive" CD-R backups.
    :
    : Mort Linder
    :
    : USA

    SD cards are easily lost, misplaced, or broken. They are not a good choice for
    long-term storage. You are, of course, free to do it any way you like. But
    you've already heard from people whose combined experience with photography is
    over 200 years. So I suggest that you at least listen to their advice with an
    open mind.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Sep 17, 2012
    #7
  8. Mort <> wrote:

    > Inasmuch as a good brand name 4 GB SD card costs about $7.- and gives me
    > over 400 pictures at best JPEG setting,


    not everyone uses just JPEG.

    > I use the SD cards to store my
    > images, in addition to hard drive. It is a cost-effective backup, and to
    > date my images from back to 2004 on SD cards are still pristine. The SD
    > card images might even "outlive" CD-R backups.


    Which is no real feat, considering that I wouldn't thrust CD-R
    to work for a decade[1]. Even those "gold" ones need quite
    specialized storage conditions to get close to their "100 years".
    M-Disc is probably the only one which'll last a lifetime, even
    under ordinary conditions.

    -Wolfgang

    [1] Means each and every one. Some will work longer ... but
    some won't. And I'd be using dvdisaster to help with coping
    with degrading disks.
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Sep 18, 2012
    #8
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