Re: Camera JPEG engines

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Rob, Nov 19, 2012.

  1. Rob

    Rob Guest

    On 21/11/2012 10:18 AM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, Eric Stevens
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>>>>>> there is also no problem whatsoever with airport security with
    >>>>>>> laptops.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> It's an extra step each time, but no big deal.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> you mean taking it out of the bag? that's not always required, but when
    >>>>> it is, it's not a big deal.
    >>>>
    >>>> A laptop is a PITA.
    >>>>
    >>>> If I could I would leave it in my main bag where it would go straight
    >>>> through without any further involvement on my part. As it is, I have
    >>>> to carry it on for a security check and, at the best, it is a further
    >>>> complication to my hand baggage.
    >>>
    >>> some places let you leave a laptop in the bag, including the usa for
    >>> precheck. otherwise, it takes 10-15 seconds to remove it and put in a
    >>> bin.

    >>
    >> By that time I've checked in my main baggage. I only have carry-on
    >> luggage.

    >
    > are you saying you want to put a laptop in checked bags? that's *not*
    > wise. laptops go in carry-on, as does anything else of value.
    >
    > checked bags can get lost, or worse, stuff can be stolen from them.
    > they are also tossed around and a laptop really isn't suited to that
    > type of treatment. the airlines say not to put anything valuable in
    > there and don't cover much if you do.
    >



    Not sure to whom you refer but 'If I could I would leave it in ...'
    Rob, Nov 21, 2012
    #21
    1. Advertising

  2. nospam <> writes:

    > In article <>, David Dyer-Bennet
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> >> I'm going to sit down and have a good think about what direction to
    >> >> take. Have a portable HDD but 60GB HDD which I used about 10 years ago
    >> >> too slow to download stuff. Took a laptop once. bulky, battery went
    >> >> flat, bloody airport security problems, now down to an iPad for
    >> >> communications.
    >> >
    >> > you're just making excuses. your 60g hd is no slower now than it was
    >> > when it was new.

    >>
    >> But the quantity to be transferred today is larger, so the speed matters
    >> more.

    >
    > it's going to take longer to transfer a larger file than a smaller file
    > no matter how fast the medium is.


    A medium that was fast enough for the smaller files of the past will be
    too slow for the larger files of today.

    >> > many laptops are under 3 pounds and can slip into a
    >> > jacket pocket.

    >>
    >> Netbooks, maybe, but those aren't useful for photo work.

    >
    > ultrabooks, which are very useful for photo work.


    Isn't that a brand name? I don't know of it as a category.

    >> > battery life on laptops is anywhere from 5-10 hours,
    >> > depending on the laptop and there's always plugging it into the wall or
    >> > car.

    >>
    >> I've never achieved that level of battery life in any laptop I've bought
    >> or even looked at on paper. I think you're confusing "netbooks" with
    >> laptops, again.

    >
    > nope. the macbook air gets 5-7 hours, depending on if it's the 11" or
    > 13". macbook pros can do 7-10 hours, depending on which one, but the
    > 15" and certainly the 17" wont fit in a jacket quite as easily as an
    > air.
    >
    > <http://www.apple.com/macbookair/specs.html>
    > <http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2010/04/apple-macbook-pro.ht
    > ml>


    But the batteries aren't replaceable by the user yes.

    >> I do of course plug my laptop in a lot; I don't find using it on battery
    >> to be that important.

    >
    > same here.
    >
    >> > there is also no problem whatsoever with airport security with
    >> > laptops.

    >>
    >> It's an extra step each time, but no big deal.

    >
    > you mean taking it out of the bag? that's not always required, but when
    > it is, it's not a big deal.


    It's been required whenever I've travelled in the last few years,
    anyway.

    >> I can't imagine going on a photo trip without a laptop myself. I also
    >> carry an external drive to back up the photos two (leaving me just two
    >> copies, one on the laptop and one on the external; which always go in
    >> different bags).

    >
    > depends on the length of the trip. for a day or two, i don't bother
    > with a laptop.


    It's crucial to seeing how things are doing, and also to making backups
    of the images.
    --
    Googleproofaddress(account:dd-b provider:dd-b domain:net)
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, Nov 21, 2012
    #22
    1. Advertising

  3. nospam <> writes:

    > In article <>, Eric Stevens
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> >> >> > there is also no problem whatsoever with airport security with
    >> >> >> > laptops.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> It's an extra step each time, but no big deal.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >you mean taking it out of the bag? that's not always required, but when
    >> >> >it is, it's not a big deal.
    >> >>
    >> >> A laptop is a PITA.
    >> >>
    >> >> If I could I would leave it in my main bag where it would go straight
    >> >> through without any further involvement on my part. As it is, I have
    >> >> to carry it on for a security check and, at the best, it is a further
    >> >> complication to my hand baggage.
    >> >
    >> >some places let you leave a laptop in the bag, including the usa for
    >> >precheck. otherwise, it takes 10-15 seconds to remove it and put in a
    >> >bin.

    >>
    >> By that time I've checked in my main baggage. I only have carry-on
    >> luggage.

    >
    > are you saying you want to put a laptop in checked bags? that's *not*
    > wise. laptops go in carry-on, as does anything else of value.
    >
    > checked bags can get lost, or worse, stuff can be stolen from them.
    > they are also tossed around and a laptop really isn't suited to that
    > type of treatment. the airlines say not to put anything valuable in
    > there and don't cover much if you do.


    Yeah, and then make carry-on limits that sometimes make it impossible
    for me to follow both sets of rules (the camera gear and computer gear
    I'm taking with me exceeds carry-on limits).
    --
    Googleproofaddress(account:dd-b provider:dd-b domain:net)
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, Nov 21, 2012
    #23
  4. Rob

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, David Dyer-Bennet
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> I'm going to sit down and have a good think about what direction to
    > >> >> take. Have a portable HDD but 60GB HDD which I used about 10 years ago
    > >> >> too slow to download stuff. Took a laptop once. bulky, battery went
    > >> >> flat, bloody airport security problems, now down to an iPad for
    > >> >> communications.
    > >> >
    > >> > you're just making excuses. your 60g hd is no slower now than it was
    > >> > when it was new.
    > >>
    > >> But the quantity to be transferred today is larger, so the speed matters
    > >> more.

    > >
    > > it's going to take longer to transfer a larger file than a smaller file
    > > no matter how fast the medium is.

    >
    > A medium that was fast enough for the smaller files of the past will be
    > too slow for the larger files of today.


    it's the same speed it's always been. it doesn't get any slower over
    time.

    the real limit is its capacity, not its speed. some cameras now have 50
    meg raws, compared to 5 meg raws when 60 gig was considered 'a big hard
    drive'. 60 gig fills up faster than it used to.

    > >> > many laptops are under 3 pounds and can slip into a
    > >> > jacket pocket.
    > >>
    > >> Netbooks, maybe, but those aren't useful for photo work.

    > >
    > > ultrabooks, which are very useful for photo work.

    >
    > Isn't that a brand name? I don't know of it as a category.


    it's both, but i was referring to the category.

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultrabook>
    Ultrabooks are designed to feature reduced bulk without compromising
    performance and battery life. They use low-power Intel Core
    processors, solid-state drives, and unibody chassis to help meet
    these criteria.

    <http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/sponsors-of-tomorrow/ultrabook.h
    tml>

    > >> > battery life on laptops is anywhere from 5-10 hours,
    > >> > depending on the laptop and there's always plugging it into the wall or
    > >> > car.
    > >>
    > >> I've never achieved that level of battery life in any laptop I've bought
    > >> or even looked at on paper. I think you're confusing "netbooks" with
    > >> laptops, again.

    > >
    > > nope. the macbook air gets 5-7 hours, depending on if it's the 11" or
    > > 13". macbook pros can do 7-10 hours, depending on which one, but the
    > > 15" and certainly the 17" wont fit in a jacket quite as easily as an
    > > air.
    > >
    > > <http://www.apple.com/macbookair/specs.html>
    > > <http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2010/04/apple-macbook-pro.html>

    >
    > But the batteries aren't replaceable by the user yes.


    so what? it's not just apple. most ultrabooks are like that.

    the result is longer battery run time and a thinner, lighter and more
    reliable laptop. that is something that benefits users every day.

    it's almost guaranteed that the user will never replace the battery in
    the product's lifetime. the battery is rated for 5 years and by then,
    the user will probably want a new laptop (not just a new battery), if
    they haven't already upgraded it to something better before then
    (typical ownership is around 3 years). in other words, the battery will
    outlast the computer.

    worst case, the battery is replaced once, which is generally a
    while-you-wait at an apple store, and for those handy with a
    screwdriver, it's not all that hard to do it on their own.

    > >> > there is also no problem whatsoever with airport security with
    > >> > laptops.
    > >>
    > >> It's an extra step each time, but no big deal.

    > >
    > > you mean taking it out of the bag? that's not always required, but when
    > > it is, it's not a big deal.

    >
    > It's been required whenever I've travelled in the last few years,
    > anyway.


    it depends where. some countries don't have the silly charades
    regarding laptops, and as i said in another post, putting a laptop in a
    bin is not required with precheck (nor are shoes or liquids).

    also, ultrabooks are small enough that they aren't considered dangerous
    by some abstract and secret metric, so they can be left in the bag, as
    can ipads and other tablets.

    for larger laptops, it takes 10 seconds, maybe 15 on a slow day, to
    take it out of a bag and put it in a bin, so even when it's required,
    it's still not a big deal.

    > >> I can't imagine going on a photo trip without a laptop myself. I also
    > >> carry an external drive to back up the photos two (leaving me just two
    > >> copies, one on the laptop and one on the external; which always go in
    > >> different bags).

    > >
    > > depends on the length of the trip. for a day or two, i don't bother
    > > with a laptop.

    >
    > It's crucial to seeing how things are doing, and also to making backups
    > of the images.


    for a 1-2 day trip, i bring an ipad, which works fine for copying
    images. a laptop for that short of a trip is overkill. a portable
    storage device (hd enclosure & cardslot) works well in place of a
    laptop too.

    plus, flash cards are very reliable and i'm not particularly worried
    about data loss if i didn't have anywhere to copy it. sometimes i take
    just the camera and a bunch of cards and copy them when i get home.
    nospam, Nov 21, 2012
    #24
  5. Rob

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, David Dyer-Bennet
    <> wrote:

    > >> >some places let you leave a laptop in the bag, including the usa for
    > >> >precheck. otherwise, it takes 10-15 seconds to remove it and put in a
    > >> >bin.
    > >>
    > >> By that time I've checked in my main baggage. I only have carry-on
    > >> luggage.

    > >
    > > are you saying you want to put a laptop in checked bags? that's *not*
    > > wise. laptops go in carry-on, as does anything else of value.
    > >
    > > checked bags can get lost, or worse, stuff can be stolen from them.
    > > they are also tossed around and a laptop really isn't suited to that
    > > type of treatment. the airlines say not to put anything valuable in
    > > there and don't cover much if you do.

    >
    > Yeah, and then make carry-on limits that sometimes make it impossible
    > for me to follow both sets of rules (the camera gear and computer gear
    > I'm taking with me exceeds carry-on limits).


    camera gear is exempt from the 2 bag rule, however, camera gear tends
    to run up against weight limits, which fortunately, are not imposed on
    domestic flights.

    that's why clothing with large pockets is fantastic. load it up with
    the heavy and often bulky stuff like lenses, tablets, etc, and leave
    the lightweight stuff in the bag. the weight limit applies to the bag,
    not jackets or pants.

    plus, taking a laptop onboard means you can use it on the plane during
    the flight, which is very likely to have wifi.
    nospam, Nov 21, 2012
    #25
  6. Rob

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/20/2012 9:51 AM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <k8fmbk$q4k$>, Rob
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> I'm going to sit down and have a good think about what direction to
    >> take. Have a portable HDD but 60GB HDD which I used about 10 years ago
    >> too slow to download stuff. Took a laptop once. bulky, battery went
    >> flat, bloody airport security problems, now down to an iPad for
    >> communications.

    >
    > you're just making excuses. your 60g hd is no slower now than it was
    > when it was new. many laptops are under 3 pounds and can slip into a
    > jacket pocket. battery life on laptops is anywhere from 5-10 hours,
    > depending on the laptop and there's always plugging it into the wall or
    > car. there is also no problem whatsoever with airport security with
    > laptops.
    >


    Another survey?
    Airport security has a time consuming protocol if your laptop doesn't
    turn on.

    BTW I didn't realize that the old serial ports were just as fast as
    firewire, USB2 and USB3. Thanks for clearing that up.

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 21, 2012
    #26
  7. Rob

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/20/2012 9:31 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > nospam <> writes:
    >
    >> In article <>, Eric Stevens
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>>>>>> there is also no problem whatsoever with airport security with
    >>>>>>>> laptops.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> It's an extra step each time, but no big deal.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> you mean taking it out of the bag? that's not always required, but when
    >>>>>> it is, it's not a big deal.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> A laptop is a PITA.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If I could I would leave it in my main bag where it would go straight
    >>>>> through without any further involvement on my part. As it is, I have
    >>>>> to carry it on for a security check and, at the best, it is a further
    >>>>> complication to my hand baggage.
    >>>>
    >>>> some places let you leave a laptop in the bag, including the usa for
    >>>> precheck. otherwise, it takes 10-15 seconds to remove it and put in a
    >>>> bin.
    >>>
    >>> By that time I've checked in my main baggage. I only have carry-on
    >>> luggage.

    >>
    >> are you saying you want to put a laptop in checked bags? that's *not*
    >> wise. laptops go in carry-on, as does anything else of value.
    >>
    >> checked bags can get lost, or worse, stuff can be stolen from them.
    >> they are also tossed around and a laptop really isn't suited to that
    >> type of treatment. the airlines say not to put anything valuable in
    >> there and don't cover much if you do.

    >
    > Yeah, and then make carry-on limits that sometimes make it impossible
    > for me to follow both sets of rules (the camera gear and computer gear
    > I'm taking with me exceeds carry-on limits).
    >


    Some members of my CC wear a photo vest and stuff a lot of gear into its
    pockets. A vest is considered clothing, not luggage. One of my friends
    convinced an airline that if his wife's pocket book didn't count as a
    carry on bag, one of his bags was also a pocket book, which didn't count
    as luggage. His argument was not so successful on the return trip.

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 21, 2012
    #27
  8. Rob

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/20/2012 6:05 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2012-11-20 14:32:10 -0800, Rob <> said:
    >
    >> On 21/11/2012 8:17 AM, Frank S wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "Rob" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:k8fs8h$qmm$...
    >>>> On 20/11/2012 7:15 PM, David Taylor wrote:
    >>>>> On 20/11/2012 07:02, Alfred Molon wrote:
    >>>>>> In article <k8f3p2$3ml$>, Rob says...
    >>>>>>> No but I don't get to go places all the time so I take quite a
    >>>>>>> few
    >>>>>>> images when I travel - 7000 images last time
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> It must take forever to process all these images.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So you try and get them right in the camera, rather than relying on
    >>>>> having to post-process!
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes - getting them right in the first place to eliminates post
    >>>> processing. Taking heaps of happy snaps and scabbing a shot is far
    >>>> from ideal.
    >>>>
    >>>> Having an understanding of what you are doing. Evaluating the scene
    >>>> and thinking what will happen. Difficult situations like wind, extreme
    >>>> contrast, sports etc - you should know how to maximise to get the shot.
    >>>>
    >>>> Understand your camera.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Yes - I would like to understand "scabbing" in this context.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Take lots of shots and fluke a keeper.

    >
    > Aah! The search for the magnificent miracle.
    >
    > No wonder you fill up those cards with JPEGs.
    >

    Mumbling something about infinite monkeys and Shakespeare.


    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 21, 2012
    #28
  9. Rob

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/20/2012 6:04 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2012-11-20 13:17:39 -0800, "Frank S" <> said:
    >
    >>
    >> "Rob" <> wrote in message
    >> news:k8fs8h$qmm$...
    >>> On 20/11/2012 7:15 PM, David Taylor wrote:
    >>>> On 20/11/2012 07:02, Alfred Molon wrote:
    >>>>> In article <k8f3p2$3ml$>, Rob says...
    >>>>>> No but I don't get to go places all the time so I take quite a few
    >>>>>> images when I travel - 7000 images last time
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It must take forever to process all these images.
    >>>>
    >>>> So you try and get them right in the camera, rather than relying on
    >>>> having to post-process!
    >>>
    >>> Yes - getting them right in the first place to eliminates post
    >>> processing. Taking heaps of happy snaps and scabbing a shot is far
    >>> from ideal.
    >>>
    >>> Having an understanding of what you are doing. Evaluating the scene
    >>> and thinking what will happen. Difficult situations like wind,
    >>> extreme contrast, sports etc - you should know how to maximise to get
    >>> the shot.
    >>>
    >>> Understand your camera.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yes - I would like to understand "scabbing" in this context.

    >
    > The term only applies to non-union, picket line crossing photographers.
    >


    And certain STDs

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 21, 2012
    #29
  10. Rob

    nospam Guest

    In article <50ac4dd7$0$10753$-secrets.com>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > Airport security has a time consuming protocol if your laptop doesn't
    > turn on.


    it's been a *long* time since they did that. you don't fly much, do you?

    last time i saw them checking if a laptop turns on was over a decade
    ago, and even if they decided to start doing that again (which they
    aren't about to), why wouldn't your laptop turn on? do you travel with
    a laptop that has a dead battery???

    laptops go into a bin and then through the x-ray and that's all the
    attention it gets unless there's something unusual, in which case it
    probably will just get an etd swab which takes maybe a minute extra.

    > BTW I didn't realize that the old serial ports were just as fast as
    > firewire, USB2 and USB3. Thanks for clearing that up.


    what in the world does that have to do with anything? and what hard
    drives have serial ports? do you just make this shit up?

    any other stupid comments?
    nospam, Nov 21, 2012
    #30
  11. Rob

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 20 Nov 2012 22:56:46 -0500, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 11/20/2012 9:31 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >> nospam <> writes:
    >>
    >>> In article <>, Eric Stevens
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>> there is also no problem whatsoever with airport security with
    >>>>>>>>> laptops.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> It's an extra step each time, but no big deal.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> you mean taking it out of the bag? that's not always required, but when
    >>>>>>> it is, it's not a big deal.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> A laptop is a PITA.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> If I could I would leave it in my main bag where it would go straight
    >>>>>> through without any further involvement on my part. As it is, I have
    >>>>>> to carry it on for a security check and, at the best, it is a further
    >>>>>> complication to my hand baggage.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> some places let you leave a laptop in the bag, including the usa for
    >>>>> precheck. otherwise, it takes 10-15 seconds to remove it and put in a
    >>>>> bin.
    >>>>
    >>>> By that time I've checked in my main baggage. I only have carry-on
    >>>> luggage.
    >>>
    >>> are you saying you want to put a laptop in checked bags? that's *not*
    >>> wise. laptops go in carry-on, as does anything else of value.
    >>>
    >>> checked bags can get lost, or worse, stuff can be stolen from them.
    >>> they are also tossed around and a laptop really isn't suited to that
    >>> type of treatment. the airlines say not to put anything valuable in
    >>> there and don't cover much if you do.

    >>
    >> Yeah, and then make carry-on limits that sometimes make it impossible
    >> for me to follow both sets of rules (the camera gear and computer gear
    >> I'm taking with me exceeds carry-on limits).
    >>

    >
    >Some members of my CC wear a photo vest and stuff a lot of gear into its
    >pockets. A vest is considered clothing, not luggage. One of my friends
    >convinced an airline that if his wife's pocket book didn't count as a
    >carry on bag, one of his bags was also a pocket book, which didn't count
    >as luggage. His argument was not so successful on the return trip.


    Allegiant Airlines restricts free carry-on to one personal item, but
    exempts certain items like medical equipment, mobility aids, and a few
    other things including a diaper bag. There is nothing in Allegiant's
    rules that says a baby must accompany the diaper bag. I wonder if you
    could have two free personal items, including a diaper bag, if you
    travel without a baby.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 21, 2012
    #31
  12. Rob

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > Allegiant Airlines restricts free carry-on to one personal item, but
    > exempts certain items like medical equipment, mobility aids, and a few
    > other things including a diaper bag. There is nothing in Allegiant's
    > rules that says a baby must accompany the diaper bag. I wonder if you
    > could have two free personal items, including a diaper bag, if you
    > travel without a baby.


    too bad you can't afford the good airlines.

    allegiant is a customer-hostile airline that charges extra for pretty
    much everything, including choosing your seats and ordinary beverages,
    such as juice or soda (not booze), and i think even water.

    <http://www.vegasinc.com/news/2012/apr/02/allegiant-adding-carry--fee-35-
    flight-segment/>
    Las Vegas-based Allegiant Air will impose a $35 fee per flight
    segment on passengers taking carry-on luggage stowed in overhead bins
    beginning with Wednesday bookings, the airline confirmed Monday.

    <http://www.gadling.com/2008/01/07/why-does-allegiant-air-need-two-hours-
    of-my-life/>
    Allegiant, like most other budget airlines, charges extra for
    virtually everything beyond the ticket price, including (for two
    passengers) a $44 "seat selection fee," and a $17 "convenience fee"
    for booking online.
    nospam, Nov 21, 2012
    #32
  13. Rob

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/20/2012 11:05 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <50ac4dd7$0$10753$-secrets.com>, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Airport security has a time consuming protocol if your laptop doesn't
    >> turn on.

    >
    > it's been a *long* time since they did that. you don't fly much, do you?
    >
    > last time i saw them checking if a laptop turns on was over a decade
    > ago, and even if they decided to start doing that again (which they
    > aren't about to), why wouldn't your laptop turn on? do you travel with
    > a laptop that has a dead battery???
    >
    > laptops go into a bin and then through the x-ray and that's all the
    > attention it gets unless there's something unusual, in which case it
    > probably will just get an etd swab which takes maybe a minute extra.


    I bow to the statements of an expert in aviation security.

    >
    >> BTW I didn't realize that the old serial ports were just as fast as
    >> firewire, USB2 and USB3. Thanks for clearing that up.

    >
    > what in the world does that have to do with anything? and what hard
    > drives have serial ports? do you just make this shit up?
    >
    > any other stupid comments?
    >

    I was simply responding to your asinine statement, that old hard drives
    are as fast as the newer ones. You are free to go back and read it.

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 21, 2012
    #33
  14. Rob

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/20/2012 11:09 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Nov 2012 22:56:46 -0500, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 11/20/2012 9:31 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >>> nospam <> writes:
    >>>
    >>>> In article <>, Eric Stevens
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> there is also no problem whatsoever with airport security with
    >>>>>>>>>> laptops.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> It's an extra step each time, but no big deal.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> you mean taking it out of the bag? that's not always required, but when
    >>>>>>>> it is, it's not a big deal.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> A laptop is a PITA.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> If I could I would leave it in my main bag where it would go straight
    >>>>>>> through without any further involvement on my part. As it is, I have
    >>>>>>> to carry it on for a security check and, at the best, it is a further
    >>>>>>> complication to my hand baggage.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> some places let you leave a laptop in the bag, including the usa for
    >>>>>> precheck. otherwise, it takes 10-15 seconds to remove it and put in a
    >>>>>> bin.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> By that time I've checked in my main baggage. I only have carry-on
    >>>>> luggage.
    >>>>
    >>>> are you saying you want to put a laptop in checked bags? that's *not*
    >>>> wise. laptops go in carry-on, as does anything else of value.
    >>>>
    >>>> checked bags can get lost, or worse, stuff can be stolen from them.
    >>>> they are also tossed around and a laptop really isn't suited to that
    >>>> type of treatment. the airlines say not to put anything valuable in
    >>>> there and don't cover much if you do.
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, and then make carry-on limits that sometimes make it impossible
    >>> for me to follow both sets of rules (the camera gear and computer gear
    >>> I'm taking with me exceeds carry-on limits).
    >>>

    >>
    >> Some members of my CC wear a photo vest and stuff a lot of gear into its
    >> pockets. A vest is considered clothing, not luggage. One of my friends
    >> convinced an airline that if his wife's pocket book didn't count as a
    >> carry on bag, one of his bags was also a pocket book, which didn't count
    >> as luggage. His argument was not so successful on the return trip.

    >
    > Allegiant Airlines restricts free carry-on to one personal item, but
    > exempts certain items like medical equipment, mobility aids, and a few
    > other things including a diaper bag. There is nothing in Allegiant's
    > rules that says a baby must accompany the diaper bag. I wonder if you
    > could have two free personal items, including a diaper bag, if you
    > travel without a baby.
    >
    >
    >

    It Depends.

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 21, 2012
    #34
  15. Rob

    nospam Guest

    In article <50ac5cff$0$10761$-secrets.com>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > >> BTW I didn't realize that the old serial ports were just as fast as
    > >> firewire, USB2 and USB3. Thanks for clearing that up.

    > >
    > > what in the world does that have to do with anything? and what hard
    > > drives have serial ports? do you just make this shit up?
    > >
    > > any other stupid comments?

    >
    > I was simply responding to your asinine statement, that old hard drives
    > are as fast as the newer ones.


    i never said any such thing. are you trying to outdo tony in twisting
    and fabricating things, or is it that you can't read very well?

    > You are free to go back and read it.


    why don't you do that before you say more stupid things.
    nospam, Nov 21, 2012
    #35
  16. Rob

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 20 Nov 2012 20:26:22 -0800, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> Allegiant Airlines restricts free carry-on to one personal item, but
    >> exempts certain items like medical equipment, mobility aids, and a few
    >> other things including a diaper bag. There is nothing in Allegiant's
    >> rules that says a baby must accompany the diaper bag. I wonder if you
    >> could have two free personal items, including a diaper bag, if you
    >> travel without a baby.

    >
    >too bad you can't afford the good airlines.



    Allegiant flies direct from Sanford FL to Rockford IL. My wife was
    flying back to her home town - Rockford - for a sister's funeral.
    There are no direct flights to Rockford out of Orlando.

    The Sanford airport is a short and convenient drive from our house.
    The Orlando airport is almost an hour's longer drive from my house due
    to distance and traffic. It takes almost as long to get from the
    parking garage at ORL to the check-in counter at ORL as it does for me
    to drive from home to SFB. Check-in and bag retrieval is faster at
    Sanford than at Orlando.

    >allegiant is a customer-hostile airline that charges extra for pretty
    >much everything, including choosing your seats and ordinary beverages,
    >such as juice or soda (not booze), and i think even water.
    >
    ><http://www.vegasinc.com/news/2012/apr/02/allegiant-adding-carry--fee-35-
    >flight-segment/>
    > Las Vegas-based Allegiant Air will impose a $35 fee per flight
    > segment on passengers taking carry-on luggage stowed in overhead bins
    > beginning with Wednesday bookings, the airline confirmed Monday.
    >
    ><http://www.gadling.com/2008/01/07/why-does-allegiant-air-need-two-hours-
    >of-my-life/>
    > Allegiant, like most other budget airlines, charges extra for
    > virtually everything beyond the ticket price, including (for two
    > passengers) a $44 "seat selection fee," and a $17 "convenience fee"
    > for booking online.


    I may have paid extra, but it was more convenient for us for my wife
    to fly Allegiant. I booked at the airport a few days earlier as it
    wasn't out of my way to do so, and didn't reserve a seat. Seating was
    no problem. She carried on a cloth shopping bag containing her purse,
    some (real) books, and whatever else it is that women feel necessary
    to have with them. No charge for that. She checked one bag.

    She was quite satisfied with Allegiant, and would fly them again.
    There were no alleged market survey people aboard to bother her with
    questions about laptop brand preference.

    You do bring up some idiotic points.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 21, 2012
    #36
  17. Rob

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 20 Nov 2012 23:47:22 -0500, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 11/20/2012 11:05 PM, nospam wrote:
    >> In article <50ac4dd7$0$10753$-secrets.com>, PeterN
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Airport security has a time consuming protocol if your laptop doesn't
    >>> turn on.

    >>
    >> it's been a *long* time since they did that. you don't fly much, do you?
    >>
    >> last time i saw them checking if a laptop turns on was over a decade
    >> ago, and even if they decided to start doing that again (which they
    >> aren't about to), why wouldn't your laptop turn on? do you travel with
    >> a laptop that has a dead battery???
    >>
    >> laptops go into a bin and then through the x-ray and that's all the
    >> attention it gets unless there's something unusual, in which case it
    >> probably will just get an etd swab which takes maybe a minute extra.

    >
    >I bow to the statements of an expert in aviation security.


    As well as an expert in department store security and how not to come
    to their attention when wearing his booster pocket jacket.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 21, 2012
    #37
  18. Rob

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > As well as an expert in department store security and how not to come
    > to their attention when wearing his booster pocket jacket.


    further displaying your extreme ignorance.
    nospam, Nov 21, 2012
    #38
  19. Rob

    David Taylor Guest

    On 20/11/2012 20:43, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > nospam <> writes:

    []
    >> many laptops are under 3 pounds and can slip into a
    >> jacket pocket.

    >
    > Netbooks, maybe, but those aren't useful for photo work.

    []
    > I can't imagine going on a photo trip without a laptop myself. I also
    > carry an external drive to back up the photos two (leaving me just two
    > copies, one on the laptop and one on the external; which always go in
    > different bags).


    Netbooks are fine both for a quick review and for storage, but I agree
    that they are less suited to CPU-intensive processes.

    I would normally take my netbook on an extended trip (as the laptop is
    now a little big for the limited cabin baggage allowance we sometimes
    have), but on the last 5-day trip I took only the iPad. That still left
    me with two copies of the images - one on the camera SD cards (I never
    re-use cards whilst away) and one on the iPad. Actually, with its 2048
    x 1536 3 Mpix display, the iPad makes a rather good review device as
    well as providing storage.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Nov 21, 2012
    #39
  20. Rob

    David Taylor Guest

    On 21/11/2012 03:30, nospam wrote:
    []
    > plus, taking a laptop onboard means you can use it on the plane during
    > the flight, which is very likely to have wifi.


    Not the case on all the flights I have taken recently! No Wi-Fi here,
    (yet)!
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Nov 21, 2012
    #40
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