Re: Businesses adopt Windows 7 at record speed

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by AD., Nov 8, 2010.

  1. AD.

    AD. Guest

    On Nov 9, 2:02 am, "impossible" <> wrote:
    > "IT managers worldwide are preparing for a significant desktop
    > transformation over the next three years. Why? As firms naturally refresh
    > their PCs, IT managers are already deploying Windows 7 on 31% of new PCs
    > today, and within a year the number will increase to 83%."
    >
    > The numbers are based on a survey of 774 PC decision-makers at both large
    > and small businesses.
    >
    > "On NetMarketShare's numbers, Windows 7 has 18.33% of the market, ahead of
    > Vista (12.93%) but a long way behind Windows XP (58.92%). However, companies
    > should find it relatively easy to flip Vista PCs to Windows 7, which would
    > bump it up to 31%. If companies switch 1% of their PCs from XP to Windows 7
    > each month, Windows 7 could be the market leader by the end of next year.


    Wow - at these record breaking rates of adoption and if all goes well
    by the end of next year, the by then 2 and bit year old version of
    Windows might even be more popular than the version that will (by
    then) be over a decade old.

    In other record breaking news the 100m sprint world record for three
    toed sloths has been shattered and now stands at an incredible 24 min
    32 sec!

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Nov 8, 2010
    #1
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  2. AD.

    AD. Guest

    On Nov 9, 1:38 pm, "impossible" <> wrote:
    > "AD."  wrote in message
    > > Wow - at these record breaking rates of adoption and if all goes well
    > > by the end of next year, the by then 2 and bit year old version of
    > > Windows might even be more popular than the version that will (by
    > > then) be over a decade old.

    >
    > Just as XP finally surpassed Win9x, yes -- only Windows 7 is replacing XP at
    > a much faster clip.


    Yep, just like three toed sloths are now exploding out of the starting
    blocks at a much faster clip. Next you'll be telling us about
    discovering that some tectonic plate somewhere has suddenly increased
    speed by 25%.

    Just because something has got faster doesn't make it fast.

    > And then there's this decidedly more relevant comparison:
    >
    > After 19 years, all versions of linux combined have managed to capture about
    > 1 percent of desktop usage. At these record breaking rates of adoption, and
    > if all goes well, by the end of next year the by then 20-year old linux will
    > still have about a 1 percent share.


    You must have a different definition of 'relevant'. Wasn't your topic
    about Windows 7 and how it takes 2 and a half years to overtake a 10yr
    old version that is still 2 major releases behind anyway?

    But as you seem to want to compare other stuff to that blistering
    adoption rate - XP is roughly the same age as Mac OS X 10.1 and Redhat
    7.2 which are ancient history. Hell even BeOS and Amiga Inc still
    existed back then. A better comparison would be glacial stuff like
    Solaris, AIX and Oracle - and even those guys might not have 60% of
    their installed base on a decade old version.

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Nov 9, 2010
    #2
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  3. AD.

    victor Guest

    On 9/11/2010 9:43 a.m., AD. wrote:
    > On Nov 9, 2:02 am, "impossible"<> wrote:
    >> "IT managers worldwide are preparing for a significant desktop
    >> transformation over the next three years. Why? As firms naturally refresh
    >> their PCs, IT managers are already deploying Windows 7 on 31% of new PCs
    >> today, and within a year the number will increase to 83%."
    >>
    >> The numbers are based on a survey of 774 PC decision-makers at both large
    >> and small businesses.
    >>
    >> "On NetMarketShare's numbers, Windows 7 has 18.33% of the market, ahead of
    >> Vista (12.93%) but a long way behind Windows XP (58.92%). However, companies
    >> should find it relatively easy to flip Vista PCs to Windows 7, which would
    >> bump it up to 31%. If companies switch 1% of their PCs from XP to Windows 7
    >> each month, Windows 7 could be the market leader by the end of next year.

    >
    > Wow - at these record breaking rates of adoption and if all goes well
    > by the end of next year, the by then 2 and bit year old version of
    > Windows might even be more popular than the version that will (by
    > then) be over a decade old.
    >
    > In other record breaking news the 100m sprint world record for three
    > toed sloths has been shattered and now stands at an incredible 24 min
    > 32 sec!
    >
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Anton


    31% of NEW PCs !!
    That is shocking, you would expect all of the new PCs to be Windows 7
    Are they actually downgrading to XP remain compatible with their
    existing installations ?
     
    victor, Nov 9, 2010
    #3
  4. AD.

    AD. Guest

    On Nov 9, 2:42 pm, "impossible" <> wrote:
    > Windows 7 is the fastest growing operating system in history. Businesses are
    > adopting it at record speed. Deal with it!


    Personally it can't happen fast enough. The quicker IE 6 is replaced
    by IE 8 or later the better. The Windows corporate desktop really
    needs to shake free from its current legacy status that is holding
    back any kind of progress.

    > No, my topic was the record-breaking pace of Windows adoption by corporate
    > users. This fact is backed by one of the most reputable research firms in
    > the world.


    No it wasn't. The original topic and report summary was about Windows
    7 replacing XP and Vista - ie the rate of Windows upgrades. Nothing
    about anything else was mentioned.

    >
    > "More than one year after its general availability (GA) launch, Windows 7
    > powers one out of every 10 PCs within North American and European companies.
    > While far from overwhelming — especially considering that Windows XP still
    > powers 75% — IT managers worldwide are preparing for a significant desktop
    > transformation over the next three years. Why? As firms naturally refresh
    > their PCs, IT managers are already deploying Windows 7 on 31% of new PCs
    > today, and within a year the number will increase to 83%. But this desktop
    > transformation involves more than just a simple hardware refresh and
    > operating system upgrade. It also entails empowering their workforce with
    > more modern browsers, office suite and productivity applications,
    > connectivity options, and security controls"


    Wow, Vista is 3+ years old, 7 is 1+ years old and XP is 9+ years old.
    And despite all that XP is still on 75% of corporate desktops.

    I can't think of any other period where the dominant corporate desktop
    OS was 9 years old. Did Win3.1 have 75% in 2001? Did Win95 have 75% in
    2004? Did NT4 have 75% in 2005? Did Win98 have 75% in 2007? Did Win2k
    have 75% in 2009?

    Corporate desktop upgrades just stopped happening and that situation
    became the norm rather than the exception. As XP comes closer to
    becoming unsupported legacy software, then of course the upgrade work
    to clear that huge backlog will have to increase.

    I'd hope Windows 7 would have an even faster adoption rate - there's
    many years of pent up demand for replacing XP. And Vista failed
    miserably in that regard. The so called 'high' Windows 7 adoption rate
    is basically a market correction caused by Vistas late delivery and
    unpopularity. All Windows 7 has to be is "not Vista".

    >
    > http://www.forrester.com/rb/Research/updated_2010_windows_7_commercia...
    >
    > All you've got to show for your pathetic attempt to cover up this
    > information is a loot of dribble forming at the corners of your mouth.


    Haha - The only thing being covered up is that this just a reflection
    of the glacial rates of Windows desktop upgrades over the last 5 years
    or so. Your attempts to change the topic are just trying to deflect
    attention away from that.

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Nov 9, 2010
    #4
  5. AD.

    David Empson Guest

    impossible <> wrote:

    > "victor" wrote in message news:ibabe1$ng7$...
    >
    > > On 9/11/2010 9:43 a.m., AD. wrote:
    > > > On Nov 9, 2:02 am, "impossible"<> wrote:
    > > >> "IT managers worldwide are preparing for a significant desktop
    > > >> transformation over the next three years. Why? As firms naturally
    > > >> refresh their PCs, IT managers are already deploying Windows 7 on 31%
    > > >> of new PCs today, and within a year the number will increase to 83%."
    > > >>
    > > >> The numbers are based on a survey of 774 PC decision-makers at both
    > > >> large and small businesses.
    > > >>
    > > >> "On NetMarketShare's numbers, Windows 7 has 18.33% of the market,
    > > >> ahead of Vista (12.93%) but a long way behind Windows XP (58.92%).
    > > >> However, companies should find it relatively easy to flip Vista PCs
    > > >> to Windows 7, which would bump it up to 31%. If companies switch 1%
    > > >> of their PCs from XP to Windows 7 each month, Windows 7 could be the
    > > >> market leader by the end of next year.
    > > >
    > > > Wow - at these record breaking rates of adoption and if all goes well
    > > > by the end of next year, the by then 2 and bit year old version of
    > > > Windows might even be more popular than the version that will (by
    > > > then) be over a decade old.
    > > >
    > > > In other record breaking news the 100m sprint world record for three
    > > > toed sloths has been shattered and now stands at an incredible 24 min
    > > > 32 sec!
    > > >

    > >
    > > 31% of NEW PCs !!

    >
    > <shakes head> Freetards seem terribly desperate. Is it the death of desktop
    > linux that has them upset?
    >
    > > That is shocking, you would expect all of the new PCs to be Windows 7

    >
    > Virtually all new PCs are Windows 7 PCs.


    That isn't what the article says. "IT managers are already deploying
    Windows 7 on 31% of new PCs today."

    If 31% of new business PCs are running Windows 7, what is running on the
    other 69% of new business PCs? I expect a small percentage of them will
    be running Linux, another small percentage running Mac OS X, and another
    small percentage running Vista. That leaves the bulk of new business PCs
    being purchased right now still running Windows XP.

    Aren't we already past the point where Microsoft has stopped issuing new
    licences for Windows XP? If so, this implies IT managers are wiping the
    OS that was supplied with the computer (if any) and replacing it with
    Windows XP from their existing licence pool, probably in many cases
    replacing an old PC with a new one, and using the same licence.

    > And in a year, Windows 7 is expected to gain over 80% of the desktop market.


    83% of new business PCs. The article says nothing about education or
    home computers.

    This means that in a year's time, about 17% of new business PCs (less
    some small percentage for other OSes) will STILL be having an old XP
    licence installed.

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Nov 9, 2010
    #5
  6. AD.

    David Empson Guest

    impossible <> wrote:

    > "David Empson" wrote in message
    > news:1jrpdbv.95kkkxq9btr6N%...
    >
    > "David Empson" wrote in message
    > news:1jrpdbv.95kkkxq9btr6N%...
    > >
    > > impossible <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > "victor" wrote in message news:ibabe1$ng7$...
    > > >
    > > > > On 9/11/2010 9:43 a.m., AD. wrote:
    > > > > > On Nov 9, 2:02 am, "impossible"<> wrote:
    > > > > >> "IT managers worldwide are preparing for a significant desktop
    > > > > >> transformation over the next three years. Why? As firms naturally
    > > > > >> refresh their PCs, IT managers are already deploying Windows 7 on
    > > > > >> 31%
    > > > > >> of new PCs today, and within a year the number will increase to
    > > > > >> 83%."
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> The numbers are based on a survey of 774 PC decision-makers at both
    > > > > >> large and small businesses.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> "On NetMarketShare's numbers, Windows 7 has 18.33% of the market,
    > > > > >> ahead of Vista (12.93%) but a long way behind Windows XP (58.92%).
    > > > > >> However, companies should find it relatively easy to flip Vista PCs
    > > > > >> to Windows 7, which would bump it up to 31%. If companies switch 1%
    > > > > >> of their PCs from XP to Windows 7 each month, Windows 7 could be
    > > > > >> the
    > > > > >> market leader by the end of next year.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Wow - at these record breaking rates of adoption and if all goes
    > > > > > well
    > > > > > by the end of next year, the by then 2 and bit year old version of
    > > > > > Windows might even be more popular than the version that will (by
    > > > > > then) be over a decade old.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > In other record breaking news the 100m sprint world record for three
    > > > > > toed sloths has been shattered and now stands at an incredible 24
    > > > > > min
    > > > > > 32 sec!
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > 31% of NEW PCs !!
    > > >
    > > > <shakes head> Freetards seem terribly desperate. Is it the death of
    > > > desktop
    > > > linux that has them upset?
    > > >
    > > > > That is shocking, you would expect all of the new PCs to be Windows 7
    > > >
    > > > Virtually all new PCs are Windows 7 PCs.

    > >
    > > That isn't what the article says. "IT managers are already deploying
    > > Windows 7 on 31% of new PCs today."

    >
    > Yes, "already deploying". And with each new pc deployed, the Windows 7
    > share goes up and up, because....careful now, this part is going to be
    > tricky for you....virtually all new PCs are Windows 7 PCs.


    Maybe they are sold with Windows 7, but based on that quoted paragraph,
    they aren't actually running Windows 7. 69% of them are running
    something else.

    > > If 31% of new business PCs are running Windows 7, what is running on the
    > > other 69% of new business PCs? I expect a small percentage of them will
    > > be running Linux, another small percentage running Mac OS X, and another
    > > small percentage running Vista. That leaves the bulk of new business PCs
    > > being purchased right now still running Windows XP.

    >
    > Can't you read?


    Yes. Apparently you can't.

    > The article reports that Windows 7 currently has 18%, Vista
    > 13%, XP 59%. A year from now, Windows 7 is expected to have 83%, Vista will
    > essentially disappear, and XP will remain on 17%.


    Rubbish. The part of the article referring to 18% for Win7, 13% for
    Vista, etc. is quoting NetMarketShare figures. These figures refer to
    web browser usage shares, as I'm sure you well know, since you keep on
    quoting them. This is an approximate guide to the proprotional use of
    each operating system in client-side situations such as desktop PCs,
    laptops and portable devices, but it ignores servers and other special
    purpose computers that never do any web browsing.

    The first paragraph you quoted is talking about sales of new computers,
    not the installed base. That paragraph says that 31% of new computers
    being bought by business now are running Win7. Therefore 69% of new
    computers being bought by businesses right now are NOT running Win7.

    The only reference to an "83%" is the proportion of new business
    computers purchased in a year's time which will be running Win7, not the
    NetMarketShare figures.

    New computer sales only have a slow influence on the relative share of
    the installed base of each operating system (as measured by
    NetMarketShare), since new computers sold each year are heavily
    outnumbered by the installed base. OS upgrades on existing computers
    would also have a small influence.

    The last part of the article referencing NetMarketShare is speculating
    that most businesses running Vista could easily upgrade to Windows 7,
    which would push Windows 7 up to 31% at current shares (ignoring the
    rather big point that a high proportion of those Vista users are
    probably NOT business computer users, and home users may be less
    inclined to upgrade due to the cost, until they get an automatic upgrade
    by buying a new computer).

    It then goes on to speculate that if Windows XP decreased by 1% each
    month and Windows 7 increased by 1% each month (plus all of Vista going
    to Win7) then by the end of next year (13 months away), XP would be down
    to about 46% and Win7 would be up to about 44%. If things go a little
    better than that then Win7 might have overtaken XP by the end of 2011.

    (Ignoring the steadily increasing web browser share of portable devices,
    which will push down all the PC operating systems somewhat. This won't
    affect the relative proportions between Windows versions, or the timing
    of Win7 overtaking XP.)

    I also note that the first paragraph of the article states business use
    of Win7 is about 10%. That figure is nowhere near the quoted 18% figure
    from NetMarketShare, which goes to show that you can't draw any
    conclusions about business computer usage from NetMarketShare.

    > > Aren't we already past the point where Microsoft has stopped issuing new
    > > licences for Windows XP? If so, this implies IT managers are wiping the
    > > OS that was supplied with the computer (if any) and replacing it with
    > > Windows XP from their existing licence pool, probably in many cases
    > > replacing an old PC with a new one, and using the same licence.
    > >
    > > > And in a year, Windows 7 is expected to gain over 80% of the desktop
    > > > market.

    > >
    > > 83% of new business PCs. The article says nothing about education or
    > > home computers.

    >
    > True. That would explain the subject line: "Businesses adopt Windows 7 at
    > record speed".
    >
    > As for education and home computers, the Windows 7 share is currently 21%,
    > up from 3% a year ago.
    >
    > http://www.w3counter.com/globalstats.php?year=2009&month=10
    >
    > That is also a record-setting pace of adoption, and in the midst of a global
    > recession no less. XP didn't reach 20% market share until late 2003, 14
    > months after its release.
    >
    > <http://www.conceivablytech.com/3878/business/windows-7-likely-to-surpas
    > s-windows-xp-by-summer-2011/>
    >
    > But these are just facts. I'd hate to see you change your ideologically
    > driven view of the world just on account of something like that.


    I have no ideological position in this discussion. I'm just pointing out
    how badly you are misreading and/or misrepresenting this article.

    > > This means that in a year's time, about 17% of new business PCs (less
    > > some small percentage for other OSes) will STILL be having an old XP
    > > licence installed.

    >
    > No. It means that only 17% of corporate pcs will be running XP, the
    > remainder will be running Windows 7.


    You aren't reading the article correctly.

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Nov 9, 2010
    #6
  7. In article <ibaskm$nja$>, EMB <> wrote:
    >On 9/11/2010 7:19 p.m., David Empson wrote:
    >
    >> Aren't we already past the point where Microsoft has stopped issuing new
    >> licences for Windows XP? If so, this implies IT managers are wiping the
    >> OS that was supplied with the computer (if any) and replacing it with
    >> Windows XP from their existing licence pool, probably in many cases
    >> replacing an old PC with a new one, and using the same licence.

    >
    >Windows 7 Pro and Ultimate (and Enterprise) have a permanent downgrade
    >right to XP.
    >
    ><http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/downgrade_rights.a
    >spx>


    Did the vista licences have similar ? I remember quite a few of those
    happening, but don't know if that's a right or just trying to keep customers
    from getting really grumpy. :)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Nov 9, 2010
    #7
  8. In article <1jrpwzh.12yllk6rpo5edN%>, (David Empson) wrote:
    >impossible <> wrote:

    (snip)

    >> > This means that in a year's time, about 17% of new business PCs (less
    >> > some small percentage for other OSes) will STILL be having an old XP
    >> > licence installed.

    >>
    >> No. It means that only 17% of corporate pcs will be running XP, the
    >> remainder will be running Windows 7.

    >
    >You aren't reading the article correctly.


    David, impossible is a well known ignorer of facts and user of dodgy/non
    existent stats. Suggest you give up on replying to it ... for all our sakes.
    :)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Nov 9, 2010
    #8
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