Re: BSOD

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Nathan Mercer, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. Chris Hope wrote:
    > ams67 wrote:
    >
    >
    >>No comment...Just a huge LoL!!!!
    >>http://nl2.vnunet.com/news/1160317

    >
    >
    > Were they demonstrating a beta version of the media center or something?


    No, something went wrong with the remote Gates was using or the IR
    received on the Media Centre PC

    Some comments from a Microsoftee's blog
    http://blog.seanalexander.com/ces.htm behind the scenes

    > I think I've only ever managed to make my XP totally crash once or twice
    > in a couple of years and even then it was because I was testing out
    > firewalls and hadn't fully uninstalled one before installing the other.
    >
    > You think they'd be a bit more careful when demonstrating their
    > software. Kinda makes MS a laughing stock when this sort of thing
    > happens.


    Shit happens. Even to Chief Software Architects.
    Nathan Mercer, Jan 9, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Sun, 09 Jan 2005 15:56:44 +1300, Nathan Mercer wrote:

    >> You think they'd be a bit more careful when demonstrating their
    >> software. Kinda makes MS a laughing stock when this sort of thing
    >> happens.

    >
    > Shit happens. Even to Chief Software Architects.


    I don't think I've ever seen a BSOD on one of my *nix boxen.

    I've seen a few segmentation errors tho' - but not recently.


    Divine

    --
    "Installing and running Unix hardly counts as one of the more difficult
    intellectual tasks. It's hard, sure, if you're used to something different,
    but the description 'windows people' includes novelists, artists and nuclear
    scientists who just don't give a damn about the stupid OS their computer
    runs."
    , Jan 9, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Nathan Mercer

    Italian Jobs Guest

    On 15 Jan 2005 19:34:23 -0800, "Nathan Mercer" <>
    wrote:


    >For all I know it could have even been industrial espionage
    >


    You're going to get heaps for this comment
    Italian Jobs, Jan 16, 2005
    #3
  4. ams67 wrote:
    >>>Still shouldn't cause an OS crash though, should it?


    >>The OS didn't crash whatsoever.


    > Then someone must be a liar.
    > According to:
    > http://nl2.vnunet.com/news/1160317
    > "Blue screen of death crashes Gates at CES"...
    > What can it be consider more 'OS crashed" the a nice BSOD?


    I've read this aswell, but not from any of the usual tech sites I read,
    only ones posted in this group.

    And the tech site I normally read would have made comment of it, they're
    run by a bunch of pricks who hassle anythingand everything.
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Jan 16, 2005
    #4
  5. wrote:
    >>In the Media
    >>Center demo the IR remote didn't work because of hardware issues


    > Such as ...?


    I seem to recall reading that it was IR interference... too many IR auto
    focus cameras being used that confused the poor thing.
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Jan 16, 2005
    #5
  6. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 08:15:48 +1300, Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:

    >>>In the Media
    >>>Center demo the IR remote didn't work because of hardware issues

    >
    >> Such as ...?

    >
    > I seem to recall reading that it was IR interference... too many IR auto
    > focus cameras being used that confused the poor thing.


    So why didn't they simply change frequency/channel?


    Divine

    --
    Only two people at Microsoft worked on MS-DOS 1.0. One of them, Chris
    Peters, later testified when Seattle Computer Products sued Microsoft
    concerning the purchase of QDOS: "Again, from the programmer's point of
    view, MS-DOS 1.0 was primarily a clone of CP/M."
    , Jan 17, 2005
    #6
  7. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 20:32:35 +1300, Axle wrote:

    >> So why didn't they simply change frequency/channel?

    >
    > Interference from other sources is ambient infrared, not at the
    > subcarrier frequency.


    LOL - so if it's too warm, ie too much radiant heat, then an IR remote
    won't work correctly.


    > IR receiver diodes respond over quite a wide band around 900 nanometers
    > wavelength


    So change the frequency on which it responds? Surely that is possible. I
    mean radios can do that, and can isolate desired transmissions from
    undesired interference.

    Why cannot IR links do the same?


    Divine

    --
    The Queen's Mother: "Well I don't know what all you queens are doing,
    but this old Queen wants a drink."
    , Jan 17, 2005
    #7
  8. Nathan Mercer

    Axle Guest

    wrote:
    > On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 20:32:35 +1300, Axle wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>So why didn't they simply change frequency/channel?

    >>
    >>Interference from other sources is ambient infrared, not at the
    >>subcarrier frequency.

    >
    >
    > LOL - so if it's too warm, ie too much radiant heat, then an IR remote
    > won't work correctly.


    Not exactly, but if there is a lot of emission at the wavelength that
    the receivers work at, the noise can mask the code.
    >
    >
    >
    >>IR receiver diodes respond over quite a wide band around 900 nanometers
    >>wavelength

    >
    >
    > So change the frequency on which it responds? Surely that is possible. I
    > mean radios can do that, and can isolate desired transmissions from
    > undesired interference.
    >
    > Why cannot IR links do the same?
    >


    They can do all sorts of things with optics, but not for $2 worth of
    components in a TV remote control.
    Axle, Jan 17, 2005
    #8
  9. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 21:32:56 +1300, Axle wrote:

    >> LOL - so if it's too warm, ie too much radiant heat, then an IR remote
    >> won't work correctly.

    >
    > Not exactly, but if there is a lot of emission at the wavelength that
    > the receivers work at, the noise can mask the code.


    So they should switch frequencies.


    Divine

    --
    Mhyrvold, January 5, 1989: Microsoft "preannounced Windows, signed up the
    major OEMs and showed a demo to freeze the market and prevent VisiOn from
    getting any momentum. It sure worked - VisiOn died, VisiCorp died, and DOS
    kept on chugging."
    , Jan 18, 2005
    #9
  10. Nathan Mercer

    Axle Guest

    wrote:
    > On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 21:32:56 +1300, Axle wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>LOL - so if it's too warm, ie too much radiant heat, then an IR remote
    >>>won't work correctly.

    >>
    >>Not exactly, but if there is a lot of emission at the wavelength that
    >>the receivers work at, the noise can mask the code.

    >
    >
    > So they should switch frequencies.
    >
    >
    > Divine
    >



    Imagine if someone is sending you morse code via light beam on a wall,
    now imagine if the ambient light on the wall is brighter than the light
    beam.
    Changing the rate that the light flashes will not help
    Axle, Jan 18, 2005
    #10
  11. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 21:49:11 +1300, Axle wrote:

    > Imagine if someone is sending you morse code via light beam on a wall,
    > now imagine if the ambient light on the wall is brighter than the light
    > beam.
    > Changing the rate that the light flashes will not help


    Imagine someone sending you morse code via blue light beam on a wall.

    Now imagine if the yellow ambient light on the wall is brighter than the
    light beam.

    Would you still see the beam?


    Divine

    --
    "Microsoft don't need any moral right to be a hypocrite. It's an oxymoron.
    They will do what they can get away with. Of course this makes it difficult
    for their advocates to occupy any high moral ground."
    , Jan 18, 2005
    #11
  12. wrote:
    >>Imagine if someone is sending you morse code via light beam on a wall,
    >>now imagine if the ambient light on the wall is brighter than the light
    >>beam.
    >>Changing the rate that the light flashes will not help


    > Imagine someone sending you morse code via blue light beam on a wall.
    > Now imagine if the yellow ambient light on the wall is brighter than the
    > light beam.


    > Would you still see the beam?


    depends, blue light is fairly hard to focus on :)
    but if it is the same "colour" you wont, which was the original point.

    if standing with your head in a jet engine, you're not going to hear the
    guy beside you wispering because of the noise, if he starts to yell at a
    different frequency, it isn't going to help, you still wont be able to
    hear him.

    --
    Dave.net.nz
    reply addy is e
    nice! http://www.dave.net.nz/images/link.jpg
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Jan 18, 2005
    #12
  13. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 22:22:51 +1300, Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:

    > depends, blue light is fairly hard to focus on :)
    > but if it is the same "colour" you wont, which was the original point.
    >
    > if standing with your head in a jet engine, you're not going to hear the
    > guy beside you wispering because of the noise, if he starts to yell at a
    > different frequency, it isn't going to help, you still wont be able to
    > hear him.


    But if you make a recording, and then filter out the sound of the jet
    engine then you will hear him.


    Divine

    --
    43 - for those who require slightly more than the answer to life, the universe
    and everything.
    , Jan 18, 2005
    #13
  14. wrote:
    >>depends, blue light is fairly hard to focus on :)
    >>but if it is the same "colour" you wont, which was the original point.


    >>if standing with your head in a jet engine, you're not going to hear the
    >>guy beside you wispering because of the noise, if he starts to yell at a
    >>different frequency, it isn't going to help, you still wont be able to
    >>hear him.


    > But if you make a recording, and then filter out the sound of the jet
    > engine then you will hear him.


    right, so they should have just shielded(read filtered) the whole stage
    from IR...
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Jan 18, 2005
    #14
  15. Nathan Mercer

    axel Guest

    wrote:

    > On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 21:49:11 +1300, Axle wrote:
    >
    >> Imagine if someone is sending you morse code via light beam on a wall,
    >> now imagine if the ambient light on the wall is brighter than the light
    >> beam.
    >> Changing the rate that the light flashes will not help

    >
    > Imagine someone sending you morse code via blue light beam on a wall.
    >
    > Now imagine if the yellow ambient light on the wall is brighter than the
    > light beam.
    >
    > Would you still see the beam?
    >
    >
    > Divine
    >


    Imagine if all you have is infrared leds and the drop in orbital energy that
    releases the photons is a fixed quantity, thus the wavelength of infrared
    energy is fixed in the far infrared.
    Imagine if what you have to receive the signal is a silicon photodiode with
    a broadband response and a coloured plastic filter lens.
    Imagine if the ambient infrared is as bright as the ones, how will you see
    the zeros.
    axel, Jan 18, 2005
    #15
  16. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 08:35:10 +1300, Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:

    > right, so they should have just shielded(read filtered) the whole stage
    > from IR...


    They could have shielded the sensor from IR light other than from the
    direction that Gate's remote would be pointing from.


    Divine

    --
    "What some people have against Open Source Software is what Fundamentalist
    Christians or Moslems have against Knowledge."
    , Jan 19, 2005
    #16
  17. Nathan Mercer

    axel Guest

    On 2005-01-19, <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 08:35:10 +1300, Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:
    >
    >> right, so they should have just shielded(read filtered) the whole stage
    >> from IR...

    >
    > They could have shielded the sensor from IR light other than from the
    > direction that Gate's remote would be pointing from.
    >
    >
    > Divine
    >


    Ah well theres your answer then.
    axel, Jan 19, 2005
    #17
  18. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 08:53:30 +1300, axel wrote:

    > Imagine if all you have is infrared leds and the drop in orbital energy that
    > releases the photons is a fixed quantity, thus the wavelength of infrared
    > energy is fixed in the far infrared.
    > Imagine if what you have to receive the signal is a silicon photodiode with
    > a broadband response and a coloured plastic filter lens.
    > Imagine if the ambient infrared is as bright as the ones, how will you see
    > the zeros.


    You won't - and your stupid choice for choosing equipment that was so
    indiscriminant/poorly designed!


    Divine

    --
    "Microsoft don't need any moral right to be a hypocrite. It's an oxymoron.
    They will do what they can get away with. Of course this makes it difficult
    for their advocates to occupy any high moral ground."
    , Jan 19, 2005
    #18
  19. wrote:
    >>right, so they should have just shielded(read filtered) the whole stage
    >>from IR...


    > They could have shielded the sensor from IR light other than from the
    > direction that Gate's remote would be pointing from.


    you win, you care more about this than I do.
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Jan 19, 2005
    #19
  20. Nathan Mercer

    Guest

    On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 07:35:05 +0000, axel wrote:

    >> They could have shielded the sensor from IR light other than from the
    >> direction that Gate's remote would be pointing from.

    >
    > Ah well theres your answer then.


    IOW, Micro$oft's own failure to take into account what would be happening
    around them.


    Divine

    --
    Only two people at Microsoft worked on MS-DOS 1.0. One of them, Chris
    Peters, later testified when Seattle Computer Products sued Microsoft
    concerning the purchase of QDOS: "Again, from the programmer's point of
    view, MS-DOS 1.0 was primarily a clone of CP/M."
    , Jan 21, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Moshup Trail

    Foxfire BSOD in Win98SE

    Moshup Trail, Mar 12, 2005, in forum: Firefox
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    458
    Nigel Stapley
    Mar 12, 2005
  2. Ian B

    BSOD on wireless PC

    Ian B, Dec 11, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    2,304
    Ian B
    Dec 13, 2005
  3. Bob
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    594
  4. Bob

    BSOD again..........

    Bob, Jul 3, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    628
    °Mike°
    Jul 4, 2003
  5. Bob

    BSOD part three

    Bob, Jul 5, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    799
    Shep©
    Jul 6, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page