Re: Blu-Ray Drives

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Paul, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    John wrote:
    > Is it possible to output a film in your Blu-Ray drive on your computer
    > to your tv?
    >
    >


    If you can pilot the space shuttle, you can probably get a Blu-Ray to play
    on your TV set.

    http://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Monito...HDMI-connected-HD-TV/m-p/68711/highlight/true

    I don't know why this stuff has to be so tough to do. (I'm just a little
    pissed at the progress I'm making on my own little project right now.)

    Blu-Ray implies high definition content. And HD content usually invokes some
    measure of Protected Audio Path or Protected Video Path. It's just possible
    that a player application will refuse to play at all, if the path isn't there.
    Alternately, the movie may not play on two display devices at once, and one
    of the posts in the HP.com thread had to do with a laptop user forcing all
    output to the external video connector.

    So while some multimedia savvy users might say "oh, piece of cake" when
    asked how easy it is, the computer can still put up a good fight. You'll
    just have to work through the issues one at a time.

    The first step, will be deciding what kind of TV to use, and what
    connector on the TV you plan on using. An HDMI connector (with support
    on both the video card and the TV set, for HDCP), provides a digital
    path for the image (lossless) as well as being a protected path.
    HDCP provides a means to encrypt the signal, which is how the movie
    industry wants it sent over the cable to the TV set. You could try
    a VGA connector for example, but that isn't a protected path, so the
    player application may have to do something to degrade the picture,
    once more than a certain resolution is used.

    This article is a bit dated now, but it explains the ideas a bit. If
    you had a HD TV set now, chances are it would have support for a
    protected video path, because otherwise there wouldn't be much point
    in having connectors for things like computers on it. The qualities
    of the TV would be largely wasted, if a low res picture is all you
    could get.

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/122738/most_monitors_wont_play_new_hd_video.html

    They make it sound here, like the software is friendly and
    will tell you what is broken. But don't count on it.

    http://anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=2874&p=2

    Good luck,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Jan 3, 2010
    #1
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  2. "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:hhphc7$lap$-september.org...
    > John wrote:
    >> Is it possible to output a film in your Blu-Ray drive on your computer
    >> to your tv?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > If you can pilot the space shuttle, you can probably get a Blu-Ray to play
    > on your TV set.
    >
    > http://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Monito...HDMI-connected-HD-TV/m-p/68711/highlight/true
    >
    > I don't know why this stuff has to be so tough to do. (I'm just a little
    > pissed at the progress I'm making on my own little project right now.)
    >
    > Blu-Ray implies high definition content. And HD content usually invokes
    > some
    > measure of Protected Audio Path or Protected Video Path. It's just
    > possible
    > that a player application will refuse to play at all, if the path isn't
    > there.
    > Alternately, the movie may not play on two display devices at once, and
    > one
    > of the posts in the HP.com thread had to do with a laptop user forcing all
    > output to the external video connector.
    >
    > So while some multimedia savvy users might say "oh, piece of cake" when
    > asked how easy it is, the computer can still put up a good fight. You'll
    > just have to work through the issues one at a time.
    >
    > The first step, will be deciding what kind of TV to use, and what
    > connector on the TV you plan on using. An HDMI connector (with support
    > on both the video card and the TV set, for HDCP), provides a digital
    > path for the image (lossless) as well as being a protected path.
    > HDCP provides a means to encrypt the signal, which is how the movie
    > industry wants it sent over the cable to the TV set. You could try
    > a VGA connector for example, but that isn't a protected path, so the
    > player application may have to do something to degrade the picture,
    > once more than a certain resolution is used.
    >
    > This article is a bit dated now, but it explains the ideas a bit. If
    > you had a HD TV set now, chances are it would have support for a
    > protected video path, because otherwise there wouldn't be much point
    > in having connectors for things like computers on it. The qualities
    > of the TV would be largely wasted, if a low res picture is all you
    > could get.
    >
    > http://www.pcworld.com/article/122738/most_monitors_wont_play_new_hd_video.html
    >
    > They make it sound here, like the software is friendly and
    > will tell you what is broken. But don't count on it.
    >
    > http://anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=2874&p=2
    >
    > Good luck,
    > Paul



    TRYING TO NOT SOUND ARGUMENTATIVE ...

    I would expect a computer with a blu-ray to be able to play on the TV set if
    the computer has a DVI jack or an HDMI jack. I understand from your comments
    that this is not true, or not always true. What you are saying is
    counter-intuitive.

    After all of that, I've got no experience at this, but I would have
    connected the DVI or HDMI cable from the computer to the TV, and let 'er
    rip. If there was no DVI output, or HDMI output on the computer, then I
    would expect the blu-ray to not play through to the TV.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jan 3, 2010
    #2
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