Re: Best way to get large files from a friend?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by DaveS, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. DaveS

    DaveS Guest

    On 4/10/2013 4:05 PM, Alan Browne wrote:
    > On 2013.04.10 11:09 , Jennifer Murphy wrote:
    >> I use DropBox to send large files to other people. I just create a
    >> DropBox folder and send them a link (URL) where they can download the
    >> files. They don;pt have to install anything on their computers or join
    >> anything.
    >>
    >> DropBox doesn't have anything that works as well in reverse.
    >> Is ther a file sharing service that will allow me to send a friend a
    >> link where they can go to upload files to my account in the cloud
    >> without having to join anything or install anything?

    >
    > I used to use
    > http://www.yousendit.com/compare-plans
    > Which has a free plan up to 50MB file size and up to 2 GB at a time
    > online. The sender uploads the file there with destination e-mail
    > address(es). The receiver gets a link and pulls the file. Transaction
    > is over.
    >
    > Since DropBox I haven't used yousendit at all.
    >
    > Your point is valid of course, but I believe the "Dropbox" era is here
    > and should be no more daunting to users than e-mail. Once they try it
    > and use it a few times they'll get over their reluctance.
    >
    > (There are others besides Dropbox).
    >


    BitDefender has detected malware on that page.

    Dave S.
    DaveS, Apr 11, 2013
    #1
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  2. DaveS

    nospam Guest

    In article <kk4u95$ga6$>, DaveS <>
    wrote:

    > BitDefender has detected malware on that page.


    false positive.
    nospam, Apr 11, 2013
    #2
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  3. DaveS

    DaveS Guest

    On 4/10/2013 10:22 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <kk4u95$ga6$>, DaveS <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> BitDefender has detected malware on that page.

    >
    > false positive.
    >


    How do you know that?

    Dave S.
    DaveS, Apr 11, 2013
    #3
  4. DaveS

    nospam Guest

    In article <kk6rp5$201$>, DaveS <>
    wrote:

    > >> BitDefender has detected malware on that page.

    > >
    > > false positive.

    >
    > How do you know that?


    because it's an established service that's been around for many years.
    i first heard of it about 8 years ago.

    web of trust rates it highly:
    <http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/yousendit.com>

    it's possible that someone could send malware using the service, but
    they could send it directly too. don't click on links from untrusted
    sources.

    their website could also be hacked, but so could the new york times. in
    fact, the ny times was hacked a few years ago with a rogue ad that was
    malware.
    nospam, Apr 11, 2013
    #4
  5. DaveS

    DaveS Guest

    On 4/11/2013 12:55 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <kk6rp5$201$>, DaveS <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>>> BitDefender has detected malware on that page.
    >>>
    >>> false positive.

    >>
    >> How do you know that?

    >
    > because it's an established service that's been around for many years.
    > i first heard of it about 8 years ago.
    >
    > web of trust rates it highly:
    > <http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/yousendit.com>
    >
    > it's possible that someone could send malware using the service, but
    > they could send it directly too. don't click on links from untrusted
    > sources.
    >
    > their website could also be hacked, but so could the new york times. in
    > fact, the ny times was hacked a few years ago with a rogue ad that was
    > malware.
    >


    I think you don't understand how a web page gets infected.
    It has nothing to do with the owners of the site, nor their reputation.

    Hackers can place malware on almost any site, just waiting for you to
    click the activation location.

    Dave S.
    DaveS, Apr 11, 2013
    #5
  6. DaveS

    nospam Guest

    In article <kk7bt2$qu6$>, DaveS <>
    wrote:

    > >>>> BitDefender has detected malware on that page.
    > >>>
    > >>> false positive.
    > >>
    > >> How do you know that?

    > >
    > > because it's an established service that's been around for many years.
    > > i first heard of it about 8 years ago.
    > >
    > > web of trust rates it highly:
    > > <http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/yousendit.com>
    > >
    > > it's possible that someone could send malware using the service, but
    > > they could send it directly too. don't click on links from untrusted
    > > sources.
    > >
    > > their website could also be hacked, but so could the new york times. in
    > > fact, the ny times was hacked a few years ago with a rogue ad that was
    > > malware.

    >
    > I think you don't understand how a web page gets infected.


    then you think wrong.

    > It has nothing to do with the owners of the site, nor their reputation.


    sometimes it does. not always though.

    > Hackers can place malware on almost any site, just waiting for you to
    > click the activation location.


    which is why i mentioned the new york times being hacked.

    a more recent one was a reputable iphone developer site.
    nospam, Apr 11, 2013
    #6
  7. DaveS

    DaveS Guest

    On 4/11/2013 5:28 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <kk7bt2$qu6$>, DaveS <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>>>>> BitDefender has detected malware on that page.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> false positive.
    >>>>
    >>>> How do you know that?
    >>>
    >>> because it's an established service that's been around for many years.
    >>> i first heard of it about 8 years ago.
    >>>
    >>> web of trust rates it highly:
    >>> <http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/yousendit.com>
    >>>
    >>> it's possible that someone could send malware using the service, but
    >>> they could send it directly too. don't click on links from untrusted
    >>> sources.
    >>>
    >>> their website could also be hacked, but so could the new york times. in
    >>> fact, the ny times was hacked a few years ago with a rogue ad that was
    >>> malware.

    >>
    >> I think you don't understand how a web page gets infected.

    >
    > then you think wrong.
    >
    >> It has nothing to do with the owners of the site, nor their reputation.

    >
    > sometimes it does. not always though.
    >
    >> Hackers can place malware on almost any site, just waiting for you to
    >> click the activation location.

    >
    > which is why i mentioned the new york times being hacked.
    >
    > a more recent one was a reputable iphone developer site.
    >


    So take a second shot at answering my question.
    You blew the first chance.

    How do you know it is a false positive?

    Dave S.
    DaveS, Apr 12, 2013
    #7
  8. DaveS

    nospam Guest

    In article <kk7hj4$tfe$>, DaveS <>
    wrote:

    > >>>>>> BitDefender has detected malware on that page.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> false positive.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> How do you know that?
    > >>>
    > >>> because it's an established service that's been around for many years.
    > >>> i first heard of it about 8 years ago.
    > >>>
    > >>> web of trust rates it highly:
    > >>> <http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/yousendit.com>
    > >>>
    > >>> it's possible that someone could send malware using the service, but
    > >>> they could send it directly too. don't click on links from untrusted
    > >>> sources.
    > >>>
    > >>> their website could also be hacked, but so could the new york times. in
    > >>> fact, the ny times was hacked a few years ago with a rogue ad that was
    > >>> malware.
    > >>
    > >> I think you don't understand how a web page gets infected.

    > >
    > > then you think wrong.
    > >
    > >> It has nothing to do with the owners of the site, nor their reputation.

    > >
    > > sometimes it does. not always though.
    > >
    > >> Hackers can place malware on almost any site, just waiting for you to
    > >> click the activation location.

    > >
    > > which is why i mentioned the new york times being hacked.
    > >
    > > a more recent one was a reputable iphone developer site.

    >
    > So take a second shot at answering my question.
    > You blew the first chance.


    i did not.

    > How do you know it is a false positive?


    already answered.

    how about you tell us what specific malware is there and what it does.

    if it's not a false positive, then there will be something there for
    you to identify.

    it also looks like it's very common to get a false positive. there are
    five threads in their forums from yesterday alone! based on reading a
    couple of them, they blacklist sites rather than actually check for
    anything and they respond with the same canned answer each time.

    <http://forum.bitdefender.com/index.php?showforum=138>
    nospam, Apr 12, 2013
    #8
  9. DaveS

    gregz Guest

    DaveS <> wrote:
    > On 4/11/2013 12:55 PM, nospam wrote:
    >> In article <kk6rp5$201$>, DaveS <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>>> BitDefender has detected malware on that page.
    >>>>
    >>>> false positive.
    >>>
    >>> How do you know that?

    >>
    >> because it's an established service that's been around for many years.
    >> i first heard of it about 8 years ago.
    >>
    >> web of trust rates it highly:
    >> <http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/yousendit.com>
    >>
    >> it's possible that someone could send malware using the service, but
    >> they could send it directly too. don't click on links from untrusted
    >> sources.
    >>
    >> their website could also be hacked, but so could the new york times. in
    >> fact, the ny times was hacked a few years ago with a rogue ad that was
    >> malware.
    >>

    >
    > I think you don't understand how a web page gets infected.
    > It has nothing to do with the owners of the site, nor their reputation.
    >
    > Hackers can place malware on almost any site, just waiting for you to
    > click the activation location.
    >
    > Dave S.


    One of my sites, the one I have unlimited space, somehow got a php file
    put in there next to my index file. Wasn't me. Norton or others began
    saying the site was infected. This would not be a problem unless a browser
    selected that php file instead of HTML. I deleted the file, changed
    passwords and all was good. I can back up computer files. Most importantly,
    I have no limit on picture size. I hate those little picture sites, how
    immature. I once had a FTP server set up with guest account activated. One
    day I noticed the uploading of a file, a movie. From the movie gods. After
    the movie was uploaded, I noticed several remotes beginning to download.
    I shut down the guest. The movie, face off. Steal have that compressed cd
    format.

    Greg
    gregz, Apr 12, 2013
    #9
  10. DaveS

    DaveS Guest

    On 4/11/2013 7:10 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <kk7hj4$tfe$>, DaveS <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>>>>>>> BitDefender has detected malware on that page.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> false positive.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> How do you know that?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> because it's an established service that's been around for many years.
    >>>>> i first heard of it about 8 years ago.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> web of trust rates it highly:
    >>>>> <http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/yousendit.com>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> it's possible that someone could send malware using the service, but
    >>>>> they could send it directly too. don't click on links from untrusted
    >>>>> sources.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> their website could also be hacked, but so could the new york times. in
    >>>>> fact, the ny times was hacked a few years ago with a rogue ad that was
    >>>>> malware.
    >>>>
    >>>> I think you don't understand how a web page gets infected.
    >>>
    >>> then you think wrong.
    >>>
    >>>> It has nothing to do with the owners of the site, nor their reputation.
    >>>
    >>> sometimes it does. not always though.
    >>>
    >>>> Hackers can place malware on almost any site, just waiting for you to
    >>>> click the activation location.
    >>>
    >>> which is why i mentioned the new york times being hacked.
    >>>
    >>> a more recent one was a reputable iphone developer site.

    >>
    >> So take a second shot at answering my question.
    >> You blew the first chance.

    >
    > i did not.
    >
    >> How do you know it is a false positive?

    >
    > already answered.


    Non-responsive.

    Goodbye.

    Dave S.
    DaveS, Apr 12, 2013
    #10
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