Re: Best approach to a new PC with no room for partitioning

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Carlos, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. Carlos

    Carlos Guest

    On Jan 14, 12:18 am, "Robert Carnegie: Fnord: cc talk-
    " <> wrote:
    > Hi, I'm a new user of Windows 7 Home Premium, 64-bit - but without the
    > CDs - and I have an issue setting up the PC the way that I want it.
    >
    > I'm accustomed to running Windows XP with a "small" Windows and
    > programs partition, say 15 gigabytes, and most of the rest of the disk
    > a separate "data" partition, including for video files.  Of course,
    > the data partition can be mounted onto a folder on the Windows volume.
    >
    > This mainly pleases me by allowing me to use a non-Windows backup
    > tool, such as the Linux SystemRescueCD and partimage program (which
    > also backs up the MBR and patition table), to make a backup of the
    > Windows volume itself, as a volume.  In theory, if something bad
    > happens to the Windows system, including corruption, or deleting vital
    > files, or even the hard disk failing, I can restore the system to its
    > previous state, and I have.  And files on the "data" partition can be
    > simply copied as files, to back up.  The page file can live on the
    > data volume, as well, mainly to save space on the Windows volume or on
    > its backups.  The hibernation file, I am stuck with, except for
    > disabling hibernation in order to delete the file while a backup is
    > made.
    >
    > I am also confident using tools such as GParted to resize and move
    > partitions - once I've got a backup - and MyDefrag, with certain ideas
    > about the optimum locations for particular files.
    >
    > But on my brand new HP TouchSmart TM2-1010EA, with Windows 7 Home
    > Premium 64-Bit, I'm stuck, and looking for guidance on my next move.
    > Because four apparently necessary MBR partitions already exist.
    >
    > Windows got configured when I first switched the machine on.  It isn't
    > provided on CD or DVD.  I have been able to back it up - I assume -
    > using SystemRescueCD, although booting the machine from other Linux
    > CDs is not reliable.  I was able to run Ubuntu after having it copy
    > itself to a USB Flash memory stick, with another PC.
    >
    > The partitions are:
    >
    > - "SYSTEM" of around 200 MEGAbytes, NTFS.  I gather that this is
    > suitable for a two-tier installation using EFI and/or GPT partition
    > table instead of MBR, but here it may be redundant.
    >
    > - Windows partition of about 280 GIGAbytes, NTFS, with 30 gigabytes
    > used.
    >
    > - "RECOVERY" partition of about 17 GIGAbytes, NTFS, 2.8 GB used.
    >
    > - "HP_TOOLS" partition of 99.3 MEGAbytes, FAT32, 92.7 MB used.  This
    > contains some files named "*.EFI" which /may/ be a hint that the PC
    > can be booted into a Hewlett-Packard repair or diagnostic mode IF
    > these items are left alone.
    >
    > So I can't just shrink the Windows volume and add another partition in
    > the space released - right? - because you can only have four.
    >
    > So, what should I do?  Cheaply?
    >
    > If I can obtain real Windows discs to install from scratch, I can do
    > it more the way that I want, can't I?  Can I get a disc or discs -
    > legally - without laying out serious money?
    >
    > If I can magically convert the Windows volume to an extended partition
    > and have it still work, then I believe I can proceed to shrink it,
    > also. and then re-use the space.
    >
    > Likewise if I can delete, move, and re-create as extended the Recovery
    > partition.
    >
    > I could disable the HP_TOOLS partition but leave its data on disc, and
    > use its partition number to make a "data" volume in free space from
    > the Windows volume.  Then reverse the process if I need the tools.
    > Alternatively, maybe I can obtain the tools on a CD., Or, the thing
    > takes SD cards, although I don't know if it'll boot from one.
    >
    > Maybe there's a magic wand  that I can wave to convert the disk to GPT
    > partitioning and have as many partitions as I can think of, but then
    > how much of the software would not work any more?
    >
    > Please enlighten me: what is my best choice to achieve the sort of
    > disk design that I want?  Are there more options?
    >
    > Also, Linux thinks the Windows volume has about 170 gigabytes in use,
    > what's going on there!  There is only one system restore point, dating
    > from when I first booted and let Windows install itself.


    Hi,
    My HP CQ122-LA has a similar structure.
    I shrunk the Windows partition in order to leave enough room for
    creating my data partition.
    And that was it.
    Carlos
    Carlos, Jan 14, 2011
    #1
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