Re: becoming authroized technician

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Solomon Kozanski, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. authorized? you're assuming this field is regulated in some fashion...

    its more or less "certified", which means some random organization
    arbitrarily declares you to be "certified" to do some particular task.

    www.comptia.org and microsoft (a trade organization and a for-profit
    corporation, respectively) issue certifications for various things, which in
    practice means you can go get a job for x number of bucks over and above
    minimum wage, but in reality mean diddley squat (how many of these
    non-degreed MCSEs and A+ guys actually know how to *program* a computer, let
    alone tell you what a register file is and why it is important to
    superscalar microprocessors?)

    it basically goes like this: a+ means you know the hardware and how to use
    the OSs. its useful in that:

    1) you have some semblance of an understanding of the ever increasing
    complexity of PC (and by extension, mac/sun/cray/whatever) hardware and
    microtrash's ever growing line of bloated, buggy operating virii;

    2) you can get a job making a pitiful $25K in the computer industry
    (although not as pathetic as $10K at mcfat's);

    3) its a start towards other comptia certs which could get you pay
    increases and teach you things

    microsoft's certs, on the other hand, are a big racket. they teach you
    absolutely nothing but how to point and click, what those pointing and
    clickings do in a nutshell (without the necessary underlying computer
    theory: we "know" what public key encryption is, but do we actually
    understand the fundamental mathematics?!), and allow you to con someone into
    paying you $60K to do something any nerdy 12 year old could do. don't assume
    i'm against this highly profitable racket, i merely recognize BS when i see
    it. in essence, MCSEs erroneously refer to themselves as 'engineers', which
    is actually the fault of multiplesclerosis (which has legal implications in
    some states, btw), and point and click and know absolutely nothing about
    REAL computer science.

    then you got your MCSAs and MCSDs, the former sits around and fixes problems
    from the bugware nobody in his right mind would install on his PC (nobody in
    his right mind would *own* a PC!). they get paid tons of money and are yet
    another added expense to being mercifully granted a license for the
    privilege of using ms's crap. the latter are mostly computer programmers who
    actually went to college, actually know something about IS, and had to go
    get this stupid microcrap cert because personnel managers across the nation
    were conned into believing a rubber stamp from the world's greatest
    programmer, bill gates, is more credible than a degree from an accredited
    institution of higher learning.

    certifications, as comptia conducts them, are a useful measuring stick of
    what people actually know, and can be very handy in separating the wheat
    from the chaff in jobs. as far as comptia and mcp, they also help to
    establish a precedent where IS folks earn real money (as opposed to "you
    program my cray for $6.50/hour") and tend to help the economy in general. as
    far as mcp itself, it only creates a class of lazy know-nothings who suck
    off the economic teat, which is unfortunate (for them, not me).

    that's it in a nutshell. i'd say go for the money, just don't believe the
    hype. get an MCSE, go BS some guy into giving you 60K a year, sit back, have
    a cigar, and point and click your way to a mercedes (may the protestant work
    ethic ROT)... and by the way, don't EVER let the uninitiated know the real
    truth!

    oh, and as far as "authorized service technicians" go, i'd like to point out
    that i'm a kozanski authorized hypercomputational mainframe super duper
    symmetrically turbocharged and multithreaded a-plusso service with a cherry
    on top technician. if that means anything. oh and i have MCSXAUIRYEWUIH
    certification. (somewhere along the line i got a PhD in mathematics, but
    that's not relevent to the job market)

    happy scamming!
    --
    Brought to you courtesy of Kozanski's Morgue & Grill

    "Drew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All:
    >
    > Is anyone here an Authorized Service Technician for any of the
    > computer companies? In particular, I was interested in doing this
    > with Dell but I can't find any information on their web site about it.
    > Does anyone know how one becomes certified to do this or has anyone
    > done it before? Would Dell only farm this out to companies maybe?
    >
    > Thanks for any info!
    >
    > Drew
    >
    Solomon Kozanski, Jul 21, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 10:41:56 -0400, "Solomon Kozanski"
    <> wrote:

    >authorized? you're assuming this field is regulated in some fashion...
    >
    >its more or less "certified", which means some random organization
    >arbitrarily declares you to be "certified" to do some particular task.


    Uh oh...I think someone responded to the subject line rather than the
    post. :)

    Tom

    >
    >www.comptia.org and microsoft (a trade organization and a for-profit
    >corporation, respectively) issue certifications for various things, which in
    >practice means you can go get a job for x number of bucks over and above
    >minimum wage, but in reality mean diddley squat (how many of these
    >non-degreed MCSEs and A+ guys actually know how to *program* a computer, let
    >alone tell you what a register file is and why it is important to
    >superscalar microprocessors?)
    >
    >it basically goes like this: a+ means you know the hardware and how to use
    >the OSs. its useful in that:
    >
    > 1) you have some semblance of an understanding of the ever increasing
    >complexity of PC (and by extension, mac/sun/cray/whatever) hardware and
    >microtrash's ever growing line of bloated, buggy operating virii;
    >
    > 2) you can get a job making a pitiful $25K in the computer industry
    >(although not as pathetic as $10K at mcfat's);
    >
    > 3) its a start towards other comptia certs which could get you pay
    >increases and teach you things
    >
    >microsoft's certs, on the other hand, are a big racket. they teach you
    >absolutely nothing but how to point and click, what those pointing and
    >clickings do in a nutshell (without the necessary underlying computer
    >theory: we "know" what public key encryption is, but do we actually
    >understand the fundamental mathematics?!), and allow you to con someone into
    >paying you $60K to do something any nerdy 12 year old could do. don't assume
    >i'm against this highly profitable racket, i merely recognize BS when i see
    >it. in essence, MCSEs erroneously refer to themselves as 'engineers', which
    >is actually the fault of multiplesclerosis (which has legal implications in
    >some states, btw), and point and click and know absolutely nothing about
    >REAL computer science.
    >
    >then you got your MCSAs and MCSDs, the former sits around and fixes problems
    >from the bugware nobody in his right mind would install on his PC (nobody in
    >his right mind would *own* a PC!). they get paid tons of money and are yet
    >another added expense to being mercifully granted a license for the
    >privilege of using ms's crap. the latter are mostly computer programmers who
    >actually went to college, actually know something about IS, and had to go
    >get this stupid microcrap cert because personnel managers across the nation
    >were conned into believing a rubber stamp from the world's greatest
    >programmer, bill gates, is more credible than a degree from an accredited
    >institution of higher learning.
    >
    >certifications, as comptia conducts them, are a useful measuring stick of
    >what people actually know, and can be very handy in separating the wheat
    >from the chaff in jobs. as far as comptia and mcp, they also help to
    >establish a precedent where IS folks earn real money (as opposed to "you
    >program my cray for $6.50/hour") and tend to help the economy in general. as
    >far as mcp itself, it only creates a class of lazy know-nothings who suck
    >off the economic teat, which is unfortunate (for them, not me).
    >
    >that's it in a nutshell. i'd say go for the money, just don't believe the
    >hype. get an MCSE, go BS some guy into giving you 60K a year, sit back, have
    >a cigar, and point and click your way to a mercedes (may the protestant work
    >ethic ROT)... and by the way, don't EVER let the uninitiated know the real
    >truth!
    >
    >oh, and as far as "authorized service technicians" go, i'd like to point out
    >that i'm a kozanski authorized hypercomputational mainframe super duper
    >symmetrically turbocharged and multithreaded a-plusso service with a cherry
    >on top technician. if that means anything. oh and i have MCSXAUIRYEWUIH
    >certification. (somewhere along the line i got a PhD in mathematics, but
    >that's not relevent to the job market)
    >
    >happy scamming!
    Tom MacIntyre, Jul 21, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 13:31:12 -0400, Drew <> wrote:

    >
    >Thanks for a useless and insulting post. I was simply asking what
    >Dell wanted technicians that get sent out on repair calls to have in
    >the way of credentials. I didn't say anthing about what you've ranted
    >about here. Have a drink and chill out.
    >
    >On the other hand, I'd like to think the guy that posted a mature,
    >intelligent answer to my question.
    >
    >Drew
    >


    I can't answer your question, but when I was in consumer electronics
    repair, and we had a specific brand that we supported while under
    warranty, the word "authorized" was the word used to describe our shop
    technicians.

    He/she didn't reply to your post, it was the subject line that was
    replied to.

    Tom

    >
    >
    >On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 10:41:56 -0400, "Solomon Kozanski"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>authorized? you're assuming this field is regulated in some fashion...
    >>
    >>its more or less "certified", which means some random organization
    >>arbitrarily declares you to be "certified" to do some particular task.
    >>
    >>www.comptia.org and microsoft (a trade organization and a for-profit
    >>corporation, respectively) issue certifications for various things, which in
    >>practice means you can go get a job for x number of bucks over and above
    >>minimum wage, but in reality mean diddley squat (how many of these
    >>non-degreed MCSEs and A+ guys actually know how to *program* a computer, let
    >>alone tell you what a register file is and why it is important to
    >>superscalar microprocessors?)
    >>
    >>it basically goes like this: a+ means you know the hardware and how to use
    >>the OSs. its useful in that:
    >>
    >> 1) you have some semblance of an understanding of the ever increasing
    >>complexity of PC (and by extension, mac/sun/cray/whatever) hardware and
    >>microtrash's ever growing line of bloated, buggy operating virii;
    >>
    >> 2) you can get a job making a pitiful $25K in the computer industry
    >>(although not as pathetic as $10K at mcfat's);
    >>
    >> 3) its a start towards other comptia certs which could get you pay
    >>increases and teach you things
    >>
    >>microsoft's certs, on the other hand, are a big racket. they teach you
    >>absolutely nothing but how to point and click, what those pointing and
    >>clickings do in a nutshell (without the necessary underlying computer
    >>theory: we "know" what public key encryption is, but do we actually
    >>understand the fundamental mathematics?!), and allow you to con someone into
    >>paying you $60K to do something any nerdy 12 year old could do. don't assume
    >>i'm against this highly profitable racket, i merely recognize BS when i see
    >>it. in essence, MCSEs erroneously refer to themselves as 'engineers', which
    >>is actually the fault of multiplesclerosis (which has legal implications in
    >>some states, btw), and point and click and know absolutely nothing about
    >>REAL computer science.
    >>
    >>then you got your MCSAs and MCSDs, the former sits around and fixes problems
    >>from the bugware nobody in his right mind would install on his PC (nobody in
    >>his right mind would *own* a PC!). they get paid tons of money and are yet
    >>another added expense to being mercifully granted a license for the
    >>privilege of using ms's crap. the latter are mostly computer programmers who
    >>actually went to college, actually know something about IS, and had to go
    >>get this stupid microcrap cert because personnel managers across the nation
    >>were conned into believing a rubber stamp from the world's greatest
    >>programmer, bill gates, is more credible than a degree from an accredited
    >>institution of higher learning.
    >>
    >>certifications, as comptia conducts them, are a useful measuring stick of
    >>what people actually know, and can be very handy in separating the wheat
    >>from the chaff in jobs. as far as comptia and mcp, they also help to
    >>establish a precedent where IS folks earn real money (as opposed to "you
    >>program my cray for $6.50/hour") and tend to help the economy in general. as
    >>far as mcp itself, it only creates a class of lazy know-nothings who suck
    >>off the economic teat, which is unfortunate (for them, not me).
    >>
    >>that's it in a nutshell. i'd say go for the money, just don't believe the
    >>hype. get an MCSE, go BS some guy into giving you 60K a year, sit back, have
    >>a cigar, and point and click your way to a mercedes (may the protestant work
    >>ethic ROT)... and by the way, don't EVER let the uninitiated know the real
    >>truth!
    >>
    >>oh, and as far as "authorized service technicians" go, i'd like to point out
    >>that i'm a kozanski authorized hypercomputational mainframe super duper
    >>symmetrically turbocharged and multithreaded a-plusso service with a cherry
    >>on top technician. if that means anything. oh and i have MCSXAUIRYEWUIH
    >>certification. (somewhere along the line i got a PhD in mathematics, but
    >>that's not relevent to the job market)
    >>
    >>happy scamming!
    Tom MacIntyre, Jul 21, 2004
    #3
  4. actually i did reply to your question; dell, like most IT companies, uses
    the comptia certs, notably, the A+ cert, which, as i said before, shows you
    know hardware and basic OS ops. they *may* have their own in-house
    certification program, but that depends on how proprietary their hardware
    is.

    btw, thanks for the suggestion of having a drink. i'll do that now that i've
    written yet another mature, intelligent answer to your questions.
    --
    Brought to you courtesy of Kozanski's Morgue & Grill

    "Drew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Thanks for a useless and insulting post. I was simply asking what
    > Dell wanted technicians that get sent out on repair calls to have in
    > the way of credentials. I didn't say anthing about what you've ranted
    > about here. Have a drink and chill out.
    >
    > On the other hand, I'd like to think the guy that posted a mature,
    > intelligent answer to my question.
    >
    > Drew
    >
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 10:41:56 -0400, "Solomon Kozanski"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >authorized? you're assuming this field is regulated in some fashion...
    > >
    > >its more or less "certified", which means some random organization
    > >arbitrarily declares you to be "certified" to do some particular task.
    > >
    > >www.comptia.org and microsoft (a trade organization and a for-profit
    > >corporation, respectively) issue certifications for various things, which

    in
    > >practice means you can go get a job for x number of bucks over and above
    > >minimum wage, but in reality mean diddley squat (how many of these
    > >non-degreed MCSEs and A+ guys actually know how to *program* a computer,

    let
    > >alone tell you what a register file is and why it is important to
    > >superscalar microprocessors?)
    > >
    > >it basically goes like this: a+ means you know the hardware and how to

    use
    > >the OSs. its useful in that:
    > >
    > > 1) you have some semblance of an understanding of the ever increasing
    > >complexity of PC (and by extension, mac/sun/cray/whatever) hardware and
    > >microtrash's ever growing line of bloated, buggy operating virii;
    > >
    > > 2) you can get a job making a pitiful $25K in the computer industry
    > >(although not as pathetic as $10K at mcfat's);
    > >
    > > 3) its a start towards other comptia certs which could get you pay
    > >increases and teach you things
    > >
    > >microsoft's certs, on the other hand, are a big racket. they teach you
    > >absolutely nothing but how to point and click, what those pointing and
    > >clickings do in a nutshell (without the necessary underlying computer
    > >theory: we "know" what public key encryption is, but do we actually
    > >understand the fundamental mathematics?!), and allow you to con someone

    into
    > >paying you $60K to do something any nerdy 12 year old could do. don't

    assume
    > >i'm against this highly profitable racket, i merely recognize BS when i

    see
    > >it. in essence, MCSEs erroneously refer to themselves as 'engineers',

    which
    > >is actually the fault of multiplesclerosis (which has legal implications

    in
    > >some states, btw), and point and click and know absolutely nothing about
    > >REAL computer science.
    > >
    > >then you got your MCSAs and MCSDs, the former sits around and fixes

    problems
    > >from the bugware nobody in his right mind would install on his PC (nobody

    in
    > >his right mind would *own* a PC!). they get paid tons of money and are

    yet
    > >another added expense to being mercifully granted a license for the
    > >privilege of using ms's crap. the latter are mostly computer programmers

    who
    > >actually went to college, actually know something about IS, and had to go
    > >get this stupid microcrap cert because personnel managers across the

    nation
    > >were conned into believing a rubber stamp from the world's greatest
    > >programmer, bill gates, is more credible than a degree from an accredited
    > >institution of higher learning.
    > >
    > >certifications, as comptia conducts them, are a useful measuring stick of
    > >what people actually know, and can be very handy in separating the wheat
    > >from the chaff in jobs. as far as comptia and mcp, they also help to
    > >establish a precedent where IS folks earn real money (as opposed to "you
    > >program my cray for $6.50/hour") and tend to help the economy in general.

    as
    > >far as mcp itself, it only creates a class of lazy know-nothings who suck
    > >off the economic teat, which is unfortunate (for them, not me).
    > >
    > >that's it in a nutshell. i'd say go for the money, just don't believe the
    > >hype. get an MCSE, go BS some guy into giving you 60K a year, sit back,

    have
    > >a cigar, and point and click your way to a mercedes (may the protestant

    work
    > >ethic ROT)... and by the way, don't EVER let the uninitiated know the

    real
    > >truth!
    > >
    > >oh, and as far as "authorized service technicians" go, i'd like to point

    out
    > >that i'm a kozanski authorized hypercomputational mainframe super duper
    > >symmetrically turbocharged and multithreaded a-plusso service with a

    cherry
    > >on top technician. if that means anything. oh and i have MCSXAUIRYEWUIH
    > >certification. (somewhere along the line i got a PhD in mathematics, but
    > >that's not relevent to the job market)
    > >
    > >happy scamming!

    >
    Solomon Kozanski, Jul 22, 2004
    #4
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