Re: Asus eee sub-notebook?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. In article <48504d84$>, vitw did write:

    > But I won't be touching any of them with a barge-pole until they come
    > with standard touch-screen.


    The touchscreen concept goes back over 30 years. There's a never-ending line
    of bright sparks who keep saying, as though they thought of it first: "Why
    don't we build a touchscreen machine?". Except every time they try it, they
    rediscover the same old problems:

    1) The human finger is a lot fatter than most of the things you're trying to
    point to, particularly on a small screen.
    2) Human skin emits sweat and oils which create a grime buildup.
    Touchscreens get dirty quickly.

    These are not fixable, because they are not technological problems--not
    until someone comes up with a way to redesign the human body.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 12, 2008
    #1
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  2. On Jun 12, 12:54 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    > In article <>, vitw did write:
    >
    > > But I won't be touching any of them with a barge-pole until they come
    > > with standard touch-screen.

    >
    > The touchscreen concept goes back over 30 years. There's a never-ending line
    > of bright sparks who keep saying, as though they thought of it first: "Why
    > don't we build a touchscreen machine?". Except every time they try it, they
    > rediscover the same old problems:
    >
    > 1) The human finger is a lot fatter than most of the things you're trying to
    > point to, particularly on a small screen.
    > 2) Human skin emits sweat and oils which create a grime buildup.
    > Touchscreens get dirty quickly.
    >
    > These are not fixable, because they are not technological problems--not
    > until someone comes up with a way to redesign the human body.


    There is one light on the horizon: Multi-touch screens.

    These actually fill a usability gap. If you've used the iPhone for
    example, you'll know how intuitive it is to be able to manipulate
    something as if it really were on a surface. Of course, their on-
    screen keyboard is as hard to use as every other touchscreen keyboard
    ever made, but it's a PHONE so it is less critical.

    On the EEE, a touch screen might be a fun toy, but you'd be totally
    lost without a keyboard. The people who actually use them --
    journalists, remote IT staff, mobile professionals -- need to be able
    to type quickly. And the last thing you want to lug around is a USB
    keyboard.
    Hamish Campbell, Jun 12, 2008
    #2
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  3. In article <4850b582$>, vitw did write:

    > On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 12:54:51 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> 1) The human finger is a lot fatter than most of the things you're
    >> trying to point to, particularly on a small screen.

    >
    > Hence the stylus.


    Stylus??

    >> 2) Human skin emits
    >> sweat and oils which create a grime buildup. Touchscreens get dirty
    >> quickly.

    >
    > Careful wiping with a soft cloth and window-cleaning fluid works wonders.


    Except when you have to do it every few minutes.

    >> These are not fixable, because they are not technological problems--not
    >> until someone comes up with a way to redesign the human body.

    >
    > Fixed.


    Back atcha.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 12, 2008
    #3
  4. In article <4850b770$>, vitw did write:

    > One scenario where it's great to have both keyboard and touch-screens is
    > meetings and lectures where there is a need to quickly take lots of notes
    > in both text and diagrams - for example, a fast-moving organic chemistry
    > lecture.


    I don't see why you need a touchscreen for that. Just type in the text, and
    capture the diagrams either beamed wirelessly from a lectern access point,
    or failing such a basic provision, use a built-in webcam.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 12, 2008
    #4
  5. In article <4850ee0d$>, vitw did write:

    > On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 18:48:23 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In article <4850b582$>, vitw did write:
    >>
    >>> On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 12:54:51 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 2) Human skin emits sweat and oils which create a grime buildup.
    >>>> Touchscreens get dirty quickly.
    >>>
    >>> Careful wiping with a soft cloth and window-cleaning fluid works
    >>> wonders.

    >>
    >> Except when you have to do it every few minutes.

    >
    > Don't you ever wash your hands?


    You'd have to do it every few minutes.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 12, 2008
    #5
  6. On Jun 12, 5:43 pm, vitw <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 20:12:25 -0700, Hamish Campbell wrote:
    > > On the EEE, a touch screen might be a fun toy, but you'd be totally lost
    > > without a keyboard. The people who actually use them -- journalists,
    > > remote IT staff, mobile professionals -- need to be able to type
    > > quickly. And the last thing you want to lug around is a USB keyboard.

    >
    > Well maybe the ideal compromise is to use the technology of those higher-
    > end tablet notebooks, where the screen can swivel and close face-up on
    > top of the keyboard.
    >
    > One scenario where it's great to have both keyboard and touch-screens is
    > meetings and lectures where there is a need to quickly take lots of notes
    > in both text and diagrams - for example, a fast-moving organic chemistry
    > lecture.


    I've used a couple of swivel screen tablets and they are very good -
    really are the best of both worlds but they're also bloody expensive
    and I'd hate to see how they held up over time. It's a bit like flip-
    phones... they're cool but they break so easily.

    W/regards the greasy screen issues - the material the screen is made
    of makes a huge difference. I work with retail point of sale systems
    which tend to have plastic screen touch panels and they get grubby
    pretty quickly, but I have a touch screen ITC phone (Jas Jam) with a
    nice glass screen that I've never had to clean. You pay for the
    quality, and EEE is a low end system (to say the least).
    Hamish Campbell, Jun 13, 2008
    #6
  7. In article
    <>, Hamish
    Campbell did write:

    > On Jun 12, 12:54 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    > central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >
    >> 1) The human finger is a lot fatter than most of the things you're trying
    >> to point to, particularly on a small screen.
    >> 2) Human skin emits sweat and oils which create a grime buildup.
    >> Touchscreens get dirty quickly.
    >>
    >> These are not fixable, because they are not technological problems--not
    >> until someone comes up with a way to redesign the human body.

    >
    > There is one light on the horizon: Multi-touch screens.


    Touching with multiple fingers at once will simply exacerbate both the above
    problems.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 13, 2008
    #7
  8. In article
    <>, Hamish
    Campbell did write:

    > W/regards the greasy screen issues - the material the screen is made
    > of makes a huge difference. I work with retail point of sale systems
    > which tend to have plastic screen touch panels and they get grubby
    > pretty quickly, but I have a touch screen ITC phone (Jas Jam) with a
    > nice glass screen that I've never had to clean.


    Where does the grime go, then? All you have to do is touch a glass window
    and look closely where you've touched, to see that glass does indeed hold
    the grime.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 13, 2008
    #8
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