Re: any way to get power to a computer with broken connector

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Baron, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. Baron

    Baron Guest

    bpuharic Inscribed thus:

    > i appreciate the answers about the broken power connector on my
    > computer, so let me ask a different question
    >
    > is there a way to get 110V power to a computer if the connector is
    > broken? ideas? thanks everyone


    The voltage on that connector is only 20v not 110 !

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
    Baron, Nov 20, 2011
    #1
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  2. Baron

    Baron Guest

    bpuharic Inscribed thus:

    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:59:28 +0000, Baron <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>bpuharic Inscribed thus:
    >>
    >>> i appreciate the answers about the broken power connector on my
    >>> computer, so let me ask a different question
    >>>
    >>> is there a way to get 110V power to a computer if the connector is
    >>> broken? ideas? thanks everyone

    >>
    >>The voltage on that connector is only 20v not 110 !

    >
    > that's true, but i still have to get an AC source to my computer


    But its only AC into the power brick ! Thats 20v DC coming out of it at
    around 3.5 amps.

    I did a repair for a client last month where the power socket had been
    broken off the mainboard. No hope of fitting a socket at all,
    fortunately there was enough of the broken board left to be able to cut
    off the plug and solder the power wires directly to the board.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
    Baron, Nov 20, 2011
    #2
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  3. "bpuharic" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:59:28 +0000, Baron <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>bpuharic Inscribed thus:
    >>
    >>> i appreciate the answers about the broken power connector on my
    >>> computer, so let me ask a different question
    >>>
    >>> is there a way to get 110V power to a computer if the connector is
    >>> broken? ideas? thanks everyone

    >>
    >>The voltage on that connector is only 20v not 110 !

    >
    > that's true, but i still have to get an AC source to my computer



    What you have to get to the computer is the OUTPUT OF THE POWER SUPPLY, not
    the wall voltage. If the computer plugs straight into the wall, then you
    need to get 120 to it, otherwise you need to get the output of the power
    supply to the computer.

    The only way I found to do this requires the laptop to be taken apart too
    far to be useable. You could try splicing a jumper cable in, then putting
    the computer back together and see if it will power-up.

    Alternatively, you can remove the hard drive and connect it to a device that
    turns it into a USB device, and then connect it to another machine so you
    can pull files off. There are several USB converters on the market, mine is
    called EZ Connect. I found it at Frys, but I've seen a competitor product at
    BestBuy. The device will have a power supply and a converter thingy. You
    simply connect the cables as needed -- the converter thingy will accept
    3.5-inch and 2.5-inch IDE drives, as well as SATA drives, and makes the
    interface into USB that you simply connect to any machine with USB slots.
    The drive from the laptop will appear on the recipient machine as any other
    USB storage device, and you can then drag and drop files where you want
    them. The converter thingy will cost in the range of about 20 bucks, a
    little more at the store, a little less on eBay. With shipping costs and
    time wasted, I'd suggest going to the store.
    Jeff Strickland, Nov 20, 2011
    #3
  4. "bpuharic" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 10:35:35 -0800, "Jeff Strickland"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"b
    >>The only way I found to do this requires the laptop to be taken apart too
    >>far to be useable. You could try splicing a jumper cable in, then putting
    >>the computer back together and see if it will power-up.
    >>
    >>Alternatively, you can remove the hard drive and connect it to a device
    >>that
    >>turns it into a USB device, and then connect it to another machine so you
    >>can pull files off. There are several USB converters on the market, mine
    >>is
    >>called EZ Connect. I found it at Frys, but I've seen a competitor product
    >>at
    >>BestBuy. The device will have a power supply and a converter thingy. You
    >>simply connect the cables as needed -- the converter thingy will accept
    >>3.5-inch and 2.5-inch IDE drives, as well as SATA drives, and makes the
    >>interface into USB that you simply connect to any machine with USB slots.
    >>The drive from the laptop will appear on the recipient machine as any
    >>other
    >>USB storage device, and you can then drag and drop files where you want
    >>them. The converter thingy will cost in the range of about 20 bucks, a
    >>little more at the store, a little less on eBay. With shipping costs and
    >>time wasted, I'd suggest going to the store.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > how'd you get the computer to ignore the OS on the slave drive when
    > you connected it to the USB port?


    You don't care about the OS because the computer you plug your hard drive
    into is already booted. I do not think -- although I don't remember
    trying -- that the boot sector will be read. It is absolutely true that the
    boot sector will not be read by the machine that is hosting the hard drive
    from the dead laptop because the hosting machine will already be running off
    of the boot sector in its own hard drive.

    Basically, you have a dead laptop and a working second machine. The HDD from
    the dead laptop is connected as a USB Storage Device via the converter
    thingy I explained earlier to the working second machine that is already
    powered up and ready to go.

    I suppose if you connected your HDD from the dead laptop to the second
    machine that is turned off, AND the working machine was set to scan for
    bootable USB Drives before its own hard drive, then the HDD from your laptop
    might drive the show. I'm not sure why you would do this, but I suppose you
    could. My suggestion was to use the old HDD as a USB device for the sole
    purpose of taking files off that you cannot get to via the dead laptop.
    Jeff Strickland, Nov 20, 2011
    #4
  5. "bpuharic" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 18:12:56 +0000, Baron <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>bpuharic Inscribed thus:
    >>
    >>> On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:59:28 +0000, Baron <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>bpuharic Inscribed thus:
    >>>>
    >>>>> i appreciate the answers about the broken power connector on my
    >>>>> computer, so let me ask a different question
    >>>>>
    >>>>> is there a way to get 110V power to a computer if the connector is
    >>>>> broken? ideas? thanks everyone
    >>>>
    >>>>The voltage on that connector is only 20v not 110 !
    >>>
    >>> that's true, but i still have to get an AC source to my computer

    >>
    >>But its only AC into the power brick ! Thats 20v DC coming out of it at
    >>around 3.5 amps.
    >>
    >>I did a repair for a client last month where the power socket had been
    >>broken off the mainboard. No hope of fitting a socket at all,
    >>fortunately there was enough of the broken board left to be able to cut
    >>off the plug and solder the power wires directly to the board.

    >
    > THAT'S what i thought of doing...the board is in good shape. would it
    > be possible to expose the traces on the board and solder wires
    > directly to the board??
    >
    > local computer shop doesn't know how to use a soldering gun, I
    > think...


    You can try it. Basically, the board is toast so you can't possibly make it
    any worse than it already is. It is a multi-layer board (I have no way to
    know what your board is, but my laptop motherboard was either 5 or 7
    layers), and soldering with a gun is iffy on a good day.

    You are gonna make a pile of junk golden, or something for the recycle bin.
    Since it is already on its way to the recycle bin, there's nothing lost in
    trying to solder it back together.
    Jeff Strickland, Nov 20, 2011
    #5
  6. Baron

    Paul Guest

    Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >

    <<snip>>

    > It is a multi-layer board (I have no way to know what your board is,
    > but my laptop motherboard was either 5 or 7 layers), and soldering
    > with a gun is iffy on a good day.


    Multi-layer boards tend to have an even number of layers, like
    four or six would be common for computer motherboards. Desktop
    motherboards tend to be fixed at 0.0625" thick, which places
    an upper limit on the layer count. 5 or 7 layers would be unusual.
    Having an even number of layers, and "stack symmetry", helps
    prevent warpage. Warped boards are undesirable, because they're
    hard to bolt to the chassis, and bending them back, breaks the
    BGA solder joints.

    For soldering work, the "gun" type sucks. These have a relatively
    low duty cycle, so you can't keep the trigger squeezed forever. I
    owned one when I was young, and despite knowing about the
    duty cycle, still burned it out. Not recommended.

    http://www.girr.org/girr/tips/tips6/tool_tips/soldering_gun.jpg

    Cheap irons, have uncontrolled tip temperature. Fortunately,
    even the cheap ones have grounded tips, so there is not
    as much danger from ESD on these, as there used to be. The
    ones offered at Radio Shack, include ones which are actually
    too low power to be practical. (You can't do much with a 15W
    iron.) I use cheap irons like this, and have an 80W one in my
    collection, for stubborn soldering jobs. A 35W one might be
    good for your average job.

    http://rsk.imageg.net/graphics/product_images/pRS1C-5372505w345.jpg

    A proper soldering iron, has controlled tip temperature, and the
    design of the element in the iron, switches off the element when
    the tip gets up to temperature. This is an example of the workhorse
    of the industry. ("You're not living" if you don't have that
    crusty yellow sponge. You wet that with a bottle of water you
    keep next to the station, and use the web sponge to clean the
    soldering iron tip. The water keeps the sponge from burning.)
    This iron also has a grounded tip. Every bench in our hardware lab,
    would have one similar to this. The fancy stations have a LED readout,
    with the temperature setpoint displayed with seven segment LEDs.
    And some models, even had auto-idle detection, and would reduce
    the tip temperature if you didn't use them for a while (very handy).
    Auto-idle detection, helps keep the tip shiny, so it solders better
    when you actually need it.

    http://www.girr.org/girr/tips/tips6/tool_tips/soldering_station.jpg

    With regard to the best repair strategy, disassembly and examination
    are the best first steps. You don't know how bad it is, until
    you've had a look. If the unit is broken, you're not losing
    much by taking it apart for a look. Methodical disassembly, to
    keep all the screws sorted, is a must. The FR4 PCB is pretty
    strong, and the body of the connector might crack, before the
    fiberglass does. It really depends on how close the mounting
    holes are, to the edge of the PCB.

    If it needed mechanical work, you could always try some
    epoxy in the affected area, as a last resort. At my hardware
    store, I can no longer find the epoxy that comes in the
    toothpaste style tubes. Just the accursed "dual syringe"
    packaging, which I hate! So hard to get the product out!

    Paul
    Paul, Nov 20, 2011
    #6
  7. Baron

    Baron Guest

    bpuharic Inscribed thus:

    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 17:43:25 -0500, Paul <> wrote:
    >
    >>Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>>

    >><<snip>>
    >>
    >>> It is a multi-layer board (I have no way to know what your board is,
    >>> but my laptop motherboard was either 5 or 7 layers), and soldering
    >>> with a gun is iffy on a good day.

    >>
    >>Multi-layer boards tend to have an even number of layers, like
    >>four or six would be common for computer motherboards. Desktop
    >>motherboards tend to be fixed at 0.0625" thick, which places
    >>an upper limit on the layer count. 5 or 7 layers would be unusual.
    >>Having an even number of layers, and "stack symmetry", helps
    >>prevent warpage. Warped boards are undesirable, because they're
    >>hard to bolt to the chassis, and bending them back, breaks the
    >>BGA solder joints.

    >
    > excellent paul! thanks much. i have an 80W iron but may borrow a
    > controlled one from work


    Sorry for the late reply, been away for the day.

    In every case I have seen, there has been an exposed ground connection !
    The power connector is always secured by soldering. So that will always
    be the ground. Sometimes the positive connection is accessible just
    behind the centre pin. If you are very lucky the power socket will be
    on a daughter board and easy to get at and repair.

    Disclaimer: Whilst I have worked on a few Gateway machines, I don't
    recall them all.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
    Baron, Nov 22, 2011
    #7
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