Re: Alien Society and the Abduction Phenomenon

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Shadow, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Shadow

    Shadow Guest

    "Sir Arthur C. B. E. Wholeflaffers A.S.A." <> wrote in
    message news:YB24b.18037$...
    > Alien Society and the Abduction Phenomenon by David M. Jacobs
    >
    > Speculating about the inner workings of alien society has always been the
    > special preserve of philosophers, science-fiction authors, and

    scriptwriters for
    > motion pictures and television dramas. Their fanciful depictions are

    usually
    > imaginative projections derived from their personal upbringings, their

    creative
    > powers, and the societies and technological cultures in which they have

    lived.
    >
    > These representations have been fascinating, frightening, and

    entertaining. For
    > the audiences, their plots' fictional genesis has never been in question.

    The
    > discourse between the audience and the inventor has been an agreed upon

    fiction
    > in which aliens are portrayed according to cultural norms of the times.

    Aliens
    > are benevolent and have come to help humans, aliens are malevolent and

    have come
    > to take over and/or destroy human society, aliens have come to share in

    human
    > society because of their own planetary problems, or aliens are angry at
    > spacefaring humans whom they wish to destroy to protect themselves. These

    ideas
    > have permeated entertainment in the 20th century from the early pulp
    > science-fiction magazines like Amazing Stories and Galaxy, to the first
    > alien-themed movies of the early 1950s and to similar science-fiction

    television
    > shows of the 1950s and 1960s.
    >
    > Now, for the first time, another way of constructing an alien society has
    > developed—one that may be fascinating, frightening, and even, on some

    level,
    > entertaining, but not necessarily fictional. I am, of course, referring to
    > abductee descriptions of aliens and their interactions aboard UFOs. It is

    from
    > these descriptions that a picture of alien society can be drawn that

    portrays a
    > very different society than one based on culturally derived fictional
    > representations.
    >
    > The new authors of these alien accounts are not, for the most part,

    professional
    > writers, producers, directors, actors, or others in the entertainment and
    > literary industry. The vast majority of them are not prompted to fashion

    their
    > stories in the hopes of celebrity or remuneration. Often they are

    reluctant
    > storytellers who would sometimes prefer not to tell their accounts rather

    than
    > either to confront these stories consciously with their potential

    psychological
    > ramifications for the narrator, or to have to suffer the ridicule that

    might
    > result for themselves and their families if the stories were to become
    > publicized. Indeed, many say they have had experiences that they remember

    but
    > have no desire to relate them to anyone.
    >
    > In spite of this, thousands of individuals have come forward to tell their
    > private stories—although one suspects that the vast majority have not done

    so
    > even though they might want to because they have found no sympathetic and
    > competent listeners. For the ones who have come forward, their narratives
    > comprise an extraordinary body of evidence revealing a generally

    consistent
    > account of alien life that is on the one hand science-fiction like and on

    the
    > other hand original and ingenuous. The distinctiveness of these fantastic
    > stories coupled with nonfiction makes them striking in their

    verisimilitude.
    >
    > Of course, the evidence for their reality is largely anecdotal and often
    > incomplete, and each account often presents more questions than it

    answers, as
    > is to be expected with new and still emerging data that have not yet been

    fully
    > analyzed. Using these accounts to generalize about the kind of society in

    which
    > extraterrestrials might dwell is obviously intellectually risky because

    the
    > information is so controversial. We are in the position of formulating
    > hypotheses mainly on accounts derived from memory, often filtered through
    > hypnosis usually administered by amateurs. It is difficult to imagine a

    weaker
    > form of evidence.
    >
    > Furthermore, abductees, from whose memory our knowledge of alien society

    comes,
    > will sometimes confabulate and relate events during their abductions that

    either
    > did not happen or happened in very different ways from the ones they

    remember.
    > Thus, using this information to construct an alien society is a difficult

    and
    > perhaps even pointless pursuit and presents the danger of being a unique

    form of
    > collective science fiction—perhaps a bizarre offshoot of the much-reviled
    > collective-unconscious theory.
    >
    > In spite of these problems, the consistency of detail and of narrative

    line, and
    > the extraordinary circumstances in which these abductee stories are

    fashioned
    > add a sense of authenticity to them that cannot be matched by fiction

    authors.
    > With this information generalizations can be made, although partial, that

    might
    > give us a clearer view into the extraordinary world of alien society.
    >
    > According to my analysis of abductee testimony, the structure of alien

    society,
    > like any human society, is complex. Abductees describe a highly evolved

    and
    > advanced I technological society that gives the appearance of a smooth

    running,
    > hierarchical, technocratically ordered culture. The beings are obviously

    very
    > advanced technologically. This requires a mental capacity (either from
    > biological manufacture or from evolution) commensurate with the ability to
    > advance science and thus, in some respects, similar to that of humans.

    Although
    > their mental ability is on a par or even higher than humans, abductees

    give no
    > evidence to suggest that aliens' physiological mechanisms and the

    processes
    > within their anatomical and genetic make-up are the same as humans.
    >
    > Abductees have indicated that alien gross morphology is humanlike but

    their
    > appearance is nonetheless different. Several varieties of aliens appear to

    be
    > involved in the abduction phenomenon. The most common ones are the . gray

    aliens
    > who seemingly do the bulk of the abduction work. They come in two

    varieties:
    > small and taller. Abductees also report seeing reptilian beings, insect

    beings,
    > and human beings. Little is known about the reptilian-like beings, and I

    have
    > found their reporting to be less common than the other types. Human-like

    beings
    > are almost certainly adult hybrids, of which more will be said later.

    Abductees
    > indicate that the insect-like beings are taller than the other aliens and

    at the
    > top of a hierarchical structure of authority; they give orders, while all

    others
    > take them. For the purposes of this article, all aliens, except hybrids,

    will be
    > considered as one group.
    >
    > In spite of their anatomical and hierarchical differences, the beings all

    have
    > certain common and important ~ characteristics: They are all seen together

    on
    > board the same UFOs, they all do more or less the same procedures, and

    most
    > importantly, they all appear to be working together for the same goal.

    Thus, one
    > can surmise that they all come from the same society. But they have

    another
    > aspect in common that might help to define the society in which they

    dwell: They
    > all can communicate telepathically with each other and with abductees.
    >
    > TELEPATHIC COMMUNICATION
    >
    > Telepathic communication has been a more or less constant feature of the
    > abduction phenomenon since the earliest investigations.
    >
    > Like all consistent aspects of the abduction phenomenon, this is

    remarkable. One
    > would expect that in a phenomenon derived from the human psyche, a wide

    variety
    > of communication styles would be reported, which most certainly would

    involve
    > verbal-aural communication emanating from the aliens' mouths, being heard
    > through the abductees' ears, and vice versa. Sign language might be a

    common
    > feature of communication that deluded abductees would seize upon. However,

    these
    > more commonsensical reports are quite rare. In fact, the constancy of

    reported
    > telepathy for over 35 years from all over the world strongly suggests that

    it is
    > the normal mode of communication for all aliens and humans during

    abduction
    > events.
    >
    > Abductees inadvertently bolster the idea that telepathy is the main
    > communication mode by providing indirect evidence that alien physiology is
    > consistent with mental, rather than spoken, communication. Their

    descriptions
    > indicate that insect aliens have no noticeable mouths or noses, making the
    > aspiration of air difficult if not impossible. The more commonly reported

    small
    > and tall gray aliens appear to have mouth-like structures with no tongues

    or
    > teeth. Aliens do not use these structures for sound formation, and the

    mouths
    > are almost always closed. There is little evidence that their jaws open

    and
    > close (or, indeed, that they have jaws). Although some abductees report

    that
    > their mouths are open in a fashion, these accounts are rare, and because

    of the
    > confabulation problem, one must be wary of them. Facial musculature, which

    would
    > allow for ~ expressiveness, is not reported.
    >
    > Finally, abductees do not report anything resembling a respiratory system,

    nor
    > do they describe any apparent larynx, esophagus, lung capacity, or

    aspiration
    > essential for sound formation for either the gray aliens or the insect

    beings.
    > On the receiving end of communication, the insect aliens do not have ears

    or any
    > apparent apparatuses for collecting sound waves. Abductees often see a

    tiny hole
    > where the ears should be on the gray aliens. If these are used for

    receiving
    > sound, they do not, at least on the surface, appear to be very

    sophisticated
    > organs.
    >
    > As can be expected, sounds emanating from the aliens are not reliably

    reported
    > in abduction reports. Without ears, one cannot know the extent to which

    the
    > aliens are capable of hearing. That they do hear something is possible

    because
    > they apparently discern the direction of communication. For example, when

    an
    > abductee physically creates a disturbance on board a UFO, it attracts the
    > aliens' attention even when they were not originally looking at the

    abductee,
    > although it still is difficult to tell whether the ruckus mentally

    attracts
    > their attention or whether the physical commotion causes their notice.

    Also,
    > when an abductee speaks, the aliens will frequently turn and face the one

    who is
    > communicating. All of this, of course, might well be consistent with

    telepathy,
    > and whether the aliens have any sense of hearing is still unknown.
    >
    > Although telepathy is the main method of communication, abductees indicate

    that
    > the aliens have a written culture as well. For example, on board a UFO

    abductees
    > will sometimes see what appears to be reading material—books, papers, and

    other
    > graphical representations of language.
    >
    > They occasionally describe symbols on the walls and on various equipment

    or
    > machines. In some abductions, people have reported being required to

    memorize a
    > set of symbols, which they assume to be an alphabet or pictographs. Thus,
    > although we cannot at this time know all that occurs within alien society,

    it is
    > difficult to imagine a technologically advanced society without a written

    form
    > of communication, and, at least for the purposes of their abduction

    activity, it
    > seems probable that aliens use primarily both a nonspoken and graphical

    symbolic
    > language for their communication.
    >
    > The reporting of the aliens' unique communication qualities is so

    pervasive and
    > consistent that any in-depth study of alien culture must assume that

    telepathy
    > is one of the most influential features. A culture's communication style
    > profoundly influences the type of society in which its inhabitants live.

    For
    > example, tribal societies without written language rely heavily on memory,

    oral
    > tradition, storytelling, and demonstration to pass knowledge through the
    > generations. As a consequence, historical memory plays a much more

    important
    > role in cultural transmission than it does in literate societies. Social
    > relations are often organized around those special people who are

    entrusted to
    > keep the memory of the past. This may not be the case with alien culture,

    but an
    > examination of the effects of telepathy and its consequences might yield,

    along
    > with other known factors about their behavior, some insight into the kind

    of
    > society in which they live.
    >
    > ACTIVATING TELEPATHIC COMMUNICATION
    >
    > Researchers do not know how telepathic communication is activated between

    humans
    > and aliens. At least three scenarios are possible.
    >
    > The first suggests that each human has an innate physiological ability to
    > communicate telepathically with other humans, and the aliens in some way

    tap
    > into that normally unused facility. In fact, it is not uncommon for

    ordinary
    > people to claim that they can read people's minds. Researchers engaged in
    > testing whether extrasensory perception is genuine have long debated the
    > existence of these abilities. So far the evidence, while suggestive, is
    > inconclusive, and these claims have not been consistently validated. If

    this
    > ability is authentic and all humans share it even slightly, it would have

    become
    > a central feature of human thought, culture, and life. The profound effect

    it
    > would have had on almost all human relations would most certainly have

    made
    > human history radically different from what it has been. In fact, little
    > evidence exists that every human has a biological ability to communicate
    > telepathically. And the majority of humans do not claim to have innate
    > telepathic powers. Therefore, telepathic communication is not and has not

    been a
    > valid and recognized form of human communication.
    >
    > If telepathy is not physiologically innate, a second scenario may apply:
    > Abductee telepathy is artificially stimulated by neurological

    manipulations
    > and/or alterations. Thus, aliens provide humans with telepathic abilities

    by
    > biologically affecting permanent changes in brain chemistry. If this were

    the
    > case, one would expect that this telepathic ability would continue after
    > abduction events. In fact, some abductees do claim this happens. They say

    that
    > after some abductions they have a gradually decreasing ability to read

    people's
    > minds for as long as two weeks afterward.
    >
    > Unfortunately, virtually no scientific studies have been mounted to

    substantiate
    > this, and the abductees have not checked with those people who are the

    object of
    > their mind reading to ascertain their accuracy. But even if this were

    true, one
    > would expect that telepathic abilities would last over the course of an
    > abductee's lifetime and not exist only sporadically.
    >
    > It is, of course, possible that the biological changes causing telepathic
    > capacity respond to stimuli only originating with alien causative factors.

    This
    > would mean that telepathy could be activated for an abduction event and

    then
    > deactivated after. If the deactivation is in some way incomplete, and a

    residue
    > of it lingers and wanes, abductees might gain a sense of telepathic
    > communication with other humans in everyday life. This could explain the
    > abductee reports of post-abduction teIepathic abdities.
    >
    > The third possibility for telepathic response is that it is caused by
    > manufactured devices implanted into abductee brains. The implantation of

    such a
    > device might take place during infancy or early childhood. It could be

    activated
    > and deactivated automatically during an abduction. Sometimes these devices

    might
    > be faulty in some way and, like the faulty deactivation of biological

    changes,
    > cause the telepathic response to continue for a period after the

    abduction.
    > However, researchers have yet to discover any such implant in a

    characteristic
    > region of the brain, recover it, and then demonstrate its function.
    >
    > Whatever the causative factor, a form of telepathic communication starts

    at the
    > very beginning of virtually every abduction event. While it is not

    necessarily
    > converted into words, the abductees know what is conveyed to them. Aliens

    can
    > initiate this type of telepathic communication even before the abductees

    see
    > them. For example, abductees "know" that they must go to bed, get out of

    bed, go
    > downstairs, go outside, drive somewhere, stop the car, or do whatever

    activities
    > the nonverbal orders have them do so that the abduction can begin.
    >
    > It is important to understand that all reports of personally directed

    telepathic
    > communication between abductees and aliens from a great distance that are

    not
    > involved with abduction activity are usually examples of channeling. The
    > evidence strongly suggests that aliens are not in communication with

    abductees
    > apart from abductions. Thus, accounts of people having personalized

    dialogues in
    > their normal environments with aliens on a continuing basis are to be

    taken with
    > extreme caution. In the same sense, "messages" to abductees should also be
    > viewed with extreme skepticism.
    >
    > TELEPATHIC DEACTIVATION
    >
    > Telepathic communication is deactivated just as mysteriously as it begins.
    > Abductees do not report procedures whereby the aliens cause telepathic
    > communication to cease. If this were the case, researchers would be seeing

    it at
    > the end of every abduction event. Thus, the closest we can come to

    understanding
    > the origin of the implementation of telepathic communication in the

    abductee is
    > that it is the result of some sort of neurological engagement, artificial

    or
    > biological, with the aliens. It starts with the alteration of

    consciousness and
    > perception that engages neurologically at the beginning of all abduction

    events
    > and usually ends when the abduction is completed.
    >
    > ALIEN-TO-HUMAN COMMUNICATION
    >
    > When one asks abductees what they mean by "telepathic communication," they
    > generally say that they receive an impression in their mind, which

    automatically
    > converts into words for comprehension. Reports from people of different
    > nationalities indicate that the abductees convert telepathic communication

    into
    > whatever language they speak.
    >
    > Thus, and this is important in understanding the global nature of the
    > phenomenon, the aliens circumvent the problem of having to communicate in

    the
    > vast variety of human languages. When in rare instances an abductee

    reports that
    > the telepathic communication he or she is receiving contains an "accent,"

    one
    > can surmise that this has more to do with the abductee's expectations than

    with
    > the reality of the situation (this observation my not apply to hybrid
    > communication).
    >
    > One of the great problems encountered by abduction researchers is the way

    in
    > which abductees recount alien telepathic communication. Not only can it be

    very
    > difficult for abductees to remember exactly what has been "said," but
    > remembrance is also complicated immeasurably by the problem of the

    abductee
    > deciding exactly where the communication originated. Many abductees

    routinely
    > mistake their own thoughts for thoughts put in their mind by the aliens.
    >
    > The question is, how does one distinguish between hearing impressions from

    the
    > aliens, or hearing one's own thoughts? This problem, akin to channeling,

    has
    > provided the rocks upon which many inexperienced abduction researchers

    have
    > foundered. Mistaking human thought for alien communication, researchers

    have
    > often developed poor and misleading data. Because of the human origination

    of
    > this communication, channeled messages of societal concern and benevolence

    often
    > make their way to the public and cause confusion among abductees and

    researchers
    > alike.
    >
    > Most of the time, abductees have no difficulty identifying and

    understanding
    > alien communication, although they often have problems describing

    accurately
    > that conversation for the researcher. Because of trouble converting the
    > communication back to spoken or written language when remembering it, they
    > generally add the phases, "or . something like that" and, "or words to

    that
    > effect," to indicate that they cannot translate the telepathic dialogue

    with
    > total accuracy. Therefore, some imprecision, at least in recall, might be

    a
    > somewhat constant feature of alien-to-human communication.
    >
    > Although the aliens are generally not forthcoming about their goals and
    > purposes, in some instances conversations take place with abductees in

    which the
    > aliens are more substantive and focus on those issues. These conversations

    are
    > infrequent, but when they occur, they can be significant, giving insight

    into
    > the abduction program as a whole. However, the majority of the aliens'
    > conversations with abductees are either directive or palliative. They tell

    the
    > abductee to remove his clothes, to get up on a table, to follow them, to

    get
    > dressed, that it is time to go, and so forth. They tell the abductee that

    he
    > will not be hurt, or that he will not be there long, that everything is

    going to
    > be all right, to calm down, and so forth.
    >
    > HUMAN-TO-ALIEN COMMUNICATION
    >
    > Humans communicate with aliens in much the same way as the aliens

    communicate
    > with them. Abductees report that they were unable to fashion words with

    their
    > mouths. They indicate that they were paralyzed and could not speak even if

    they
    > wanted to. Just as often they say that it does not even occur to them to

    use
    > their voices.
    >
    > But in order to engage aliens in conversation, they know that it must be
    > accomplished from mind to mind. Usually, humans report communication with

    aliens
    > that relate to their situation on board the object: the purpose of

    procedures
    > administered to them, how long they will be there, and if others abducted

    with
    > them are all right. They might even ask general questions about the

    purposes and
    > meaning of the abduction program, although this is not usual.
    >
    > Asking questions, however, does not mean that the aliens will answer; the
    > question does not necessarily provide psychological pressure for an alien

    to
    > answer. If they i answer at all, it is often with vague generalities.

    Thus,
    > responding to a question does not necessarily mean that valuable

    information
    > will be imparted, although it sometimes does occur.
    >
    > Although virtually all communication is telepathic, abductees report that

    at
    > times they find that they can verbalize. Usually this comes out in the

    form of
    > shouts, cries, moans, and other vocalizations. It is sometimes a shock for

    an
    > abductee to hear the silence pierced by the screams of another abductee on

    board
    > a UFO. Therefore, vocalization is possible at times, but word formation is

    not.
    >
    > ALIEN-TO-ALIEN COMMUNICATION
    >
    > In order to develop and maintain a scientifically advanced society,
    > alien-to-alien telepathic communication must, by logic and necessity, be
    > precise. The aliens must be able to convey advanced scientific concepts

    and
    > mathematical equations on a sophisticated level. Accuracy, clarity, and
    > flexibility in communication would be essential for their accomplishments.

    Thus,
    > sophisticated "intra-communication" between aliens is critical. And it

    parallels
    > the requisites that human languages possess.
    >
    > Aliens are often seen communicating with each other in private

    conversation, and
    > they are seen in group situations in which all participants are

    communicating.
    > How rich their communication skills are is unknown, but they are able to

    convey
    > all that is needed to create their civilization.
    >
    > The aliens' logical minds suggest that the interactions and thought

    processes
    > with abductees are quite similar to those of humans. We are able to

    understand
    > their commands, their desires, their motivations, and their procedures.

    Most
    > areas of alien life are still mysterious, but the evidence suggests that

    given
    > enough information, everything they do is amenable to human understanding,

    both
    > through direct communication with abductees and by deduction afterward by
    > researchers.
    >
    > HUMAN-TO-HUMAN TELEPATHY
    >
    > Abductees can sometimes carry on conversations with other abductees whom

    they
    > encounter on board a UFO. Human-to-human communication can either be by
    > telepathy or by voice. When talking to another human, the abductees do not
    > consciously chose telepathy or voice. They simply do one or the other. Why
    > humans can communicate aurally with one another is a mystery, given that

    it is
    > apparently very difficult in other abduction contexts. It is possible that

    they
    > only think they are talking normally but they are actually communicating
    > telepathically.
    >
    > When humans converse with one another, their conversations typically often

    focus
    > on how they can escape from the UFO or what the aliens are going to do to

    them.
    > Often one abductee tries to calm or reassure other abductees, saying that

    the
    > aliens will not hurt them and they will be leaving soon.
    >
    > In effect, they do the aliens' work for them. Whether this is because of

    alien
    > design or because it stems from human compassion remains to be seen.

    Although
    > these types of conversation seem reasonable on the surface, in fact they

    are
    > somewhat frustrating for the researcher. Only rarely will the abductees

    exchange
    > their names and addresses.
    >
    > They seem unaware that they will most likely forget the experience

    directly
    > afterwards, and it does not occur to them that it might be important to

    locate
    > the person whom they saw on board for verification of their experience.

    Much of
    > this has to do with the aliens' abilities to neurologically alter the

    mechanisms
    > of memory and consciousness that is beyond the scope of this discussion.
    >
    > INDIRECT HUMAN-ALIEN TELEPATHY
    >
    > Frequently abductees report that they can tap into communication between

    two or
    > more aliens and between other humans and other aliens. Although it is

    difficult
    > for them to be precise about everything the aliens say, they generally
    > comprehend the context of the discussions, which often involve mundane

    exchanges
    > about the best way to go about performing a procedure upon the abductee,

    the
    > nature of the next procedure to perform, or aspects of the abductee's
    > physiology. Sometimes abductees can be quite specific, detailing what each

    alien
    > said. Therefore, aliens and humans in proximity to hear telepathic

    communication
    > can receive at least some of it. It is not known if the aliens can

    privatize
    > their communication by whispering or by in some way preventing others from
    > hearing their thoughts.
    >
    > As yet, I and other researchers have found no evidence to suggest that

    abductees
    > can hear or monitor alien thought processes apart from those specifically
    > employed for communication. They cannot listen in on the private mental

    world of
    > thoughts that the beings might possess. Abductees are unaware of the ideas

    that
    > lurk behind the aliens' conversations directed at them. Thus, the

    abductees
    > probably have only limited abilities to listen to the aliens' thoughts.

    But
    > testimony exists to suggest that the reverse might be true— aliens can
    > understand what abductees are thinking privately.
    >
    > For example, when one abductee was forced to hold a hybrid baby, she

    threatened
    > to throw it to the floor. She said, however, that the aliens knew she did

    not
    > mean it. Similarly, when an abductee is worried about another family

    member
    > abducted with him, the aliens will tell him that the relative will be all

    right,
    > even though the abductee did not directly address the alien about his

    fears.
    > When abductees are becoming frightened just before a procedure is

    administered,
    > the aliens will sense the anxiety and take measures to calm him. Abductees
    > appear not to have these abilities, and therefore the aliens might well

    have
    > stronger powers of telepathic communication than abductees possess.
    >
    > CONSEQUENCES OF ALIEN COMMUNICATION
    >
    > The evidence suggests at least two possible scenarios for the character of

    alien
    > society. The first is based on the idea of total telepathy: All aliens can
    > monitor all other aliens' thoughts. There are no barriers or limitations.

    The
    > second is based on limited telepathy: Aliens can monitor only selected
    > (filtered) thoughts. The second scenario suggests that the aliens have a

    choice
    > about whether or not they desire to have all thoughts open to monitoring.

    The
    > two scenarios reflect societies that might differ in the degree of

    personal
    > privacy allowed, but are nonetheless still extremely dissimilar to human
    > cultures.
    >
    > The totally telepathic society, while having logic and rationality in

    common
    > with human societies, would, by ' necessity, be profoundly different.

    Although
    > an uncontrollable full exposure of all thoughts would be considered

    horrifying
    > in most human societies, it could be the norm for a totally telepathic

    society,
    > and its consequences would be enormous. In effect, one would be forced to

    share
    > one's innermost private life with all others, and therefore individual

    freedom
    > of thought would be diminished or even nonexistent.
    >
    > In this type of society, uniqueness and individuality could be

    significantly
    > curtailed. Special characteristics of physiology, clothes, affect, and
    > expression, which can be important for human expression of individuality,

    would
    > have little, if any, use in a society where individual identity .~. is

    severely
    > diminished or altogether unnecessary. In human .r prisons and other

    institutions
    > an inmate's identity is systematically stripped away so that the

    controlling
    > powers can rebuild the member's identity to control him psychologically

    and to
    > satisfy the needs of the organization. Prisoners are given numbers instead

    of
    > names, they wear uniforms instead of freely chosen clothes, they eat the

    same
    > food, they sleep in the same quarters, and most other areas of choice are
    > severely limited.
    >
    > In an alien society this rebuilding would not be necessary. The

    inhabitants
    > would be born into a public, or even corporate (rather than private)

    culture.
    > The aliens' identity would be reflective primarily of that society's needs

    and
    > of the specific function that they must perform within it. Individuality

    would
    > not be deemed a functional operative within this system.
    >
    > Abductee reports appear to bear out the diminution of individual alien

    identity.
    > The gray aliens seem to have no names or personality characteristics that
    > separate them r from the others. Outwardly, they look alike, dress alike,

    act
    > alike, and, most probably, think alike. They appear to have few activities

    that
    > would give them personal satisfaction— they do not joke with abductees,

    engage
    > in dialogue about themselves, ask personal questions for their own

    satisfaction,
    > and so forth. All personality and individual activity is directed toward

    the
    > abduction goal in a clinical and dispassionate way.
    >
    > Because personal uniqueness, individuality, and one's r sense of self

    would be
    > significantly altered, a hive mentality would ensue as function and

    performance
    > become more important than creativity and initiative. The group rather

    than the
    > individual becomes the most important social unit, as the alien is less a
    > private than a public being. In effect, the government or the hierarchy of
    > authority becomes paramount as the individual is subordinated to group

    needs. In
    > this atmosphere, harboring thoughts opposed to the group's prevailing

    norms and
    > viewpoints might be undesirable and perhaps even unthinkable. The beings

    would
    > have little or no ability to become rebels or to struggle significantly

    against
    > the societal grain. Conformity and rigid truth would be the norm

    regardless of
    > nuance or the little white lies of normal discourse that allow for human

    society
    > to proceed smoothly and humanely without injury to others' feelings. In

    such a
    > society, good or evil do not exist, only function and compliance.
    >
    > The second scenario suggests that alien society might be based on a

    reduced, or
    > partial, telepathy. In this type of telepathic society it is probable that

    the
    > aliens would have r, more control in their ability to be telepathic. It is
    > difficult to imagine a functioning society in which every thought is open

    to
    > everyone else (as noted in the first scenario). For example, the noise of

    other
    > beings' thoughts impeding upon one's mind would be detrimental to accurate
    > communication and possibly imperil survival. Without the critical capacity

    to
    > filter out what is not wanted, one's ability to perform tasks accurately

    and
    > efficiently would be impeded. Therefore, it is probably necessary for the

    beings
    > to have a mechanism to turn aspects of telepathy on or off or at least

    increase
    > or decrease its intensity. It is highly likely that they employ a

    filtering
    > method for clarity of communication, and thus telepathy might very well be
    > limited to purposeful communication.
    >
    > Nevertheless, the ability to tap into another being's thoughts on any

    level
    > would significantly diminish the concept of privacy. Although the aliens

    would
    > have a more private inner life, their sense of self and their ability to

    express
    > individuality would be severely compromised. The salient factor would

    still be
    > the inner, rather than outer, mode of expression and communication, and

    that
    > might well have almost as severe a set of consequences on group versus
    > individual norms as total telepathy would have, and it would still be

    consistent
    > with abductee descriptions of their interactions.
    >
    > Whatever the degree of telepathy, the chances are that it actively

    contributes
    > to a society that is more communal than private, more conforming than
    > individual. It is unknown to what degree the aliens can employ and

    manipulate
    > telepathy, but regardless of the degree of this method of communication,

    it
    > suggests even more profound differences between alien and human society.
    >
    > ALIEN AND HUMAN SOCIETAL DIFFERENCES
    >
    > In human society, much of the quality of life is dependent upon the

    hearing
    > mechanism. In a society based on telepathy, it must not be assumed that

    the
    > aliens have lost their ability to hear through eons of evolution; their
    > communicative abilities might well have evolved and developed as a normal

    part
    > of their genetics (if, indeed, they have genetics). Thus, the nonhearing

    society
    > would not have the benefit of the aesthetic world that comes with hearing.

    All
    > music (and perhaps dance), which enriches and fulfills our lives in

    innumerable
    > ways and which are some of the earliest and most important art forms for

    all
    > human societies, would be nonexistent in a telepathic society. It also

    implies
    > that the aliens might have no genetically determined aesthetic sense

    and/or
    > inner emotions satisfied by rhythmic and melodic notes produced by

    patterned
    > tones and beats.
    >
    > The normal visual cues that both deaf and hearing humans rely upon for

    complete
    > communication are, in telepathic communication, not present. The aliens do

    not
    > use their hands to gesture expressively. The subtle and wide range of

    expression
    > that humans can use—cynicism, irony, sarcasm, drama—seem to be limited for

    the
    > aliens, and the range of communicative expression that comes from subtle

    facial
    > movements is almost nonexistent. Abductees do not report the use of body
    > language to communicate subtleties and nuance, although it is possible

    that
    > aliens may have incorporated this into their telepathic communication

    without
    > abductees being able to recognize it.
    >
    > EMOTIONS, TELEPATHY, AND VISUAL ARTS
    >
    > Abductees report that alien emotional range seems to be greatly

    circumscribed.
    > Possibly, telepathy restricts the range of emotions that can be

    transmitted
    > and/or received. Whatever the reasons, abductee narratives suggest that

    aliens'
    > emotional life falls within narrow parameters. That they do have emotions

    is
    > widely reported. They seem to display satisfaction, excitement, a limited

    form
    > of happiness, and even a limited form of fondness. Conversely, they can

    become
    > frustrated, annoyed, surprised, peeved, and even irritated. Abductees

    sometimes
    > describe aliens as having an extremely rudimentary sense of humor,

    especially
    > when dealing with human children.
    >
    > Although aliens obviously possess emotions, their feelings are not

    variable and
    > expansive enough to encompass what humans rely upon for a normal quality

    of
    > life. In general, abductees do not report instances when they see aliens
    > laughing, crying, becoming enraged, expressing sincere love, unrestrained

    joy,
    > feeling jealousy, or having their feelings hurt. In general, they do not

    display
    > a deep sense of humor, and abductees rarely report that they are laughing.
    > Virtually every emotion seems to exist within a narrow range. It is

    conceivable
    > that these emotions are present but the aliens hold them rigidly in check.
    > However, with the extremely wide range of abduction accounts now

    available, this
    > seems unlikely because abductees almost never report seeing slip-ups in

    which
    > the aliens exhibit wider limits of their emotions. Abductees have reported

    that
    > they can telepathically sense this limited range of emotions even under

    the most
    > trying times when they have physically attacked aliens, refused to

    cooperate
    > with them, actively resisted them by running, flailing, and so on. Under

    these
    > trying circumstances, one would expect a wider assortment of alien

    emotional
    > reactions, but none is forthcoming.
    >
    > If the aliens actually have this restricted emotional sense, it has

    profound
    > implications for the telepathic society in which they live. Aliens

    obviously
    > have the sense of sight, but without the emotional range to gratify the

    senses
    > visually, it is doubtful whether they have developed an art form based on
    > vision. Thus, paintings, drawings, and graphics
    > are conspicuous by their absence within the interior of UFOs. Strong

    color,
    > which causes emotional reactions in humans, is almost nonexistent on the

    walls
    > of UFOs. In fact, abductees report little aesthetic sense whatever in

    their
    > surroundings on board the UFOs. The rooms, equipment, hallways, and most

    apparel
    > are functional, clinical, and devoid of artistic expression. The small

    gray
    > aliens and most of the taller gray aliens dress alike (if they wear

    anything at
    > all), and fashion design does not appear to be important. The exception to

    this
    > is the insect-like beings who sometimes wear robes with high collars (some
    > abductees have reported robes with a simple hem design on them). Abductees

    also
    > report that these beings will sometimes also wear an amulet around their

    neck
    > with a design on it. Whether the design or amulet is for decorative

    purpose or
    > for another, perhaps political, social, or technological purpose is

    unknown.
    >
    > The aliens' lack of a nose and mouth (and with evidence of obtaining

    nutrition
    > by absorption) suggests the absence of the entire range of sensory

    satisfaction
    > in which humans indulge through the preparation and ingestion of food. The

    great
    > cuisine’s of the world and all the lore, mythology, and day-to-day

    enjoyment of
    > eating would not be a factor in the aliens' society. Fragrances by

    themselves
    > would have little or no meaning. For example, freshly mowed grass,

    flowers, and
    > the entire range of earthly and animal scents would be lost on aliens.
    >
    > With a restricted range of emotions—coupled with their lack of ears,

    noses, or
    > mouths—their society would be less colorful than ours. One would expect

    that the
    > range of emotion-based interactions between the aliens would be limited;

    events
    > that generate enjoyment, laughter, awe, thrills, and so forth, would be

    either
    > severely restricted or nonexistent. In this dull world, the texture of

    alien
    > society would be flatter and emptier than that of human society and hence

    far
    > less stimulating.
    >
    > The paucity of aesthetic sense means that the world of human art and

    design with
    > all its branches is unknown to the aliens and perhaps not understood. It

    also
    > means that they probably do not understand the role that aesthetics plays

    in
    > human life. This suggests that a complete understanding of human

    psychology may
    > be beyond their grasp. They might remain forever outsiders, partially

    grasping
    > human motivation, but unable to fully comprehend it. (But they can still

    use
    > human emotion for their own purposes as they have done so effectively in

    their
    > neurologically based staring and visualization procedures.)
    >
    > Thus, the world of art and aesthetics that occupy the lives of so many

    humans is
    > nonexistent in an alien society. It is entirely possible that there are no

    art
    > forms like painting, drawing, photography, literature, drama, and

    performance
    > art. The passionate and complex world of theater, entertainment, sports,

    or any
    > other area depending on the highs and low of human emotions does not exist

    in
    > their world. If this were true, they would live in a dull, joyless society
    > focused on work, obedience, subservience to the
    > group, and obedience to an authoritarian hierarchy.
    >
    > TELEPATHY AND ALIEN EMOTIONAL LIFE
    >
    > In a society based on telepathy and restricted emotional range, it might

    be
    > difficult to experience what we would call ~ love. Without a sense of

    self-love
    > that comes from a sense r of individuality, the aliens might have a

    diminished
    > capacity to have these feelings. They certainly have the ability to elicit
    > feelings of love and affection in abductees through neural stimulation,

    and
    > abductees often make the mistake of assuming that those feelings are

    reciprocal.
    > Although a taller alien being might show a sense of friendship or even

    intimate
    > that he likes someone, there is little evidence that he has any capacity

    to love
    > in the human sense.
    >
    > The aliens' inability to love also suggests that theirr sense of morality

    and
    > conscience might be different. This complements their apparent lack of
    > individual personality, attributes, especially in the smaller beings, and

    the
    > steady pace of cooperation that abductees report. It also allows for their
    > apparent lack of moral qualms when they abduct people. For them, the ends
    > justify the means, and the concept of conscience does not seem to play an
    > important role in their abduction program.
    >
    > Rationality and logic play a far more important role in r their society

    than
    > emotion, empathy, and sympathy. Thus, the human connection that one

    expects in
    > all human societ-, ies would be absent in alien society. When this

    connection is
    > lost and the dominant group identifies the other as the enemy or the

    lesser
    > species, it becomes easier for that group to subjugate or even eliminate

    the
    > subordinate group. The history of genocide in the world amply displays the
    > consequences of the objectification and demonization of the' other. The

    aliens'
    > activity in relation to the abduction and r exploitation of humans could

    well be
    > an indication of this mode of thinking.
    >
    > TELEPATHY AND HYBRIDS
    >
    > One aspect of alien society is especially important and deserves mention.
    > Significantly, hybrids appear to bridge the gap between alien and human

    both in
    > appearance and in communication. While the ones that look more alien

    (early- r
    > stage) communicate telepathically, the ones that look more human

    (late-stage)
    > can communicate both telepathically, and orally. When the late-stage

    hybrids
    > speak through their mouths, they are more communicative and more

    expressive than
    > the aliens. One can speculate that the more human they appear, the more

    they
    > display oral communicative abilities.
    >
    > The hybrids live in the alien-dominated society, and their lives are ruled

    by
    > that dominant culture. When abductees describe disagreements and clashes

    between
    > aliens and r hybrids, the differences between a subordinate society with

    more
    > complete humanlike sensory abilities—hearing, tasting, smelling, and so

    on—and
    > thus a fuller emotional range, and the more restricted nonhearing alien

    society
    > are brought into sharp relief. For example, on one occasion a hybrid was

    engaged
    > in an argument with an alien over using an abductee as a special project.

    The
    > hybrid was anxious, angry, animated, and stubborn. The alien was cool,

    logical,
    > unruffled, and in control.
    >
    > If late-stage hybrid emotions run the gamut from love to hate, they can

    present
    > special difficulties for the aliens. In one abduction event, an alien told

    the
    > abductee they were having difficulty controlling the hybrids because their
    > emotional needs constituted a serious problem that the aliens had not

    fully
    > understood before they embarked upon their reproductive program. If this

    is
    > true, the role of hybrid emotions looms as a significant problem for the

    aliens.
    > What the final results will be of the mixing of these two types of beings

    is
    > unclear.
    >
    > CONCLUSION
    >
    > The aliens (insect and gray) most likely represent a society based on

    different
    > sensate determinants than those of human societies. Their society appears

    to be
    > group- and work- oriented. They live in a colorless society, both

    literally and
    > figuratively. It has fewer diversions and entertainments, and less

    aesthetic
    > content than human society. On board a UFO, it is apparent that the aliens

    lead
    > a life of service and work in which individuality is subordinated to the

    group.
    >
    > Their form of communication plays a significant role in the ordering of

    their
    > lives and culture. Privacy and individual expression are either

    nonexistent or
    > severely truncated. Telepathy both isolates and joins the aliens together

    in
    > ways that are very different than in human societies. The quality of the

    aliens
    > lives and the shape of their society as a whole is significantly formed by

    the
    > role that the interplay between telepathy and a restricted neurology of

    the
    > senses plays. It is a society in which humans would feel quite alien. --

    David
    > M. Jacobs, Ph.D., is associate professor of history at Temple University.

    He is
    > editor of UFOs and Abductions: Challenging the Borders of Knowledge

    (University
    > Press of Kansas, 2000) and author of The UFO Controversy in America

    (1975),
    > Secret Life: Firsthand Accounts of UFO Abductions (1992), and The Threat

    (1998).
    >
    >

    ..
     
    Shadow, Sep 1, 2003
    #1
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  2. Shadow

    Knud Guest

    > They appear to have few activities that would give them personal
    > satisfaction- they do not joke with abductees, engage in dialogue
    > about themselves, ask personal questions for their own satisfaction,
    > and so forth.


    I remember reading something about where a taller being snipped off a
    lock of hair from an abductee, and put it to his (bald) head. This was
    considered "funny" to the smaller beings around him.


    > In fact, abductees report little aesthetic sense whatever
    > in their surroundings on board the UFOs. The rooms, equipment,
    > hallways, and most apparel are functional, clinical, and devoid of
    > artistic expression. The small gray aliens and most of the taller gray
    > aliens dress alike (if they wear anything at all), and fashion design
    > does not appear to be important.


    It may also be possible the "UFO's" were designed specifically for the
    task of processing abductees, like our hospitals or military vehicles
    are.

    > Their society appears to be group- and work- oriented. They live in a
    > colorless society, both literally and figuratively. It has fewer
    > diversions and entertainments, and less aesthetic content than human
    > society. On board a UFO, it is apparent that the aliens lead a life of
    > service and work in which individuality is subordinated to the group.


    If the US military went to another planet and started abducting aliens to
    study, they may say the same thing about us.
     
    Knud, Sep 1, 2003
    #2
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  3. Shadow

    logosdream Guest

    i'd be an awful lot of space.
    we're obviously not the only species on this planet,
    what makes you think it ends there? probably there is and not intelligent,
    as bacterial life form and the such, think outside the box my friend.
    we're not alone, life's right in front of your eyes in all shapes and sizes.

    "Knud" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns93E9587BE369DKnudnowherecom@204.127.36.1...
    > > They appear to have few activities that would give them personal
    > > satisfaction- they do not joke with abductees, engage in dialogue
    > > about themselves, ask personal questions for their own satisfaction,
    > > and so forth.

    >
    > I remember reading something about where a taller being snipped off a
    > lock of hair from an abductee, and put it to his (bald) head. This was
    > considered "funny" to the smaller beings around him.
    >
    >
    > > In fact, abductees report little aesthetic sense whatever
    > > in their surroundings on board the UFOs. The rooms, equipment,
    > > hallways, and most apparel are functional, clinical, and devoid of
    > > artistic expression. The small gray aliens and most of the taller gray
    > > aliens dress alike (if they wear anything at all), and fashion design
    > > does not appear to be important.

    >
    > It may also be possible the "UFO's" were designed specifically for the
    > task of processing abductees, like our hospitals or military vehicles
    > are.
    >
    > > Their society appears to be group- and work- oriented. They live in a
    > > colorless society, both literally and figuratively. It has fewer
    > > diversions and entertainments, and less aesthetic content than human
    > > society. On board a UFO, it is apparent that the aliens lead a life of
    > > service and work in which individuality is subordinated to the group.

    >
    > If the US military went to another planet and started abducting aliens to
    > study, they may say the same thing about us.
    >
    >
    >
     
    logosdream, Sep 1, 2003
    #3
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