Re: Addition of ".home" to the range of sub-domains available in NZ

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Jay, Jul 27, 2003.

  1. Jay

    Jay Guest

    Lennier wrote:

    > What do you think about adding ".home" to the currently available list of
    > sub-domains ".net", ".co", ".org" etc?
    >
    > That way when affordable broadband arrives here in NZ people will be able
    > to get a domain name that would be more suited to domestic use.
    >


    When affordable broadband does eventually arrive in NZ (if ever)
    then your ISP will assign you an IP address which may change from
    time to time. So you wont be able to have a simple static domain anyhow.
    You will get the (email) domain that your ISP assigns you.

    If you want your own domain then you would have to make special
    arrangement with your ISP - in your dreams for home broadband.

    So, you will have your domain hosted somewhere like the USA where
    it is the most affordable. In which case you can chose whatever domain
    you like.

    Does that answer your question?
    Jay, Jul 27, 2003
    #1
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  2. In article <>, wrote:
    >On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 10:19:12 +1000, Jay <> wrote:

    *SNIP*
    >When IPv6 really arives there will be *millions* of IP addresses

    Per person. IPv6 is 2^128 addresses, which is a number so enormous that
    there's not actually a word for it.

    >available. It's unclear (to me anyway) what effects that would have,
    >but I suspect that there will be no need for dynamic IP addresses as
    >we understand them today. The ISPs and telcos will find other ways to
    >monitor and control bandwidth usage.
    >

    The numbers I've seen are along the lines of a /48 for every person
    currently alive - A /48 is 65535*18,446,744,073,709,551,616 (ie: one
    REALLY, REALLY, _REALLY_ enormous number) addresses. Even if it were
    only a /64 per person, which seems must more realistic, there are
    18,446,744,073,709,551,616 addresses in a /64.

    In view of that, there's no need for an ISP to worry about dynamic
    addressing. Static addresses for everyone :)

    --
    Matthew Poole Auckland, New Zealand
    "Veni, vidi, velcro...
    I came, I saw, I stuck around"

    My real e-mail is mattATp00leDOTnet
    Matthew Poole, Jul 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. Jay

    Enkidu Guest

    On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 10:19:12 +1000, Jay <> wrote:

    >Lennier wrote:
    >
    >> What do you think about adding ".home" to the currently available list of
    >> sub-domains ".net", ".co", ".org" etc?
    >>
    >> That way when affordable broadband arrives here in NZ people will be able
    >> to get a domain name that would be more suited to domestic use.
    >>

    >
    >When affordable broadband does eventually arrive in NZ (if ever)
    >then your ISP will assign you an IP address which may change from
    >time to time. So you wont be able to have a simple static domain anyhow.
    >You will get the (email) domain that your ISP assigns you.
    >
    >If you want your own domain then you would have to make special
    >arrangement with your ISP - in your dreams for home broadband.
    >
    >So, you will have your domain hosted somewhere like the USA where
    >it is the most affordable. In which case you can chose whatever domain
    >you like.
    >
    >Does that answer your question?
    >

    Yes, but the answer is wrong.

    You can have your own Domain Name right now. I do, and it's easy,
    especially if you don't want to host the actual website and mail
    yourself. All you need to do is point your DNS entries for your mail
    to your mailbox at the ISP, and the entry for your website at the IP
    address where it is hosted. Your ISP *will* help you with this,
    especially if the DNS is hosted with them. Otherwise places like
    www.registerdirect.co.nz will allow you to maintain your own records
    in their DNS (and they will provide mailboxes too). (I've never used
    RegisterDirect and I have no connection with them).

    So my Domain Name is cliffp.com. It is hosted in NZ. I have my email
    sent to my ISP, Actrix, through @cliffp.com (via a mail redirect where
    I host my DNS). The guys at Actrix sorted that for me. I don't
    currently have a Website but if I did, I could get the DNS (hosted in
    NZ remember) pointed at it. If I hosted it at Actrix, I'm sure the
    guys there would set up their end for me.

    Basically, it doesn't matter where in the world you are situated, you
    can have any legitimate Domain Name that you like. I could have
    cliffp.ru (where they don't have an intermediate level.)

    When IPv6 really arives there will be *millions* of IP addresses
    available. It's unclear (to me anyway) what effects that would have,
    but I suspect that there will be no need for dynamic IP addresses as
    we understand them today. The ISPs and telcos will find other ways to
    monitor and control bandwidth usage.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    Signed and sealed with Great Seal of the Executive
    Council of the Internet, by The Master of The Net.
    Enkidu, Jul 27, 2003
    #3
  4. Jay

    Ewen McNeill Guest

    In article <>,
    Enkidu <> wrote:
    >You can have your own Domain Name right now. I do, and it's easy,
    >especially if you don't want to host the actual website and mail
    >yourself. All you need to do is point your DNS entries for your mail
    >to your mailbox at the ISP, and the entry for your website at the IP
    >address where it is hosted. [....]
    >So my Domain Name is cliffp.com. It is hosted in NZ. I have my email
    >sent to my ISP, Actrix, through @cliffp.com (via a mail redirect where
    >I host my DNS). The guys at Actrix sorted that for me.


    That'd definitely be the way to do it: direct the mail to a mail server,
    such as one at an ISP, which is always available. I know a few people
    with their own domains that do that -- direct the mail at their ISP's
    mail server (after arranging it at the ISP) and it seems to work well.

    Curiously cliffp.com seems to be set up somewhat differently from what
    you describe:

    -=- cut here -=-
    ewen@basilica:~ $ host -t MX cliffp.com
    cliffp.com mail is handled by 40 mail.web.co.nz.
    cliffp.com mail is handled by 10 mail.cliffp.com.
    ewen@basilica:~ $ host mail.cliffp.com
    mail.cliffp.com has address 203.79.66.21
    ewen@basilica:~ $ host 203.79.66.21
    21.66.79.203.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer 203-79-66-21.adsl-wns.paradise.net.nz.
    -=- cut here -=-

    which seems to be directing the mail at an ADSL modem serviced through
    Paradise, and then with a fall back to some businesses mail server if
    the first mail server isn't available.

    The disadvantage of a setup like what seems to be in place for cliffp.com,
    is that when the ADSL connection is down (or the server behind it is
    down/unreachable) there'll be a few attempts to deliver mail to it, before
    it fails over to the backup server. Which results in wasted traffic,
    and failure reports in the logs of whoever is sending the mail.

    If it only happens occassionally it's no big deal. But if the ADSL
    connection is often/usually down and/or the mail server behind it is
    often/usually down, it means that the mail always has to "noisly" fail
    over to the backup mail server.

    Generally pointing the primary MX at a server that is often/usually down
    is discouraged. "Mail bagging" and the like is a more appropriate way
    to get SMTP-on-demand style delivery of mail on the occassions when it
    is up, rather than making every mail server try and fail to deliver
    to the often/usually down server first.

    Not that I've noticed this happening or anything....

    Ewen

    --
    Ewen McNeill,
    Ewen McNeill, Jul 27, 2003
    #4
  5. Jay

    Jay Guest

    Enkidu wrote:

    > On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 10:19:12 +1000, Jay <> wrote:
    >
    >>Lennier wrote:
    >>
    >>> What do you think about adding ".home" to the currently available list
    >>> of sub-domains ".net", ".co", ".org" etc?
    >>>
    >>> That way when affordable broadband arrives here in NZ people will be
    >>> able to get a domain name that would be more suited to domestic use.
    >>>

    >>
    >>When affordable broadband does eventually arrive in NZ (if ever)
    >>then your ISP will assign you an IP address which may change from
    >>time to time. So you wont be able to have a simple static domain anyhow.
    >>You will get the (email) domain that your ISP assigns you.
    >>
    >>If you want your own domain then you would have to make special
    >>arrangement with your ISP - in your dreams for home broadband.
    >>
    >>So, you will have your domain hosted somewhere like the USA where
    >>it is the most affordable. In which case you can chose whatever domain
    >>you like.
    >>
    >>Does that answer your question?
    >>

    > Yes, but the answer is wrong.
    >
    > You can have your own Domain Name right now. I do, and it's easy,
    > especially if you don't want to host the actual website and mail
    > yourself.


    Of course you can. But that wasn't what I was saying.
    The op was obviously wanting to have a .home domain so he
    could run own domain locally. Not pointing to an external hosting site.

    > All you need to do is point your DNS entries for your mail
    > to your mailbox at the ISP, and the entry for your website at the IP
    > address where it is hosted. Your ISP *will* help you with this,
    > especially if the DNS is hosted with them.


    You ISP doesn't need to help with hosting your domain elsewhere.

    > Otherwise places like
    > www.registerdirect.co.nz will allow you to maintain your own records
    > in their DNS (and they will provide mailboxes too). (I've never used
    > RegisterDirect and I have no connection with them).


    And there are dynamic ones too ...
    Jay, Jul 27, 2003
    #5
  6. Jay

    DPF Guest

    On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 07:35:09 GMT, (Matthew Poole)
    wrote:

    >In article <>, wrote:
    >>On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 10:19:12 +1000, Jay <> wrote:

    >*SNIP*
    >>When IPv6 really arives there will be *millions* of IP addresses

    >Per person. IPv6 is 2^128 addresses, which is a number so enormous that
    >there's not actually a word for it.


    On the contrary there is indeed. The number is:

    three hundred and forty undecillion, two hundred and eight two
    decillion, three hundred and sixty six nonillion, nine hundred and
    twenty octillion and nine hundred and thirty eight septillion.

    >The numbers I've seen are along the lines of a /48 for every person
    >currently alive - A /48 is 65535*18,446,744,073,709,551,616 (ie: one
    >REALLY, REALLY, _REALLY_ enormous number) addresses. Even if it were
    >only a /64 per person, which seems must more realistic, there are
    >18,446,744,073,709,551,616 addresses in a /64.


    A mere 18 quintillion, 446 quadrillion, 744 trillion, 73 billion, 709
    million and 500 thousand. :)

    DPF
    --
    E-mail:
    ICQ: 29964527
    MSN:
    DPF, Jul 27, 2003
    #6
  7. Jay

    Jay Guest

    Lennier wrote:

    > On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 20:46:34 +1000, Jay wrote:
    >
    >>> You can have your own Domain Name right now. I do, and it's easy,
    >>> especially if you don't want to host the actual website and mail
    >>> yourself.

    >>
    >> Of course you can. But that wasn't what I was saying. The op was
    >> obviously wanting to have a .home domain so he could run own domain
    >> locally. Not pointing to an external hosting site.

    >
    > If, for example, I had a domain name "my-surname.home.nz", and IF I had a
    > static IP address, I could point the DNS entry at the static IP address
    > and could then run my own email servers, my own webserver, my own
    > colaboration server, and my own DNS server - and have people who were
    > outside of my own LAN be able to look at my webserver (provided, of
    > course, that it was not within my firewall) and also send me email direct
    > to my own email server.


    I do something like that, however, I rely on an external hosting
    site for my domain. So instead of running a full domain, I run
    a masqueraded domain. From inside it looks exactly like my domain.
    From the outside it exists elsewhere. My dns server mirrors the
    external domain, plus it has private internal definitions.

    On odd occasions I have pointed mx records at my (static) ip, but
    most of the time it is much more convenient to use the external
    site which has a staff to look after things 24/7.

    It is also a simple matter to redirect http traffic from your
    external site, if you so wish. But most of the time you gain
    nothing, except people will encounter a slower bandwidth
    than your external hosting site (esp. uplink which is usually a lot
    slower than the other direction). Not to mention when you do
    a large download you are going to interfere with traffic coming to
    your site unless you take special precautions.

    >
    > That way I would no longer have to rely on my ISP's servers, and would
    > even be able to host email for other people.
    >
    > Wouldn't this be true if I had a static IP address, and a registered
    > domain name which pointed to my static IP address?


    It is one thing to have a static IP but remember that the static
    IP is assigned to your ISP. It belongs to the ISP's domain.
    But if you buy a business account then you will get your static IP
    and you will be able to host your domain, and run your proper dns
    server - but it will cost extra.

    >
    > Besides all this... what about the idea of having a ".home" subdomain to
    > complement the ".co" and ".org" and ".net" etc subdomains in NZ that are
    > already available?


    Since you'll probably need a business account how about .biz?
    Jay, Jul 27, 2003
    #7
  8. Jay

    Jay Guest

    Lennier wrote:

    > On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 22:14:15 +1000, Jay wrote:
    >
    >>> Besides all this... what about the idea of having a ".home" subdomain to
    >>> complement the ".co" and ".org" and ".net" etc subdomains in NZ that are
    >>> already available?

    >>
    >> Since you'll probably need a business account how about .biz?

    >
    > Given that I was talking about domestic use, and given that NZ already has
    > ".co" for commercial use don't you think that ".biz" is redundant?
    >


    I never created .biz, someone else did.
    It isn't my fault so don't blame me.

    > Is it really not possible to be assigned a static IP from one's ISP and
    > register a domain with some registrar somewhere, and get that domain
    > pointing to one's static IP number?


    A domain must have an IP address.
    When you buy a domain you get IP address(es).
    Normally when you sign up to an ISP you get an IP address that
    belongs to the ISPs domain.

    Unless you pay more money.
    Jay, Jul 28, 2003
    #8
  9. Jay

    Enkidu Guest

    On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 09:47:47 +0000 (UTC), (Ewen
    McNeill) wrote:
    >
    >Curiously cliffp.com seems to be set up somewhat differently from what
    >you describe:
    >

    Now there's a surprise! It's supposed to be only temporary.

    Thanks for the info though. That's really useful. It may nudge me into
    setting it up as a permanently on connection.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    Signed and sealed with Great Seal of the Executive
    Council of the Internet, by The Master of The Net.
    Enkidu, Jul 28, 2003
    #9
  10. Jay

    Enkidu Guest

    On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 20:46:34 +1000, Jay <> wrote:
    >
    >Of course you can. But that wasn't what I was saying.
    >The op was obviously wanting to have a .home domain so he
    >could run own domain locally. Not pointing to an external hosting site.
    >

    Fair call.
    >>
    >> All you need to do is point your DNS entries for your mail
    >> to your mailbox at the ISP, and the entry for your website at the IP
    >> address where it is hosted. Your ISP *will* help you with this,
    >> especially if the DNS is hosted with them.

    >
    >Your ISP doesn't need to help with hosting your domain elsewhere.
    >

    True. They will need to help you with the mail thing though.

    >> Otherwise places like
    >> www.registerdirect.co.nz will allow you to maintain your own records
    >> in their DNS (and they will provide mailboxes too). (I've never used
    >> RegisterDirect and I have no connection with them).

    >
    >And there are dynamic ones too ...


    Mmm, I don't really trust them. I'd rather pay a few bucks and do it
    properly.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    Signed and sealed with Great Seal of the Executive
    Council of the Internet, by The Master of The Net.
    Enkidu, Jul 28, 2003
    #10
  11. Jay

    Enkidu Guest

    On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 09:46:14 +1000, Jay <> wrote:
    >
    >A domain must have an IP address.
    >

    True,
    >
    >When you buy a domain you get IP address(es).
    >

    Not exactly true. While many registrars will host a website, that is
    NOT a requirement. You can register a domain name and not point it to
    an IP address at all. You might do this if you are *parking* a Domain
    Name for later use. All that you need to register a Domain Name is two
    name servers primed to accept the registration from the registrar.
    >
    >Normally when you sign up to an ISP you get an IP address that
    >belongs to the ISPs domain.
    >
    >Unless you pay more money.
    >

    Not necessarily. Any registrar will *park* your Domain for you, and
    some may even host a Web Site for you. Nothing to do with your ISP.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    Signed and sealed with Great Seal of the Executive
    Council of the Internet, by The Master of The Net.
    Enkidu, Jul 28, 2003
    #11
  12. Jay

    Enkidu Guest

    On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 18:53:13 +1200, Lennier
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 09:46:14 +1000, Jay wrote:
    >
    >>> Is it really not possible to be assigned a static IP from one's ISP and
    >>> register a domain with some registrar somewhere, and get that domain
    >>> pointing to one's static IP number?

    >>
    >> A domain must have an IP address.
    >> When you buy a domain you get IP address(es). Normally when you sign up
    >> to an ISP you get an IP address that belongs to the ISPs domain.

    >
    >Um...
    >
    >I thought that ISPs owned IP numbers which they can assign either
    >dynamically or permanently.
    >

    This is usual these days, yes. But other people and organisations
    still own IP addresses, usually from ages ago.

    >I thought that anyone can own a domain - not just ISPs, and that the
    >person or organization who owns said domain also operates the DNS server
    >that is authoritative for that domain and which knows the IP numbers that
    >correspond with the sub-domains registered in it's domain.
    >

    No one *owns* a Domain Name. Anyone can *register* one. The person who
    registers the Domain Name may host it, but in most cases an ISP or
    other organisation is delegated the hosting of it. A Domain Name is
    not tied to an IP address. A Domain Name may be associated with
    several differnet IP addresses during its lifetime. Say when a
    registrant moves between ISPs or hosting organisations. A registrant
    normally knows the IP addresses that are associated with his/her
    Domain Name, but it is not obligatory.

    >I also thought that one is supposed to tell the Registrar of one's domain
    >name what IP number one wants the DNS server to point to when it receives
    >a lookup request; and as such one can register a domain such as
    ><insertnamehere>.com.au and have it pointing to an IP number owned by Xtra
    >or Ihug or some other outfit.
    >

    This is true. But one Domain Name may have several IPs associated with
    it. www.goober.co.nz may have one IP address goober.co.nz itself may
    have another (for mail) and maybe secure.goober.co.nz might have
    another IP address.
    >
    >I thought that this is how one can register a domain name, and get one's
    >email hosted somewhere - anywhere - using that domain name.
    >
    >Is this not the case?
    >

    Yes, pretty well. might be registered at
    freeparking, DNS hosted by Xtra, with the mail actually being
    delivered to . your website www.lennier.co.nz might
    be hosted by Actrix. The trick is to get all this setup correctly.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    Signed and sealed with Great Seal of the Executive
    Council of the Internet, by The Master of The Net.
    Enkidu, Jul 28, 2003
    #12
  13. Jay

    DPF Guest

    On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 20:08:55 +1200, in nz.comp Enkidu
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 09:46:14 +1000, Jay <> wrote:
    >>
    >>A domain must have an IP address.
    >>

    >True,
    >>
    >>When you buy a domain you get IP address(es).
    >>

    >Not exactly true. While many registrars will host a website, that is
    >NOT a requirement. You can register a domain name and not point it to
    >an IP address at all. You might do this if you are *parking* a Domain
    >Name for later use. All that you need to register a Domain Name is two
    >name servers primed to accept the registration from the registrar.


    Actually you don't even need two name servers now. You can register a
    name, but not delegate it into the DNS. However most if not all
    Registrars do require name servers to be listed - but the registry
    doesn't.

    DPF
    --
    E-mail:
    ICQ: 29964527
    MSN:
    DPF, Jul 28, 2003
    #13
  14. "Lennier" <> wrote in message
    news:pan.2003.07.28.09.13.31.894386@TRACKER...
    > On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 20:35:59 +1200, Nicholas Sherlock wrote:
    >
    > >> I understand that an ISP assigns IP numbers dynamically to dialup
    > >> users. But I thought that ASDL connections were assigned permanent IP
    > >> numbers.
    > >>
    > >> IS this not the case?

    > >
    > > Changes every time you reset your router, and when you get disconnected,
    > > unless you pay extra for a truly static IP address.

    >
    > Please tell me more...
    >
    > What is involved? what does it cost?


    I did a little search, and can no longer find any mention of being able to
    get a static IP address on any of the ISPs websites I checked. Sorry :)

    Cheers,
    Nicholas Sherlock
    Nicholas Sherlock, Jul 28, 2003
    #14
  15. Jay

    Jay Guest

    Nicholas Sherlock wrote:

    > "Lennier" <> wrote in message
    > news:pan.2003.07.28.09.13.31.894386@TRACKER...
    >> On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 20:35:59 +1200, Nicholas Sherlock wrote:
    >>
    >> >> I understand that an ISP assigns IP numbers dynamically to dialup
    >> >> users. But I thought that ASDL connections were assigned permanent IP
    >> >> numbers.
    >> >>
    >> >> IS this not the case?
    >> >
    >> > Changes every time you reset your router, and when you get
    >> > disconnected, unless you pay extra for a truly static IP address.

    >>
    >> Please tell me more...
    >>
    >> What is involved? what does it cost?

    >
    > I did a little search, and can no longer find any mention of being able to
    > get a static IP address on any of the ISPs websites I checked. Sorry :)
    >


    You didn't search very far!

    Try this:

    http://www.google.com/search?q="static ip" site:.co.nz&btnG=Google Search
    Jay, Jul 29, 2003
    #15
  16. Jay

    Mark Harris Guest

    On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 20:39:34 +1200, Lennier
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 20:22:41 +1200, Enkidu wrote:
    >
    >> This is true. But one Domain Name may have several IPs associated with
    >> it. www.goober.co.nz may have one IP address goober.co.nz itself may
    >> have another (for mail) and maybe secure.goober.co.nz might have another
    >> IP address.

    >
    >I thought that in the above cases the domain goober.co.nz would also have
    >a DNS server which would point to the IP numbers for the www.goober.co.nz
    >and the secure.goober.co.nz domains - which are subdomains of the domain
    >goober.co.nz - all of which could be assigned to the same physical computer.
    >
    >IS this not the case?
    >

    IIRC, if the www and secure 4LDs are accessible to the outside world,
    they need "real" IP addresses.

    Each domain name should be thought of as a discrete lable. While you
    may structure them hierarchically (?sp) for "business" purposes (yes,
    I know you're talking about home use; "business is an elastic term,
    used here to indicate non-technical requirements), that hierarchy is
    only valid at the domain level - I think you still need to be assigned
    IP addresses for each by someone external, unless you have your own
    class C, of course ;-) but 192.168.0.x won't work as it is reserved
    for internal networks and so is not directly addressable from the
    public space.

    Your subdomains could be part of the same computer, but would need
    separate public IP addresses.

    There are services that deal with dynamic addresses. Google for
    "dynamic DNS" and see what you get.

    cheers

    mark
    --
    "Someone's been mean to you! Tell me who it is, so I can punch him tastefully."
    - Ralph Bakshi's Mighty Mouse
    Mark Harris, Jul 29, 2003
    #16
  17. Jay

    Matt B Guest

    In news:bg57dm$k8tof$-berlin.de,
    Jay <> wrote:
    > Tim wrote:
    >
    >> Jay <> wrote in
    >> news:bg4nbh$if1ub$-berlin.de:
    >>
    >>> Nicholas Sherlock wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Lennier" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:pan.2003.07.28.09.13.31.894386@TRACKER...
    >>>>> On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 20:35:59 +1200, Nicholas Sherlock wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> I understand that an ISP assigns IP numbers dynamically to
    >>>>>>> dialup users. But I thought that ASDL connections were assigned
    >>>>>>> permanent IP numbers.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> IS this not the case?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Changes every time you reset your router, and when you get
    >>>>>> disconnected, unless you pay extra for a truly static IP address.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Please tell me more...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> What is involved? what does it cost?
    >>>>
    >>>> I did a little search, and can no longer find any mention of being
    >>>> able to get a static IP address on any of the ISPs websites I
    >>>> checked. Sorry :)
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> You didn't search very far!
    >>>
    >>> Try this:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.google.com/search?q="static ip" site:.co.nz&btnG=Googl
    >>> e+Search

    >>
    >> Nicholas is referring to Jetstream Starter there - static IP's are
    >> not allowed on that service.
    >>

    >
    > What about the business JetStream product?


    Static IP = yes (for a price)

    --
    Regards,

    Matt B
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    There are 10 types of people.
    Those who get binary...
    And those who don't.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Matt B, Jul 29, 2003
    #17
  18. Jay

    Enkidu Guest

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 07:41:27 GMT, (Mark Harris)
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 20:39:34 +1200, Lennier
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 20:22:41 +1200, Enkidu wrote:
    >>
    >>> This is true. But one Domain Name may have several IPs associated with
    >>> it. www.goober.co.nz may have one IP address goober.co.nz itself may
    >>> have another (for mail) and maybe secure.goober.co.nz might have another
    >>> IP address.

    >>
    >>I thought that in the above cases the domain goober.co.nz would also have
    >>a DNS server which would point to the IP numbers for the www.goober.co.nz
    >>and the secure.goober.co.nz domains - which are subdomains of the domain
    >>goober.co.nz - all of which could be assigned to the same physical computer.
    >>
    >>IS this not the case?
    >>

    >IIRC, if the www and secure 4LDs are accessible to the outside world,
    >they need "real" IP addresses.
    >

    No, they can be "aliases" or CNAMEs.

    >Each domain name should be thought of as a discrete lable. While you
    >may structure them hierarchically (?sp) for "business" purposes (yes,
    >I know you're talking about home use; "business is an elastic term,
    >used here to indicate non-technical requirements), that hierarchy is
    >only valid at the domain level - I think you still need to be assigned
    >IP addresses for each by someone external, unless you have your own
    >class C, of course ;-) but 192.168.0.x won't work as it is reserved
    >for internal networks and so is not directly addressable from the
    >public space.
    >
    >Your subdomains could be part of the same computer, but would need
    >separate public IP addresses.
    >

    No, they can be the same. Or they can be different.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    Signed and sealed with Great Seal of the Executive
    Council of the Internet, by The Master of The Net.
    Enkidu, Jul 29, 2003
    #18
  19. Jay

    lily Guest

    "Lennier" <> wrote in message
    news:pan.2003.07.29.10.30.26.968899@TRACKER...
    > USB support landed with the 2.5.x kernel.


    2.4
    lily, Jul 29, 2003
    #19
  20. Jay

    Fran Guest

    Lennier wrote:

    > On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 22:54:51 +1200, lily wrote:
    >
    >>> USB support landed with the 2.5.x kernel.

    >>
    >> 2.4

    >
    > I thought that only partial support landed with 2.4 kernel.
    >
    > I believe that full USB 2.0 support is included with the 2.6 kernel.
    >
    > Is this correct?
    >
    > Lennier
    >


    My usb external drive, network adapter, mouse, Logitec camera, etc all work
    in 2.4

    What's the difference between "partial" and "full" in this instance?

    Ahh! possibly that "USB 2.0" bit maybe.
    I don't have a usb2 adapter to try though.

    Fran
    :):):)
    Fran, Jul 29, 2003
    #20
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