Re: ac adapter and wattage for notebook computer

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by G.G. Willikers, Feb 11, 2008.

  1. Drew wrote:
    > Hi Gang:
    >
    > On a friend's Compaq notebook that calls for a 90W power adapter (the
    > AC Adapter connector has 90W labeled above it), he is using an HP AC
    > Adapter that is 75W.
    >
    > Is this safe to do or could it damage the notebook? I wasn't sure
    > since the wattage on the power supply is lower than what the notebook
    > wants?
    >
    > Is this safe or a big no no?
    >
    > Drew


    it will work, but the battery will never get optimally charged.

    Ebay is your friend.

    --
    The RIGHT REVEREND G.G. WILLIKERS
    (formerly) Monsignor Boddom
    G.G. Willikers, Feb 11, 2008
    #1
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  2. G.G. Willikers

    John O Guest

    >
    > but the battery will never get optimally charged.


    Drew didn't provide enough info to be able to say that with any
    certainty...unless you know that all HP supplies have a lower voltage
    compared to Compaq supplies. :)

    -John O
    John O, Feb 11, 2008
    #2
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  3. John O wrote:
    >> but the battery will never get optimally charged.

    >
    > Drew didn't provide enough info to be able to say that with any
    > certainty...unless you know that all HP supplies have a lower voltage
    > compared to Compaq supplies. :)
    >
    >

    My EXPERIENCE as a laptop technician and having read the MANUALS
    regarding this subject give credence to my answer.

    HP makes all sorts of power supplies. So does Compaq. Belive it or not
    they can be cross compatible.

    His problem is that he does not have the 90W power supply that goes with
    his laptop. He wanted to know if using a lesser 75W adapter would be
    detrimental to his laptop.

    The answer is NO, it will not harm it.

    And to further add info to this, I do believe at power up the HP laptop
    will actually display a warning message about using a lesser power
    supply and the battery not being charged optimally.


    So John O, before you go leaping off the bridge make sure you know what
    your talking about. :)

    --
    The RIGHT REVEREND G.G. WILLIKERS
    (formerly) Monsignor Boddom
    G.G. Willikers, Feb 11, 2008
    #3
  4. G.G. Willikers

    John O Guest

    >
    > So John O, before you go leaping off the bridge make sure you know what
    > your talking about. :)


    Yeah.

    So, does a lower max power mean the supply has a lower output voltage or
    that it can provide comparatively less current at the same or even a higher
    voltage? The power rating of a supply is meaningless by itself, and your
    answer to Drew may be invalid or accurate depending on the answer to this
    question. And you can't answer this question unless you have more info from
    Drew than I have so far.

    IOW, it's not me who's leaping. :)

    -John O
    John O, Feb 12, 2008
    #4
  5. John O wrote:
    >> So John O, before you go leaping off the bridge make sure you know what
    >> your talking about. :)

    >
    > Yeah.
    >
    > So, does a lower max power mean the supply has a lower output voltage or
    > that it can provide comparatively less current at the same or even a higher
    > voltage? The power rating of a supply is meaningless by itself, and your
    > answer to Drew may be invalid or accurate depending on the answer to this
    > question. And you can't answer this question unless you have more info from
    > Drew than I have so far.
    >
    > IOW, it's not me who's leaping. :)
    >
    > -John O
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >


    He states that he has a 75W HP PSU.
    He says he has a 90W HP laptop.
    He says he's worried that the 75W PSU will damage his laptop.
    Based on this information and being quite familiar with HP products,
    especially laptop repair, I am confident that my answer is adequate to
    the question posed.


    --
    The RIGHT REVEREND G.G. WILLIKERS
    (formerly) Monsignor Boddom
    G.G. Willikers, Feb 12, 2008
    #5
  6. G.G. Willikers

    Mister Guest

    Wow! Soon the ruler will be out to measure!

    I have used a smaller wattage PSU on a laptop already and the only
    thing that happened was the battery never fully charged and the PSU
    got a little bit hotter.

    Now, the only place I am leaping is for another Jack and Coke!

    Fixing computers sober is no longer a challenge! Heh! Heh! Heh!


    On Tue, 12 Feb 2008 03:03:11 GMT, "G.G. Willikers" <>
    wrote:

    >John O wrote:
    >>> So John O, before you go leaping off the bridge make sure you know what
    >>> your talking about. :)

    >>
    >> Yeah.
    >>
    >> So, does a lower max power mean the supply has a lower output voltage or
    >> that it can provide comparatively less current at the same or even a higher
    >> voltage? The power rating of a supply is meaningless by itself, and your
    >> answer to Drew may be invalid or accurate depending on the answer to this
    >> question. And you can't answer this question unless you have more info from
    >> Drew than I have so far.
    >>
    >> IOW, it's not me who's leaping. :)
    >>
    >> -John O
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >He states that he has a 75W HP PSU.
    >He says he has a 90W HP laptop.
    >He says he's worried that the 75W PSU will damage his laptop.
    >Based on this information and being quite familiar with HP products,
    >especially laptop repair, I am confident that my answer is adequate to
    >the question posed.
    Mister, Feb 12, 2008
    #6
  7. G.G. Willikers

    John O Guest

    >
    > He states that he has a 75W HP PSU.
    > He says he has a 90W HP laptop.
    > He says he's worried that the 75W PSU will damage his laptop.
    > Based on this information and being quite familiar with HP products,
    > especially laptop repair, I am confident that my answer is adequate to the
    > question posed.


    Confidence is a good thing, but you can't fix much with logic like that.
    Good luck to you.

    -John O
    John O, Feb 12, 2008
    #7
  8. John O wrote:
    >> He states that he has a 75W HP PSU.
    >> He says he has a 90W HP laptop.
    >> He says he's worried that the 75W PSU will damage his laptop.
    >> Based on this information and being quite familiar with HP products,
    >> especially laptop repair, I am confident that my answer is adequate to the
    >> question posed.

    >
    > Confidence is a good thing, but you can't fix much with logic like that.
    > Good luck to you.
    >
    > -John O
    >
    >
    >

    3000 refurbished / imaged / donated last year, I think I can handle it.

    --
    The RIGHT REVEREND G.G. WILLIKERS
    (formerly) Monsignor Boddom
    G.G. Willikers, Feb 12, 2008
    #8
  9. Barry Watzman wrote:
    > And I do believe you are wrong.
    >
    > Only Dell does anything like this, and they complain because, and only
    > because, it's not a Dell supply. Regardless of the electrical
    > characteristics of the supply, which may be an exact match for what the
    > laptop needs.
    >
    >
    > G.G. Willikers wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> And to further add info to this, I do believe at power up the HP
    >> laptop will actually display a warning message about using a lesser
    >> power supply and the battery not being charged optimally.


    You know I couldn't exactly remember whether I read it on the site or on
    a screen.

    I work with so many different makes and models it is hard to keep track.

    --
    The RIGHT REVEREND G.G. WILLIKERS
    (formerly) Monsignor Boddom
    G.G. Willikers, Feb 18, 2008
    #9
  10. G.G. Willikers

    smackedass Guest

    >
    > Only Dell does anything like this, and they complain because, and only
    > because, it's not a Dell supply. Regardless of the electrical
    > characteristics of the supply, which may be an exact match for what the
    > laptop needs.


    This may sound like a stupid question, but does the form factor/size of the
    charging pin constitute any difference?

    smackedass
    smackedass, Feb 20, 2008
    #10
  11. G.G. Willikers

    John O Guest

    "smackedass" <> wrote in message
    news:ykVuj.16370$eg3.14590@trndny05...
    > >
    >> Only Dell does anything like this, and they complain because, and only
    >> because, it's not a Dell supply. Regardless of the electrical
    >> characteristics of the supply, which may be an exact match for what the
    >> laptop needs.

    >
    > This may sound like a stupid question, but does the form factor/size of
    > the charging pin constitute any difference?
    >


    No, it's just a physical choice they make. It used to be that all those
    supplies were just dumb power providers. Lately, especially since Li-Ion,
    the systems have become a lot smarter. For example all the Li-Ion battery
    packs have ICs and there's communication between the charging circuits and
    the pack. Same is becoming true of supplies. The Dell supply I currently use
    has three pins. The center post has something to do with charging the
    battery. If it's missing the battery won't charge, but I don't know if
    that's because the laprop doesn't get the okey-dokey from the supply, of if
    that's where the charging current is supplied.

    -John O
    John O, Feb 20, 2008
    #11
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