Re: A late bloomer in the S gallery

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by otter, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. otter

    otter Guest

    On Aug 11, 6:35 pm, Bowser <> wrote:
    > Late, very late. But the board voted to allow them since the shooter
    > once ran this fiasco.
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/shootin/letter_s


    Of the 3, I liked stealth the best.

    Nice picture, borderline wall-worthy.

    The blob makes an otherwise ordinary picture interesting.

    Nit-picks:
    - I'd prefer the focus on the eye to be crisper. The focus seems to
    be on the scales at the armpit. The DOF of this lens is razor-thin,
    so I can appreciate the difficulty.
    - Usually better for a subject to face into more space. Don't know
    how you could do that with a picture like this, though, without losing
    the tail. Eh, rules were made to be broken.
     
    otter, Aug 12, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. otter

    PeterN Guest

    On 8/12/2011 9:39 AM, otter wrote:
    > On Aug 11, 6:35 pm, Bowser<> wrote:
    >> Late, very late. But the board voted to allow them since the shooter
    >> once ran this fiasco.
    >>
    >> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/letter_s

    >
    > Of the 3, I liked stealth the best.
    >
    > Nice picture, borderline wall-worthy.
    >
    > The blob makes an otherwise ordinary picture interesting.


    It is an interesting shot. I don't see any interest in the image to the
    left of the OOF blob.


    >



    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Aug 12, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. otter

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 10:59:15 -0400, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:
    : On 2011-08-12 09:39 , otter wrote:
    : > - Usually better for a subject to face into more space. Don't know
    : > how you could do that with a picture like this, though, without losing
    : > the tail. Eh, rules were made to be broken.

    That rule applies to a subject who is moving in the direction that he's
    looking or at least looking at what he's facing. Neither of those cases
    applies to the lizard.

    : The shot is cropped from http://gallery.photo.net/photo/14000693-lg.jpg
    : and the objective was to eliminate the BG distraction on the right and
    : focus on the lizard. Though I have to say the backlit FG bokeh on the
    : right has some redeeming qualities, it did not contribute to the
    : 'stealth' title.
    :
    : As to the subject facing into more space, I would agree conventionally,
    : but in this case only if there were prey to the right. (Note that the
    : lizard almost always attacked 60 - 90° off his nose (eg to the sides)).

    Of course, because the lizard's field of vision is primarily to his sides, a
    characteristic of most prey animals. It's predators who have forward-looking,
    binary vision. The lizard is quick enough, and his food sources abundant
    enough, that he usually doesn't have to chase a meal. But he does have to
    worry about becoming one.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 12, 2011
    #3
  4. otter

    otter Guest

    On Aug 12, 2:49 pm, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 10:59:15 -0400, Alan Browne<> wrote:
    >
    > : On 2011-08-12 09:39 , otter wrote:
    > : > - Usually better for a subject to face into more space.  Don't know
    > : > how you could do that with a picture like this, though, without losing
    > : > the tail.  Eh, rules were made to be broken.
    >
    > That rule applies to a subject who is moving in the direction that he's
    > looking or at least looking at what he's facing. Neither of those cases
    > applies to the lizard.


    I had no idea the rule was so complicated.

    But you are right!

    It is right there in section 5.3 sub-paragraph 6: "Lizards can do
    anything they damn well please".
     
    otter, Aug 13, 2011
    #4
  5. otter

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 23:18:31 -0700 (PDT), otter <>
    wrote:
    : On Aug 12, 2:49 pm, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    : > On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 10:59:15 -0400, Alan Browne<> wrote:
    : >
    : > : On 2011-08-12 09:39 , otter wrote:
    : > : > - Usually better for a subject to face into more space.  Don't know
    : > : > how you could do that with a picture like this, though, without losing
    : > : > the tail.  Eh, rules were made to be broken.
    : >
    : > That rule applies to a subject who is moving in the direction that he's
    : > looking or at least looking at what he's facing. Neither of those cases
    : > applies to the lizard.
    :
    : I had no idea the rule was so complicated.
    :
    : But you are right!
    :
    : It is right there in section 5.3 sub-paragraph 6: "Lizards can do
    : anything they damn well please".

    The last time I was in the aquarium in Chicago, they had a komodo dragon.
    "What a photo op!" thought I. I figured he'd at least pace around, hungrily
    eyeing the kids that had their faces pressed against the glass. But when I got
    there, he was curled up in a corner of his cage asleep. (At least it was a
    corner up front where the kids could get a good look at him.) When I stopped
    by on my way out two or three hours later, he had moved slightly but was still
    asleep. Maybe Komodo dragons are the laziest lizards, as well as the largest.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 13, 2011
    #5
  6. otter

    PeterN Guest

    On 8/13/2011 8:04 AM, Robert Coe wrote:
    > On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 23:18:31 -0700 (PDT), otter<>
    > wrote:
    > : On Aug 12, 2:49 pm, Robert Coe<> wrote:
    > :> On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 10:59:15 -0400, Alan Browne<> wrote:
    > :>
    > :> : On 2011-08-12 09:39 , otter wrote:
    > :> :> - Usually better for a subject to face into more space. Don't know
    > :> :> how you could do that with a picture like this, though, without losing
    > :> :> the tail. Eh, rules were made to be broken.
    > :>
    > :> That rule applies to a subject who is moving in the direction that he's
    > :> looking or at least looking at what he's facing. Neither of those cases
    > :> applies to the lizard.
    > :
    > : I had no idea the rule was so complicated.
    > :
    > : But you are right!
    > :
    > : It is right there in section 5.3 sub-paragraph 6: "Lizards can do
    > : anything they damn well please".
    >
    > The last time I was in the aquarium in Chicago, they had a komodo dragon.
    > "What a photo op!" thought I. I figured he'd at least pace around, hungrily
    > eyeing the kids that had their faces pressed against the glass. But when I got
    > there, he was curled up in a corner of his cage asleep. (At least it was a
    > corner up front where the kids could get a good look at him.) When I stopped
    > by on my way out two or three hours later, he had moved slightly but was still
    > asleep. Maybe Komodo dragons are the laziest lizards, as well as the largest.
    >


    Dontcha know birds and animals have meetings where they discuss
    photographers. Whenever they see a photographer the turn away, or go to
    sleep. As soon as you put your camera down, the get photogenic. Put the
    camera to your eye and the pose ends quickly. the Komodo must have gone
    to the meeting.


    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Aug 13, 2011
    #6
  7. otter

    John Turco Guest

    PeterN wrote:
    >
    > > On 8/13/2011 8:04 AM, Robert Coe wrote:


    <edited for brevity>

    > > The last time I was in the aquarium in Chicago, they had a komodo dragon.
    > > "What a photo op!" thought I. I figured he'd at least pace around, hungrily
    > > eyeing the kids that had their faces pressed against the glass. But when I got
    > > there, he was curled up in a corner of his cage asleep. (At least it was a
    > > corner up front where the kids could get a good look at him.) When I stopped
    > > by on my way out two or three hours later, he had moved slightly but was still
    > > asleep. Maybe Komodo dragons are the laziest lizards, as well as the largest.

    >
    >
    > Dontcha know birds and animals have meetings where they discuss
    > photographers. Whenever they see a photographer the turn away, or go to
    > sleep. As soon as you put your camera down, the get photogenic. Put the
    > camera to your eye and the pose ends quickly. the Komodo must have gone
    > to the meeting.



    Or, maybe...the komodo was in the commode?

    --
    Cordially,
    John Turco <>

    Marie's Musings <http://fairiesandtails.blogspot.com>
     
    John Turco, Aug 18, 2011
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Bernhard Wagner

    WPA2 with 802.1x - network startup too late

    Bernhard Wagner, Jul 28, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    6,565
    Jerry Peterson[MSFT]
    Aug 9, 2005
  2. Kenny
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    982
    Kenny
    Nov 8, 2005
  3. J Bard
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    422
    J Joyce
    Dec 11, 2003
  4. LM

    late-dropped out pkts?

    LM, Feb 19, 2004, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    977
  5. Tim Conway

    Re: [SI] A late bloomer in the S gallery

    Tim Conway, Aug 12, 2011, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    379
    John Turco
    Aug 18, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page