Re: 35mm film VS digital

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Stefan Patric, Aug 28, 2008.

  1. On Wed, 27 Aug 2008 10:03:29 -0400, Bob Donahue wrote:

    > Just curious what people think about this comparison. IMHO, the current
    > crop of digital cameras blow away 35mm film, at least color print film.
    > (Remember grain? I was never satisfied with 8x10s blown up from 35mm
    > film.)


    I guess you've never seen prints from Kodak Ektar 25 color negative film
    then. ISO 25. No grain. Smooth tonality. Too contrasty for normal
    bright sunlight. No exposure latitude. A difficult film to work with,
    but if you knew what you were doing, you could make 20 x 30 prints that
    would knock your socks off. And, it came in 120 roll film, too! Too
    bad, neither lasted.

    Stef
     
    Stefan Patric, Aug 28, 2008
    #1
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  2. On Aug 28, 12:32 am, Stefan Patric <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 27 Aug 2008 10:03:29 -0400, Bob Donahue wrote:
    > > Just curious what people think about this comparison. IMHO, the current
    > > crop of digital cameras blow away 35mm film, at least color print film.
    > > (Remember grain? I was never satisfied with 8x10s blown up from 35mm
    > > film.)

    >
    > I guess you've never seen prints from Kodak Ektar 25 color negative film
    > then.  ISO 25.  No grain.  Smooth tonality.  Too contrasty for normal
    > bright sunlight.  No exposure latitude.  A difficult film to work with,
    > but if you knew what you were doing, you could make 20 x 30 prints that
    > would knock your socks off.  And, it came in 120 roll film, too!  Too
    > bad, neither lasted.
    >
    > Stef


    That was great film. I shot many rolls of it as a tester for Kodak.
    Those days are gone, sad.
    Jeff Roush
    photo instructor
    http://www.roushphotoonline.com
     
    RoushPhotoOnline.com, Aug 28, 2008
    #2
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  3. Stefan Patric

    -hh Guest

    "RoushPhotoOnline.com" <> wrote:
    > Stefan Patric <> wrote:
    > >
    > > I guess you've never seen prints from Kodak
    > > Ektar 25 color negative film then.  ISO 25.
    > > No grain....A difficult film to work with,
    > > but if you knew what you were doing...

    >
    > That was great film.  I shot many rolls of
    > it as a tester for Kodak.
    > Those days are gone, sad.


    *Almost* gone.

    There's still a few rolls stashed in cold storage, although it is
    becoming questionable as to how well it would be holding up after so
    many years on ice.

    FWIW, who would you recommend as a trustworthy C41 developer for now-
    obscure emulsions such as this?


    -hh
     
    -hh, Aug 28, 2008
    #3
  4. Stefan Patric

    -hh Guest

    "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote:
    >
    > I thought that "C41" was the name of the
    > developing process used for those films.


    You are correct.

    And FYI, the Kodak Ektar 25 {was/is} a C41 chemistry film, which was
    why I asked the question.


    > If you don't mind B&W...


    Then I'd shoot B&W.

    Fortunately, I still have a reasonably broad amount of good films
    available to use. The general challenge I've run into is all of the
    local developers who were of professional grade quality have closed
    operations, so I'm searching for equal-quality mail-order
    alternatives.

    I've found a place that does good work on E6, but I'm still looking
    for C41.

    FWIW, I still have some Kodachrome too, so recommendations for a good
    K-14 developer would be nice too...its just not as high of a personal
    priority, as I think the last time I shot any K64/K25 was in Peru in
    2004, which was done very specifically for the timeless Kodachrome
    look.


    -hh
     
    -hh, Aug 28, 2008
    #4
  5. On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 05:58:52 -0700, -hh wrote:

    > "RoushPhotoOnline.com" <> wrote:
    >> Stefan Patric <> wrote:
    >> >
    >> > I guess you've never seen prints from Kodak Ektar 25 color negative
    >> > film then.  ISO 25. No grain....A difficult film to work with, but if
    >> > you knew what you were doing...

    >>
    >> That was great film.  I shot many rolls of it as a tester for Kodak.
    >> Those days are gone, sad.

    >
    > *Almost* gone.
    >
    > There's still a few rolls stashed in cold storage, although it is
    > becoming questionable as to how well it would be holding up after so
    > many years on ice.
    >
    > FWIW, who would you recommend as a trustworthy C41 developer for now-
    > obscure emulsions such as this?


    That's a good question for which I don't have a good answer.

    I'd start by trying to find a pro lab in your city. I'm sure, if they no
    longer process film, they probably know who still does or they out-lab
    the film for processing, then print it locally.

    Or you could buy a Jobo ATL-1000 film processor off eBay, and do it
    yourself. They're probably very inexpensive by now. ;-)
     
    Stefan Patric, Aug 29, 2008
    #5
  6. Stefan Patric

    -hh Guest

    Stefan Patric <> wrote:
    >
    > I'd start by trying to find a pro lab in your city.  


    Used to use them. What didn't help was that all 3 of them went out in
    <6 months.


    > Or you could buy a Jobo ATL-1000 film processor off eBay, and
    > do it yourself. They're probably very inexpensive by now.  ;-)


    Sure, if I had someplace to put it; to set one up, I'd pretty much
    have to rent space...but then I'd be able to have a full darkroom with
    Bessler enlarger, etc. Because I couldn't take the gear, I did
    encourage the owner of the one E6 Pro lab to see if the local Art
    school was interested in his equipment for free, but they didn't see
    film/darkroom as an 'art' that's yet worth preserving the skills.


    -hh
     
    -hh, Aug 29, 2008
    #6
  7. On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 18:40:10 -0700, -hh wrote:

    > Stefan Patric <> wrote:
    >>
    >> I'd start by trying to find a pro lab in your city.

    >
    > Used to use them. What didn't help was that all 3 of them went out in
    > <6 months.


    Obsolescence: The result of progress.

    >
    >> Or you could buy a Jobo ATL-1000 film processor off eBay, and do it
    >> yourself. They're probably very inexpensive by now.  ;-)

    >
    > Sure, if I had someplace to put it; to set one up, I'd pretty much have
    > to rent space...but then I'd be able to have a full darkroom with
    > Bessler enlarger, etc. Because I couldn't take the gear, I did
    > encourage the owner of the one E6 Pro lab to see if the local Art school
    > was interested in his equipment for free, but they didn't see
    > film/darkroom as an 'art' that's yet worth preserving the skills.


    Actually, you don't need a darkroom to process film in the ATL-1000 or
    its replacement, the ATL-1500. They both are about the size of laser
    printer and sit just fine on a kitchen counter. They use daylight Jobo
    tanks, and all you need to load them is a daylight changing bag.

    http://www.jobousadarkroom.com/instructions/instructions_manual_atl-1500_00.htm


    Stef
     
    Stefan Patric, Aug 30, 2008
    #7
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