raw exposure guide?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by peter, Feb 13, 2007.

  1. peter

    peter Guest

    When I open a raw canon file (cr2) in photoshop cs2, there are some settings
    unfamiliar to me. Let's start with the first one:

    What is "exposure"? How does it differ from brightness, contrast,
    saturation, ..?

    Is there a guide on how to use this control in combination with the other
    controls?
     
    peter, Feb 13, 2007
    #1
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  2. peter

    tomm42 Guest

    On Feb 13, 4:44 am, "peter" <> wrote:
    > When I open a raw canon file (cr2) in photoshop cs2, there are some settings
    > unfamiliar to me. Let's start with the first one:
    >
    > What is "exposure"? How does it differ from brightness, contrast,
    > saturation, ..?
    >
    > Is there a guide on how to use this control in combination with the other
    > controls?



    What not to do with Adobe RAW CS2 is to leave things in default or
    where they fall. I always use exposure first to bring the image to
    where I want it visually, along with color temp, then use shadow,
    brightness, contrast and saturation to fine tune. Under the calibrate
    section of the program there are setting to further bring the program
    to understand your camera.
    I find the exposure setting to be a little mistifying in that I'll
    shoot with a good histogram and the exposure setting may be a stop
    high or low. If exposure is on the mius side of the scale you can
    induce noise in the image by setting it closer to O. With a Nikon the
    noise can be reduced by using the Color Noise slider under the Details
    tab.
    I understand Adobe RAW has been completely changed for the better in
    CS3 and Lightroom.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Feb 13, 2007
    #2
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  3. peter

    jdear64 Guest

    On Feb 13, 7:58 am, "tomm42" <> wrote:
    > On Feb 13, 4:44 am, "peter" <> wrote:
    >
    > > When I open a raw canon file (cr2) in photoshop cs2, there are some settings
    > > unfamiliar to me. Let's start with the first one:

    >
    > > What is "exposure"? How does it differ from brightness, contrast,
    > > saturation, ..?

    >
    > > Is there a guide on how to use this control in combination with the other
    > > controls?

    >
    > What not to do with Adobe RAW CS2 is to leave things in default or
    > where they fall. I always use exposure first to bring the image to
    > where I want it visually, along with color temp, then use shadow,
    > brightness, contrast and saturation to fine tune. Under the calibrate
    > section of the program there are setting to further bring the program
    > to understand your camera.
    > I find the exposure setting to be a little mistifying in that I'll
    > shoot with a good histogram and the exposure setting may be a stop
    > high or low. If exposure is on the mius side of the scale you can
    > induce noise in the image by setting it closer to O. With a Nikon the
    > noise can be reduced by using the Color Noise slider under the Details
    > tab.
    > I understand Adobe RAW has been completely changed for the better in
    > CS3 and Lightroom.
    >
    > Tom


    The way I normally use ACR is to:

    1) Adjust color temperature
    2) Adjust exposure so that the brightest areas of the photo
    are just below clipping.
    3) Adjust shadow to be just above clipping.
    4) Adjust brightness for over all lighting.
    5) Adjust contrast and/or curves to get correct contrast.

    My way of thinking is by adjusting the photo this way I am getting the
    highest dynamic range of the photograph. Of course not all photos
    work well this way. Some photos you have to let some highlights clip
    or be well below clipping and others you have to let the shadows be
    well above the clipping point. This method is for an average photo.

    Since I am just an amateur, I'd like to hear from others about their
    best methods for using ACR.


    John
     
    jdear64, Feb 13, 2007
    #3
  4. jdear64 wrote:
    > On Feb 13, 7:58 am, "tomm42" <> wrote:
    >> On Feb 13, 4:44 am, "peter" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> When I open a raw canon file (cr2) in photoshop cs2, there are some settings
    >>> unfamiliar to me. Let's start with the first one:
    >>> What is "exposure"? How does it differ from brightness, contrast,
    >>> saturation, ..?
    >>> Is there a guide on how to use this control in combination with the other
    >>> controls?

    >> What not to do with Adobe RAW CS2 is to leave things in default or
    >> where they fall. I always use exposure first to bring the image to
    >> where I want it visually, along with color temp, then use shadow,
    >> brightness, contrast and saturation to fine tune. Under the calibrate
    >> section of the program there are setting to further bring the program
    >> to understand your camera.
    >> I find the exposure setting to be a little mistifying in that I'll
    >> shoot with a good histogram and the exposure setting may be a stop
    >> high or low. If exposure is on the mius side of the scale you can
    >> induce noise in the image by setting it closer to O. With a Nikon the
    >> noise can be reduced by using the Color Noise slider under the Details
    >> tab.
    >> I understand Adobe RAW has been completely changed for the better in
    >> CS3 and Lightroom.
    >>
    >> Tom

    >
    > The way I normally use ACR is to:
    >
    > 1) Adjust color temperature
    > 2) Adjust exposure so that the brightest areas of the photo
    > are just below clipping.
    > 3) Adjust shadow to be just above clipping.
    > 4) Adjust brightness for over all lighting.
    > 5) Adjust contrast and/or curves to get correct contrast.
    >
    > My way of thinking is by adjusting the photo this way I am getting the
    > highest dynamic range of the photograph. Of course not all photos
    > work well this way. Some photos you have to let some highlights clip
    > or be well below clipping and others you have to let the shadows be
    > well above the clipping point. This method is for an average photo.
    >
    > Since I am just an amateur, I'd like to hear from others about their
    > best methods for using ACR.


    This sounds right. There are many other ways, and Photoshop CS3 and
    Lightroom have new controls that make adjustments more flexible, perhaps
    easier to understand. Brightness control in LR deals with the midtones.

    To the OP, though, if you're unclear as to what exposure is, I'd suggest
    a course or two on basic photography or a beginning course in Photoshop
    if available where you live.

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Feb 13, 2007
    #4
  5. peter

    Paul Mitchum Guest

    peter <> wrote:

    > When I open a raw canon file (cr2) in photoshop cs2, there are some
    > settings unfamiliar to me. Let's start with the first one:
    >
    > What is "exposure"? How does it differ from brightness, contrast,
    > saturation, ..?
    >
    > Is there a guide on how to use this control in combination with the other
    > controls?


    'Exposure' is an EV compensation. It's measured in EV units, equivalent
    to stops.

    Adjust it and watch the histogram. The whole thing will move left or
    right depending on how you move the slider.

    'Brightness' makes bright things brighter. 'Shadows' makes dark things
    darker. They differ from 'exposure' in that it makes *everything* either
    darker or brighter, depending on which way you move the little slider.

    'Contrast' makes dark things darker and bright things brighter at the
    same time.

    'Saturation' alters the colors to be more... saturated. :) It basically
    makes colors more colorful.
     
    Paul Mitchum, Feb 13, 2007
    #5
  6. peter

    peter Guest

    "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message news:eek:P->
    > To the OP, though, if you're unclear as to what exposure is, I'd suggest a
    > course or two on basic photography or a beginning course in Photoshop if
    > available where you live.


    I understand exposure setting at the time of snapping the photo, not while
    processing raw file.

    Now that the photo is taken, how come I get to set the exposure again? Does
    it imply the raw file contains more dynamic range than even adobeRGB so that
    I can change exposure by a stop over or under without clipping?

    If that's the case, then I understand how to use the exposure control now.
    Just pretend I'm taking the picture again.
     
    peter, Feb 14, 2007
    #6
  7. peter wrote:
    > "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message news:eek:P->
    >> To the OP, though, if you're unclear as to what exposure is, I'd suggest a
    >> course or two on basic photography or a beginning course in Photoshop if
    >> available where you live.

    >
    > I understand exposure setting at the time of snapping the photo, not while
    > processing raw file.
    >
    > Now that the photo is taken, how come I get to set the exposure again? Does
    > it imply the raw file contains more dynamic range than even adobeRGB so that
    > I can change exposure by a stop over or under without clipping?


    Yeah, that's pretty darn close to it.
    >
    > If that's the case, then I understand how to use the exposure control now.
    > Just pretend I'm taking the picture again.


    Well, it won't do everything, but for me, WB is the primo. I can leave
    my camera set on auto WB all the time ( I don't) and in the RAW
    processor (I prefer Lightroom) I can color correct one photo in a shoot
    and apply that correction across the whole in one operation.

    There's more, but that's a start.

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Feb 14, 2007
    #7
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