Rate-limits Cisco Router

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by c1tc, Apr 20, 2005.

  1. c1tc

    c1tc Guest

    Hi all

    I have a cisco router which uses rate-limits to control traffic inbound
    and outbound of each interface. The router is a 3600 and here is an
    example of one of the interfaces:

    interface Serial2/2
    bandwidth 2048
    ip address 10.x.x.x 255.x.x.x
    ip verify unicast reverse-path
    no ip redirects
    no ip proxy-arp
    rate-limit input 1024000 25000 25000 conform-action transmit
    exceed-action drop
    rate-limit output 1024000 25000 25000 conform-action transmit
    exceed-action drop
    ip summary-address eigrp x 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 5
    no ip mroute-cache
    ntp broadcast
    no cdp enable

    Can someone please explain how the rate limits work?

    Many thanks
     
    c1tc, Apr 20, 2005
    #1
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  2. c1tc

    John Smith Guest

    Hi, I wonder if this helps at all?

    http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122cgcr/fqos_r/qrfcmd8.htm#wp1037428

    Basically on your example here

    rate-limit input 1024000 25000 25000 conform-action transmit exceed-action
    drop

    this is a looking at data coming into the interface and limiting it to 1
    megabit/s,

    "conform-action transmit" means, "transmit anything that is below 1
    megabit/s"

    and this bit "exceed-action drop" means, "drop anything that is above 1
    megabit/s"

    The other two numbers are
    burst-normal - Normal burst size, in bytes. The minimum value is bps divided
    by 2000."
    burst-max which means - Excess burst size, in bytes

    Though I must admit I don't really understand what those burst-normal and
    burst-max actually mean. Maybe someone else can explain.



    Regards

    Paul


    "c1tc" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi all
    >
    > I have a cisco router which uses rate-limits to control traffic inbound
    > and outbound of each interface. The router is a 3600 and here is an
    > example of one of the interfaces:
    >
    > interface Serial2/2
    > bandwidth 2048
    > ip address 10.x.x.x 255.x.x.x
    > ip verify unicast reverse-path
    > no ip redirects
    > no ip proxy-arp
    > rate-limit input 1024000 25000 25000 conform-action transmit
    > exceed-action drop
    > rate-limit output 1024000 25000 25000 conform-action transmit
    > exceed-action drop
    > ip summary-address eigrp x 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 5
    > no ip mroute-cache
    > ntp broadcast
    > no cdp enable
    >
    > Can someone please explain how the rate limits work?
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
     
    John Smith, Apr 20, 2005
    #2
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  3. c1tc

    c1tc Guest

    Thanks Paul,

    Can anyone else explain the difference between Normal and Excess burst
    rates and how they work?? I have read the Cisco literature but looking
    for an explanation in simple terms!

    Also will the Bandwidth command have any effect on the traffic allowed
    through the interface?

    cheers




    "John Smith" <> wrote in message news:<d46548$g73$>...
    > Hi, I wonder if this helps at all?
    >
    > http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122cgcr/fqos_r/qrfcmd8.htm#wp1037428
    >
    > Basically on your example here
    >
    > rate-limit input 1024000 25000 25000 conform-action transmit exceed-action
    > drop
    >
    > this is a looking at data coming into the interface and limiting it to 1
    > megabit/s,
    >
    > "conform-action transmit" means, "transmit anything that is below 1
    > megabit/s"
    >
    > and this bit "exceed-action drop" means, "drop anything that is above 1
    > megabit/s"
    >
    > The other two numbers are
    > burst-normal - Normal burst size, in bytes. The minimum value is bps divided
    > by 2000."
    > burst-max which means - Excess burst size, in bytes
    >
    > Though I must admit I don't really understand what those burst-normal and
    > burst-max actually mean. Maybe someone else can explain.
    >
    >
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Paul
    >
    >
    > "c1tc" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi all
    > >
    > > I have a cisco router which uses rate-limits to control traffic inbound
    > > and outbound of each interface. The router is a 3600 and here is an
    > > example of one of the interfaces:
    > >
    > > interface Serial2/2
    > > bandwidth 2048
    > > ip address 10.x.x.x 255.x.x.x
    > > ip verify unicast reverse-path
    > > no ip redirects
    > > no ip proxy-arp
    > > rate-limit input 1024000 25000 25000 conform-action transmit
    > > exceed-action drop
    > > rate-limit output 1024000 25000 25000 conform-action transmit
    > > exceed-action drop
    > > ip summary-address eigrp x 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 5
    > > no ip mroute-cache
    > > ntp broadcast
    > > no cdp enable
    > >
    > > Can someone please explain how the rate limits work?
    > >
    > > Many thanks
    > >
     
    c1tc, Apr 21, 2005
    #3
  4. c1tc

    John Smith Guest

    > Also will the Bandwidth command have any effect on the traffic allowed
    > through the interface?


    No. But it does affect metrics under OSPF which might make the route more
    or less desirable.
     
    John Smith, Apr 21, 2005
    #4
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