Rapid Prototyping vs The Herd Mentality

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jan 16, 2010.

  1. <http://blogs.zdnet.com/Murphy/?p=1757>:

    The striking thing about the exercise was that an easy majority have
    moved the database for this to MySQL on Linux with holdouts on Solaris
    (mostly also MySQL), HP-UX, and various Microsoft configurations - but
    the unexpected thing was that none of the Unix people had any difficulty
    either understanding it or doing it; while the Wintel people equally
    unanimously wanted meetings, paperwork, “a better understanding of the
    requirementsâ€, and in something like three out of four cases additional
    monies from their bosses before they could see about getting it done.

    The Unix/Linux environment encourages experimentation and the quick throwing
    together of informal, yet quite functional solutions. Contrast this with the
    Java/Dotnet mentality, where a rigid class hierarchy reflects equally rigid
    management structures, and decisions have to be approved in a top-down
    manner, otherwise things simply cannot proceed.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jan 16, 2010
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 00:53:18 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > The Unix/Linux environment encourages experimentation and the quick
    > throwing together of informal, yet quite functional solutions. Contrast
    > this with the Java/Dotnet mentality, where a rigid class hierarchy
    > reflects equally rigid management structures, and decisions have to be
    > approved in a top-down manner, otherwise things simply cannot proceed.


    In an enterprise environment it is expected that any alteration to a server, or to an application or
    database hosted on a server, should be approved by the owner of that resource before that alteration is
    implemented.

    You seem unaware of this requirement.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Sweetpea, Jan 16, 2010
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Enkidu Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > <http://blogs.zdnet.com/Murphy/?p=1757>:
    >
    > The striking thing about the exercise was that an easy majority have
    > moved the database for this to MySQL on Linux with holdouts on
    > Solaris (mostly also MySQL), HP-UX, and various Microsoft
    > configurations - but the unexpected thing was that none of the Unix
    > people had any difficulty either understanding it or doing it; while
    > the Wintel people equally unanimously wanted meetings, paperwork, “a
    > better understanding of the requirementsâ€, and in something like
    > three out of four cases additional monies from their bosses before
    > they could see about getting it done.
    >
    > The Unix/Linux environment encourages experimentation and the quick
    > throwing together of informal, yet quite functional solutions.
    >

    This is the wrong way of doing things. "quick throwing together of
    informal, yet quite functional solutions", is not the way to develop
    stable maintainable systems.
    >
    > Contrast this with the Java/Dotnet mentality, where a rigid class
    > hierarchy reflects equally rigid management structures, and decisions
    > have to be approved in a top-down manner, otherwise things simply
    > cannot proceed.
    >

    This is the way that things should be done. Like it or not, if you are
    going to do professional development of programs and suites which work
    together well, have few bugs, need less maintenance and have been
    properly checked and tested this is the way that you must do things.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Jan 16, 2010
    #3
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Enkidu Guest

    Sweetpea wrote:
    > On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 00:53:18 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> The Unix/Linux environment encourages experimentation and the quick
    >> throwing together of informal, yet quite functional solutions.
    >> Contrast this with the Java/Dotnet mentality, where a rigid class
    >> hierarchy reflects equally rigid management structures, and
    >> decisions have to be approved in a top-down manner, otherwise
    >> things simply cannot proceed.

    >
    > In an enterprise environment it is expected that any alteration to a
    > server, or to an application or database hosted on a server, should
    > be approved by the owner of that resource before that alteration is
    > implemented.
    >
    > You seem unaware of this requirement.
    >

    OMG Lennier, I agree with you.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Jan 16, 2010
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 11:37:42 +1300, Enkidu wrote:

    > Sweetpea wrote:
    >> On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 00:53:18 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>
    >>> The Unix/Linux environment encourages experimentation and the quick
    >>> throwing together of informal, yet quite functional solutions.
    >>> Contrast this with the Java/Dotnet mentality, where a rigid class
    >>> hierarchy reflects equally rigid management structures, and decisions
    >>> have to be approved in a top-down manner, otherwise things simply
    >>> cannot proceed.

    >>
    >> In an enterprise environment it is expected that any alteration to a
    >> server, or to an application or database hosted on a server, should be
    >> approved by the owner of that resource before that alteration is
    >> implemented.
    >>
    >> You seem unaware of this requirement.

    >
    > OMG Lennier, I agree with you.


    This is pretty basic ITIL stuff.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Sweetpea, Jan 16, 2010
    #5
  6. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    John Little Guest

    On Jan 17, 11:33 am, Enkidu <> wrote:
    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:


    > > ... experimentation and the quick
    > > throwing together of informal, yet quite functional solutions.

    >
    > This is the wrong way of doing things. "quick throwing together of
    > informal, yet quite functional solutions", is not the way to develop
    > stable maintainable systems.


    You're ignoring the business risk of the top-down approach, which is a
    third total failure (defined as not reaching implementation), and a
    third unsatisfactory (implemented, but doesn't achieve goals, or is
    too late or too much over budget).

    Broadly, first, rapid prototype to a functional level. Then, do the
    "proper" checking and testing.

    Regards, John
     
    John Little, Jan 17, 2010
    #6
  7. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Gordon Guest

    On 2010-01-17, John Little <> wrote:
    > On Jan 17, 11:33 am, Enkidu <> wrote:
    >> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    >
    >> > ... experimentation and the quick
    >> > throwing together of informal, yet quite functional solutions.

    >>
    >> This is the wrong way of doing things. "quick throwing together of
    >> informal, yet quite functional solutions", is not the way to develop
    >> stable maintainable systems.

    >
    > You're ignoring the business risk of the top-down approach, which is a
    > third total failure (defined as not reaching implementation), and a
    > third unsatisfactory (implemented, but doesn't achieve goals, or is
    > too late or too much over budget).
    >
    > Broadly, first, rapid prototype to a functional level. Then, do the
    > "proper" checking and testing.
    >

    Yep build a prototype
     
    Gordon, Jan 18, 2010
    #7
  8. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Enkidu Guest

    Gordon wrote:
    > On 2010-01-17, John Little <> wrote:
    >> On Jan 17, 11:33 am, Enkidu <> wrote:
    >>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>> ... experimentation and the quick
    >>>> throwing together of informal, yet quite functional solutions.
    >>> This is the wrong way of doing things. "quick throwing together of
    >>> informal, yet quite functional solutions", is not the way to develop
    >>> stable maintainable systems.

    >> You're ignoring the business risk of the top-down approach, which is a
    >> third total failure (defined as not reaching implementation), and a
    >> third unsatisfactory (implemented, but doesn't achieve goals, or is
    >> too late or too much over budget).
    >>
    >> Broadly, first, rapid prototype to a functional level. Then, do the
    >> "proper" checking and testing.
    >>

    > Yep build a prototype
    >

    In my experience the 'prototype' almost always becomes the production
    system. The thinking is that there is something which works and the
    extra time and effort necessary to redo all the work that has already
    been done is often a sufficient stumbling block to prevent the
    'prototype' from being redone properly.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Jan 18, 2010
    #8
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