qyestion on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files.....

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ~^ beancounter ~^, Oct 19, 2007.

  1. I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    doing this? I see a varaity of options and prices for
    converters and services that do this type of work...What
    are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?

    Thanx !!!!
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Oct 19, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote:
    >I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    > doing this?


    IMHO, the best would be the Nikon Coolscan 5000, with the Nikon Coolscan V a
    very close second. (Actually, the cheaper "V" is perfectly adequate unless
    you need the features of the "5000".)

    > I see a varaity of options and prices for
    > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?


    It's hard work and takes a lot of skill. There's a learning curve. I found
    it fun and worth the effort. YMMV, as they say.

    Also, it depends on how good your slides are, and what you want. If your
    slides are very good and you'd like to make 11x14s or 12x18" prints from the
    better ones, the Nikon scanners are the right idea.

    If you just have family snaps and only want 4x6" prints, then any of the
    Epson 4800 ppi scanners that does slides will be fine.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Oct 19, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files.....

    thank you David....





    On Oct 19, 8:03 am, "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote:
    > "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote:
    >
    > >I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    > > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    > > doing this?

    >
    > IMHO, the best would be the Nikon Coolscan 5000, with the Nikon Coolscan V a
    > very close second. (Actually, the cheaper "V" is perfectly adequate unless
    > you need the features of the "5000".)
    >
    > > I see a varaity of options and prices for
    > > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    > > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?

    >
    > It's hard work and takes a lot of skill. There's a learning curve. I found
    > it fun and worth the effort. YMMV, as they say.
    >
    > Also, it depends on how good your slides are, and what you want. If your
    > slides are very good and you'd like to make 11x14s or 12x18" prints from the
    > better ones, the Nikon scanners are the right idea.
    >
    > If you just have family snaps and only want 4x6" prints, then any of the
    > Epson 4800 ppi scanners that does slides will be fine.
    >
    > David J. Littleboy
    > Tokyo, Japan
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Oct 19, 2007
    #3
  4. Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files.....

    David...aprox what is the $ investment in equipment...And, at what
    point does it make since to buy the gear vs. have someone do
    the conversion for me?...thanx......



    On Oct 19, 8:06 am, ~^ beancounter ~^ <> wrote:
    > thank you David....
    >
    > On Oct 19, 8:03 am, "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote:

    >
    > > >I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    > > > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    > > > doing this?

    >
    > > IMHO, the best would be the Nikon Coolscan 5000, with the Nikon Coolscan V a
    > > very close second. (Actually, the cheaper "V" is perfectly adequate unless
    > > you need the features of the "5000".)

    >
    > > > I see a varaity of options and prices for
    > > > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    > > > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?

    >
    > > It's hard work and takes a lot of skill. There's a learning curve. I found
    > > it fun and worth the effort. YMMV, as they say.

    >
    > > Also, it depends on how good your slides are, and what you want. If your
    > > slides are very good and you'd like to make 11x14s or 12x18" prints from the
    > > better ones, the Nikon scanners are the right idea.

    >
    > > If you just have family snaps and only want 4x6" prints, then any of the
    > > Epson 4800 ppi scanners that does slides will be fine.

    >
    > > David J. Littleboy
    > > Tokyo, Japan- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > - Show quoted text -
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Oct 19, 2007
    #4
  5. ~^ beancounter ~^

    gerrit Guest

    Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files.....

    "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > David...aprox what is the $ investment in equipment...And, at what
    > point does it make since to buy the gear vs. have someone do
    > the conversion for me?...thanx......
    >
    >
    >

    Check out ebay.
    Then when you are finished sell again on ebay.
    Getting someone else to do it is expensive and you learn nothing from the
    exercise.
    Gerrit
     
    gerrit, Oct 19, 2007
    #5
  6. Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files.....

    "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote:

    > David...aprox what is the $ investment in equipment...And, at what
    > point does it make since to buy the gear vs. have someone do
    > the conversion for me?...thanx......


    You'll have to check prices in your area. Pro scanning here is insanely
    expensive.

    First, check out http://www.scantips.com/

    What I did (and recommend) is starting out on a cheap Epson flatbed. Make
    sure it has ICE, and is 4800 ppi. The Epson scanners are _much_ worse than
    their specs would have one believe. 4800ppi isn't much over 1800 ppi, but
    it's enough to get an idea of what's going on. And make at least decent
    5x7s.

    After you have an idea of the limitations, have a couple of your sharpest
    slides scanned by a local pro shop. Then decide if you want to spend the
    money on a Nikon scanner.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Oct 19, 2007
    #6
  7. ~^ beancounter ~^

    ray Guest

    On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 06:42:05 -0700, ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote:

    > I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    > doing this? I see a varaity of options and prices for
    > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?
    >
    > Thanx !!!!


    Doing them yourself will be very time consuming with any affordable
    hardware. How many slides and how much time do you have?
     
    ray, Oct 19, 2007
    #7
  8. ~^ beancounter ~^

    Marty Fremen Guest

    Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files.....

    "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote:
    > The Epson scanners are _much_ worse than
    > their specs would have one believe.


    How do flatbeds compare to older film scanners>? I have an original Minolta
    Dimage Scan Dual that does 30 bit 2400ppi scans, no ICE, I've made nice A3
    size enlargements from scans of well-exposed slides but the lack of ICE and
    the need to set up each slide individually is a pain, so I was wondering
    whether batch scanning with a flatbed might be a viable alternative. I'm
    not sure what the DMax of the Dimage is, but IIRC a review claimed it was
    2.9 or 3 (the documentation doesn't say).
     
    Marty Fremen, Oct 19, 2007
    #8
  9. Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files.....

    cool...thanx for the info...so, the "ppi" count is the
    quality I will be able to reach once I start to make prints
    from jpeg's, ea?......Is this the measuremant I should
    focus on while shopping for hardware or someone to
    do this project for me?....thanx !!


    On Oct 19, 8:21 am, "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote:
    > "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote:
    >
    > > David...aprox what is the $ investment in equipment...And, at what
    > > point does it make since to buy the gear vs. have someone do
    > > the conversion for me?...thanx......

    >
    > You'll have to check prices in your area. Pro scanning here is insanely
    > expensive.
    >
    > First, check outhttp://www.scantips.com/
    >
    > What I did (and recommend) is starting out on a cheap Epson flatbed. Make
    > sure it has ICE, and is 4800 ppi. The Epson scanners are _much_ worse than
    > their specs would have one believe. 4800ppi isn't much over 1800 ppi, but
    > it's enough to get an idea of what's going on. And make at least decent
    > 5x7s.
    >
    > After you have an idea of the limitations, have a couple of your sharpest
    > slides scanned by a local pro shop. Then decide if you want to spend the
    > money on a Nikon scanner.
    >
    > David J. Littleboy
    > Tokyo, Japan
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Oct 19, 2007
    #9
  10. ~^ beancounter ~^

    Allen Guest

    ray wrote:
    > On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 06:42:05 -0700, ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote:
    >
    >> I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    >> converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    >> doing this? I see a varaity of options and prices for
    >> converters and services that do this type of work...What
    >> are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?
    >>
    >> Thanx !!!!

    >
    > Doing them yourself will be very time consuming with any affordable
    > hardware. How many slides and how much time do you have?
    >

    Been there, done that, and you are absolutely right, ray. ASs I'm
    retired, I had the time, but it still took several months to cukk=, scan
    and clean up a few thousand slides. Not something you do when you come
    home from in an evening, or over a weekend, or over a normal vacation
    period.
    Allen
     
    Allen, Oct 19, 2007
    #10
  11. ~^ beancounter ~^

    Allen Guest

    ray wrote:
    I should have added in my reply in support of ray that the farther I got
    into my project, the higher my standards became as to what I would scan
    vs what I discarded.
    Allen
     
    Allen, Oct 19, 2007
    #11
  12. " Doing them yourself will be very time consuming with any affordable
    hardware. How many slides and how much time do you have? "


    I have aprox 500 slides.....no real time limit....i guess...i saw
    someone
    state it took 30 min per slide on a nikon scanner to do a high quality
    scan....that seems a bit long.....







    On Oct 19, 9:28 am, ray <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 06:42:05 -0700, ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote:
    > > I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    > > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    > > doing this? I see a varaity of options and prices for
    > > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    > > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?

    >
    > > Thanx !!!!

    >
    > Doing them yourself will be very time consuming with any affordable
    > hardware. How many slides and how much time do you have?
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Oct 19, 2007
    #12
  13. ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote:

    > I have aprox 500 slides.....no real time limit....i guess...i saw
    > someone
    > state it took 30 min per slide on a nikon scanner to do a high quality
    > scan....that seems a bit long.....
    >



    Not at all! The scanner alone can;t do it ... you have to manually
    fix some things. I recommend a trip to a carpal tunnel specialist
    before deciding to embark on this project: just the Photoshop
    Band-Aid tool alone will have you needing medical care.

    Doug McDonald
     
    Doug McDonald, Oct 19, 2007
    #13
  14. ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote:
    > I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    > doing this? I see a varaity of options and prices for
    > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?
    >
    > Thanx !!!!
    >


    How good do you want them to be? That is, what's their intended use? If
    they are to be permanent archives for your slides and you plan to throw
    away the slides, a dedicated sanner is the way to go. You want to get
    everything off of them.

    However, if you want to project them with a computer-based system, or
    make enlargements up to 8x10, there is another way to. Use a digital
    camera to take pictures of them. I have an 8 mp camera and one of those
    slide copying units I bought on EBay for about $60. I don't get every
    last microspcopic detail, but I get close to it, and I can easily do 4-5
    slides a minute. If grainy film was used for the slides, it will show up
    un the copy. Enlargements up to 8x10 look extremely good. I keep the
    slides, so if I ever need a very high quality copy of a particular
    slide, I can have it scanned professionally. So far I haven't. You do
    have to clean your slides if they are dirty, while some slide scanners
    do automatic dust and scratch removal.

    So you have to think about your end use. Just something to think about.

    Joe
     
    Joseph Miller, Oct 19, 2007
    #14
  15. ~^ beancounter ~^

    TrevM Guest

    Have a look at this - http://www.scanace.com/en/product/1800u.php

    A nice little scanner that produces excellent results from slides or
    negatives in a reasonable time - mine cost about £100 a few years back.


    "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >" Doing them yourself will be very time consuming with any affordable
    > hardware. How many slides and how much time do you have? "
    >
    >
    > I have aprox 500 slides.....no real time limit....i guess...i saw
    > someone
    > state it took 30 min per slide on a nikon scanner to do a high quality
    > scan....that seems a bit long.....
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > On Oct 19, 9:28 am, ray <> wrote:
    >> On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 06:42:05 -0700, ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote:
    >> > I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    >> > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    >> > doing this? I see a varaity of options and prices for
    >> > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    >> > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?

    >>
    >> > Thanx !!!!

    >>
    >> Doing them yourself will be very time consuming with any affordable
    >> hardware. How many slides and how much time do you have?

    >
    >
     
    TrevM, Oct 19, 2007
    #15
  16. Yea Joe...Right On...I just sat down to the computer to ask the group
    about the "funny thingy" I saw on eBay that acted like a holder
    on the end of a lense...and I could just copy w/a 35mm
    digital camera....

    " I have an 8 mp camera and one of those
    slide copying units I bought on EBay for about $60"

    So, the quality is ok, I mean for the $$?...I wouldn't expect
    near the results I would get out of a $1,000 piece of nikon
    gear...But would you say you get more than 10% of the
    quality result?.....It sounds more like 60-80%, no?

    thanx !!!

    btw: what would I search for to see these on eBay?






    On Oct 19, 4:00 pm, Joseph Miller <> wrote:
    > ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote:
    > > I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    > > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    > > doing this? I see a varaity of options and prices for
    > > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    > > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?

    >
    > > Thanx !!!!

    >
    > How good do you want them to be? That is, what's their intended use? If
    > they are to be permanent archives for your slides and you plan to throw
    > away the slides, a dedicated sanner is the way to go. You want to get
    > everything off of them.
    >
    > However, if you want to project them with a computer-based system, or
    > make enlargements up to 8x10, there is another way to. Use a digital
    > camera to take pictures of them. I have an 8 mp camera and one of those
    > slide copying units I bought on EBay for about $60. I don't get every
    > last microspcopic detail, but I get close to it, and I can easily do 4-5
    > slides a minute. If grainy film was used for the slides, it will show up
    > un the copy. Enlargements up to 8x10 look extremely good. I keep the
    > slides, so if I ever need a very high quality copy of a particular
    > slide, I can have it scanned professionally. So far I haven't. You do
    > have to clean your slides if they are dirty, while some slide scanners
    > do automatic dust and scratch removal.
    >
    > So you have to think about your end use. Just something to think about.
    >
    > Joe
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Oct 19, 2007
    #16
  17. ~^ beancounter ~^

    Allen Guest

    ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote:
    > " Doing them yourself will be very time consuming with any affordable
    > hardware. How many slides and how much time do you have? "
    >
    >
    > I have aprox 500 slides.....no real time limit....i guess...i saw
    > someone
    > state it took 30 min per slide on a nikon scanner to do a high quality
    > scan....that seems a bit long.....
    >

    <snip>
    It's not the actual scanning time, which is rather inconsequential. It's
    all the pre-processing (cleaning slides, perhaps remounting in some
    cases) and post-processing (color correction, cropping, etc) that is
    required for good results.

    I started with an accumulation going from 1946 to the mid-1980s (when I
    switched mostly to print film). This period included many old family
    photos from before I married, and then marriage and two children; it
    also included many pictures of flowers, birds, etc resulting from many
    hikes when I would shoot 3 or 4 36-exposure rolls and come home and
    process them the same day. I have no idea how many I had, but I'm sure
    it was at least 7,000. As I stated in another post, as the projet went
    on I raised my standards as to what I should scan. I just checked the
    directory where they are stored: 4,713 image files. Whew!

    I scanned these on a Canon flatbed. I could have taken them to a local
    service that does good work and would have charged about $2.00 per slide.

    Allen
     
    Allen, Oct 20, 2007
    #17
  18. ~^ beancounter ~^

    Jim Guest

    Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files.....

    "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > David...aprox what is the $ investment in equipment...And, at what
    > point does it make since to buy the gear vs. have someone do
    > the conversion for me?...thanx......

    I decided that something had to change after I had spent more than enough to
    make a good downpayment on a scanner.
    The incremental cost is that of a scanner. Regardless of who does the
    scanning, you will need a photo editing program.
    I got pretty good at the scanning after the first few hundred slides. I
    have scanned more that 2000 slides and more than 3000 color negatives...
    Another thing to consider is that over time both slides and negatives lose
    quality. If, like me, you have a number of E2 and E4 slides, you will
    need to do the scanning yourself. If, like me, you have alot of color
    negatives made in the 70s and 80s, you will need to do the scanning
    yourself.
    Current emulsions seem much more stable.
    Jim
    >
    >
    >
    > On Oct 19, 8:06 am, ~^ beancounter ~^ <> wrote:
    >> thank you David....
    >>
    >> On Oct 19, 8:03 am, "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > "~^ beancounter ~^" <> wrote:

    >>
    >> > >I have a collection of old 35mm slides that I want to start
    >> > > converting to digital jpeg files...What's my best bet on
    >> > > doing this?

    >>
    >> > IMHO, the best would be the Nikon Coolscan 5000, with the Nikon
    >> > Coolscan V a
    >> > very close second. (Actually, the cheaper "V" is perfectly adequate
    >> > unless
    >> > you need the features of the "5000".)

    >>
    >> > > I see a varaity of options and prices for
    >> > > converters and services that do this type of work...What
    >> > > are the opinions and ideas out there on price and quality?

    >>
    >> > It's hard work and takes a lot of skill. There's a learning curve. I
    >> > found
    >> > it fun and worth the effort. YMMV, as they say.

    >>
    >> > Also, it depends on how good your slides are, and what you want. If
    >> > your
    >> > slides are very good and you'd like to make 11x14s or 12x18" prints
    >> > from the
    >> > better ones, the Nikon scanners are the right idea.

    >>
    >> > If you just have family snaps and only want 4x6" prints, then any of
    >> > the
    >> > Epson 4800 ppi scanners that does slides will be fine.

    >>
    >> > David J. Littleboy
    >> > Tokyo, Japan- Hide quoted text -

    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    >
     
    Jim, Oct 22, 2007
    #18
  19. Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files....."nikon bellows system"??

    Hey there everyone....anyone ever use a "Nikon Bellows System w/slide
    copying adapter
    mod. II" ? It is external gear/lense/adaptor that looks like it fits
    most Nikon 35mm's
    .......what level of quality might i expect when using it off of a
    Nikon d200?

    thanx.....



    >
    > I decided that something had to change after I had spent more than enough to
    > make a good downpayment on a scanner.
    > The incremental cost is that of a scanner. Regardless of who does the
    > scanning, you will need a photo editing program.
    > I got pretty good at the scanning after the first few hundred slides. I
    > have scanned more that 2000 slides and more than 3000 color negatives...
    > Another thing to consider is that over time both slides and negatives lose
    > quality. If, like me, you have a number of E2 and E4 slides, you will
    > need to do the scanning yourself. If, like me, you have alot of color
    > negatives made in the 70s and 80s, you will need to do the scanning
    > yourself.
    > Current emulsions seem much more stable.
    > Jim
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Oct 30, 2007
    #19
  20. ~^ beancounter ~^

    Peter Irwin Guest

    Re: question on converting old 35mm slides to jpeg files....."nikon bellows system"??

    ~^ beancounter ~^ <> wrote:
    > Hey there everyone....anyone ever use a "Nikon Bellows System w/slide
    > copying adapter
    > mod. II" ? It is external gear/lense/adaptor that looks like it fits
    > most Nikon 35mm's
    > ......what level of quality might i expect when using it off of a
    > Nikon d200?


    I don't know the Nikon unit specifically, but most camera
    makers had something similar. It is a bellows for macro
    work plus a second bellows which goes in front of the
    lens and holds the slide.

    What quality you get will depend on what lens you choose
    to use with it. A good choice would be a reverse mounted
    enlarging lens. A 50mm f/2.8 EL-Nikkor would be a very good
    one for the purpose. You want it mounted backwards because
    the slide is larger than your digital sensor. Nikon makes
    reversing rings for the purpose. You will also probably
    need a step up filter ring. A Nikon reversing ring will
    probably have a 52mm filter, while the EL-Nikkor enlarging
    lens has a 40.5mm filter ring.

    Peter.
    --
     
    Peter Irwin, Oct 30, 2007
    #20
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