Question: Artificially aging digital photos

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by BD, Jul 11, 2005.

  1. BD

    BD Guest

    Hi, all.

    I've been asked to do some pictures in the "1930's pin-up girl" genre.

    My first instinct would be to limit my alterations to stripping out
    color info, but I think it would be neat to move into sepia, and try to
    make the final image look aged and weathered. Cracks, small tears, this
    kind of thing.

    There are also some more 'subtle' effects with the lighting and grain
    that seem to give an image that aged look. I can't verbalize this level
    of effect terribly well, so I don't really know how I'd accomplish it.

    What I'd likely do is take the images in full color, use Photoshop to
    strip out the color info and to do all the post, and go from there.

    I'm wondering if anyone has seen any tips/tricks articles on using the
    stock filter set for Photoshop CS for making these effects.

    Or, is there perhaps some brilliant 3rd-party filter set which would do
    the job??

    Thanks!!

    BD
    BD, Jul 11, 2005
    #1
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  2. BD

    skroob Guest

    http://www.silveroxide.com/

    may be of use to you. i use their filter a lot.


    "BD" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, all.
    >
    > I've been asked to do some pictures in the "1930's pin-up girl" genre.
    >
    > My first instinct would be to limit my alterations to stripping out
    > color info, but I think it would be neat to move into sepia, and try to
    > make the final image look aged and weathered. Cracks, small tears, this
    > kind of thing.
    >
    > There are also some more 'subtle' effects with the lighting and grain
    > that seem to give an image that aged look. I can't verbalize this level
    > of effect terribly well, so I don't really know how I'd accomplish it.
    >
    > What I'd likely do is take the images in full color, use Photoshop to
    > strip out the color info and to do all the post, and go from there.
    >
    > I'm wondering if anyone has seen any tips/tricks articles on using the
    > stock filter set for Photoshop CS for making these effects.
    >
    > Or, is there perhaps some brilliant 3rd-party filter set which would do
    > the job??
    >
    > Thanks!!
    >
    > BD
    >
    skroob, Jul 11, 2005
    #2
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  3. BD

    BD Guest

    Thanks!

    it occurs to me that one of the PS groups would have been a better
    place to stick my question, but oh well. ;-)

    I'll check out that filter. Thanks!
    BD, Jul 11, 2005
    #3
  4. BD

    Don Stauffer Guest

    BD wrote:
    > Hi, all.
    >
    > I've been asked to do some pictures in the "1930's pin-up girl" genre.
    >
    > My first instinct would be to limit my alterations to stripping out
    > color info, but I think it would be neat to move into sepia, and try to
    > make the final image look aged and weathered. Cracks, small tears, this
    > kind of thing.
    >
    > There are also some more 'subtle' effects with the lighting and grain
    > that seem to give an image that aged look. I can't verbalize this level
    > of effect terribly well, so I don't really know how I'd accomplish it.
    >
    > What I'd likely do is take the images in full color, use Photoshop to
    > strip out the color info and to do all the post, and go from there.
    >
    > I'm wondering if anyone has seen any tips/tricks articles on using the
    > stock filter set for Photoshop CS for making these effects.
    >
    > Or, is there perhaps some brilliant 3rd-party filter set which would do
    > the job??
    >
    > Thanks!!
    >
    > BD
    >

    I "age" pictures by reducing saturation, using some equalization, and
    possibly shifting just a tiny bit to the reddish direction.
    Don Stauffer, Jul 12, 2005
    #4
  5. BD

    BD Guest

    Yes, that's likely similar to the process I'd use - but I was hoping to
    go a little further, introducing some cracks and perhaps some roughness
    around the edges, to really make it look beat up. I know there are
    built-in plugins that might to something like that.
    BD, Jul 12, 2005
    #5
  6. BD

    Don Stauffer Guest

    BD wrote:
    > Yes, that's likely similar to the process I'd use - but I was hoping to
    > go a little further, introducing some cracks and perhaps some roughness
    > around the edges, to really make it look beat up. I know there are
    > built-in plugins that might to something like that.
    >



    Yes, several editors have a "torn edge" frame. Personally I do not like
    cracks and chips in emulsion- these are what I take out when I do
    restore an authentic old photo, and I just have an aversion to actually
    adding them myself :-(
    Don Stauffer, Jul 13, 2005
    #6
  7. BD

    male1960 Guest

    BD wrote:
    > Hi, all.
    >
    > I've been asked to do some pictures in the "1930's pin-up girl" genre.
    >
    > My first instinct would be to limit my alterations to stripping out
    > color info, but I think it would be neat to move into sepia, and try to
    > make the final image look aged and weathered. Cracks, small tears, this
    > kind of thing.
    >
    > There are also some more 'subtle' effects with the lighting and grain
    > that seem to give an image that aged look. I can't verbalize this level
    > of effect terribly well, so I don't really know how I'd accomplish it.
    >
    > What I'd likely do is take the images in full color, use Photoshop to
    > strip out the color info and to do all the post, and go from there.
    >
    > I'm wondering if anyone has seen any tips/tricks articles on using the
    > stock filter set for Photoshop CS for making these effects.
    >
    > Or, is there perhaps some brilliant 3rd-party filter set which would do
    > the job??
    >
    > Thanks!!
    >
    > BD
    >

    There is a program I just found called 'Filters Unlimited' that has an
    additional "Photo Aging Kit" available to it. The program works as a
    Photoshop Plug-in, and the aging kit requires that you already have the
    main program installed. The main program costs $, but you can also try
    a demo version (not yet sure if the aging kit works with the demo
    version - - I just found this and haven't tried it yet).

    Not sure if you want to pay for this, but it's one option. Here's the
    URL to the Aging Kit page, where some resulting photos are shown:

    http://www.icnet.de/photo_aging_kit/index.html

    You can navigate from there back to the main program's details and etc.

    = = = = = = = = = =

    Also, here are a couple websites with Plug-Ins that you could explore:

    http://www.photoshopbrushes.com/brushes/1.htm
    (this page has brush plug-ins (free) with which you can add "cracks" and
    dirt to photos. I've used this, and it's ok.. (I just never gave myself
    the time to master it).

    http://hem.passagen.se/grafoman/plugtool/plugs.html

    If you find something else that works, lemme know. I love the old look
    too!

    Cheers!

    [remove the two EE in my email domain]
    male1960, Jul 13, 2005
    #7
  8. BD

    Frank ess Guest

    male1960 wrote:
    > BD wrote:
    >> Hi, all.
    >>
    >> I've been asked to do some pictures in the "1930's pin-up girl"
    >> genre. My first instinct would be to limit my alterations to
    >> stripping out
    >> color info, but I think it would be neat to move into sepia, and
    >> try
    >> to make the final image look aged and weathered. Cracks, small
    >> tears, this kind of thing.
    >>
    >> There are also some more 'subtle' effects with the lighting and
    >> grain
    >> that seem to give an image that aged look. I can't verbalize this
    >> level of effect terribly well, so I don't really know how I'd
    >> accomplish it. What I'd likely do is take the images in full color,
    >> use Photoshop to
    >> strip out the color info and to do all the post, and go from there.
    >>
    >> I'm wondering if anyone has seen any tips/tricks articles on using
    >> the stock filter set for Photoshop CS for making these effects.
    >>
    >> Or, is there perhaps some brilliant 3rd-party filter set which
    >> would
    >> do the job??
    >>
    >> Thanks!!
    >>
    >> BD
    >>

    > There is a program I just found called 'Filters Unlimited' that has
    > an
    > additional "Photo Aging Kit" available to it. The program works as
    > a
    > Photoshop Plug-in, and the aging kit requires that you already have
    > the main program installed. The main program costs $, but you can
    > also try a demo version (not yet sure if the aging kit works with
    > the
    > demo version - - I just found this and haven't tried it yet).
    >
    > Not sure if you want to pay for this, but it's one option. Here's
    > the
    > URL to the Aging Kit page, where some resulting photos are shown:
    >
    > http://www.icnet.de/photo_aging_kit/index.html
    >
    > You can navigate from there back to the main program's details and
    > etc.
    > = = = = = = = = = =
    >
    > Also, here are a couple websites with Plug-Ins that you could
    > explore:
    >
    > http://www.photoshopbrushes.com/brushes/1.htm
    > (this page has brush plug-ins (free) with which you can add "cracks"
    > and dirt to photos. I've used this, and it's ok.. (I just never
    > gave
    > myself the time to master it).
    >
    > http://hem.passagen.se/grafoman/plugtool/plugs.html
    >
    > If you find something else that works, lemme know. I love the old
    > look too!
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > [remove the two EE in my email domain]


    Here's one that may make your labors easier:
    http://mediachance.com/digicam/bworks.htm

    Does anyone remember the tale about the rich Texan visiting England?
    He was a little put-off by what he thought was a snooty attitude, but
    that didn't keep him from looking for ways to impress his friends back
    home. He visited an estate whose lawn was billiard-table smooth and
    lush. He asked his host how he could make the lawn at his Texas ranch
    like that. The host called the gardener, who explained the type of
    grass to plant, the type and amounts nutrients and water to be
    applied, and how often. The Texan said he could do that, Anything else
    he should do? "Yes, roll it for four hundred years".


    --
    Frank ess
    Frank ess, Jul 13, 2005
    #8
  9. BD

    male1960 Guest

    male1960, Jul 15, 2005
    #9
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