question about Routing.

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by news.stadseiland.nl, Jan 24, 2005.

  1. Hello All,

    The problem is as follow. I have 2 networks at the moment completely
    seperate. Both are connected to the internet through DSL. The DSL lines are
    connected to 2 seperate providers. Now what I want to do is a sort of
    redundancy build in.

    When one of the routers connected to the internet fails I want a router, or
    firewall installed between the both networks, and rerouting the internetload
    to the other network. The router in between must do DHCP for both networks.
    I'm thinking on a ethernet router, but what could the routing configuration
    be. I was thinking about adding routes bases on source address, but is that
    possible in the Cisco IOS?

    The problem is when I set the following rules

    ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.0.1.1 (the first network)
    ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.0.2.1 (the second network)

    This should work for the first network. Because I want this setup on the
    second network as wel. (and when posible not using 2 routers)
    What kind of configuration is necessary.

    I hope someone can help me out.
     
    news.stadseiland.nl, Jan 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. news.stadseiland.nl

    Ben Guest

    You don't need a third router, just use HSRP (hot standby routing
    protocol). Your default gateway becomes a virtual ip address and traffic
    is handled by whichever you make the active standby router.

    DHCP is another issue, you can solve this in many ways - why not run it
    on a unix box?


    news.stadseiland.nl wrote:
    > Hello All,
    >
    > The problem is as follow. I have 2 networks at the moment completely
    > seperate. Both are connected to the internet through DSL. The DSL lines are
    > connected to 2 seperate providers. Now what I want to do is a sort of
    > redundancy build in.
    >
    > When one of the routers connected to the internet fails I want a router, or
    > firewall installed between the both networks, and rerouting the internetload
    > to the other network. The router in between must do DHCP for both networks.
    > I'm thinking on a ethernet router, but what could the routing configuration
    > be. I was thinking about adding routes bases on source address, but is that
    > possible in the Cisco IOS?
    >
    > The problem is when I set the following rules
    >
    > ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.0.1.1 (the first network)
    > ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.0.2.1 (the second network)
    >
    > This should work for the first network. Because I want this setup on the
    > second network as wel. (and when posible not using 2 routers)
    > What kind of configuration is necessary.
    >
    > I hope someone can help me out.
    >
    >
     
    Ben, Jan 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. news.stadseiland.nl

    Hansang Bae Guest

    Ben wrote:

    > You don't need a third router, just use HSRP (hot standby routing
    > protocol). Your default gateway becomes a virtual ip address and
    > traffic is handled by whichever you make the active standby router.
    >
    > DHCP is another issue, you can solve this in many ways - why not run
    > it on a unix box?



    That works for outgoing packets but not incoming packets. This sounds
    like it should be a simple thing to do...but in fact, it is not.



    --

    hsb


    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    **************************ROT13 MY ADDRESS*************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Jan 25, 2005
    #3
  4. news.stadseiland.nl

    Guest

    , Jan 25, 2005
    #4
  5. news.stadseiland.nl

    Ben Guest

    Hansang Bae wrote:
    > Ben wrote:
    >
    >
    >>You don't need a third router, just use HSRP (hot standby routing
    >>protocol). Your default gateway becomes a virtual ip address and
    >>traffic is handled by whichever you make the active standby router.
    >>
    >>DHCP is another issue, you can solve this in many ways - why not run
    >>it on a unix box?

    >
    >
    >
    > That works for outgoing packets but not incoming packets. This sounds
    > like it should be a simple thing to do...but in fact, it is not.
    >
    >
    >

    I took it for granted he was only trying to control outbound traffic.
     
    Ben, Jan 26, 2005
    #5
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