Question about older PIX / is the seller lying/misinforming to me?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Eric Kotz, Oct 17, 2003.

  1. Eric Kotz

    Eric Kotz Guest

    Hey all, I was the high bidder on a PIX firewall today (not on
    eBay...you have to register on the site to view closed auctions so
    it's not worth the effort of providing a link), and I've been doing
    some additional research this evening and I'm thinking I'm being
    misinformed/taken for a ride here. I'm going to admit that I know
    next to nothing about the PIX-I'm a college student who purchased it
    just to learn about it by playing with it. I don't want to make
    accusations without the opinions of someone who knows more about them.
    Here's what I know about the PIX. First he said it was an early
    version of the 535. Later on the seller said it was the 535's
    predecessor. The part number is 47-3158-0.
    From the pictures I can see the unit's in a rackmount case-it looks
    like it's 4U tall. It has a hinged door on the front and has a floppy
    drive behind it.
    The seller posted the following description
    ---START---
    The world-leading Cisco PIX 500 Series Firewalls are purpose-built
    security appliances that deliver unprecedented levels of security,
    performance and reliability. These platforms provide robust,
    enterprise-class security services including stateful inspection
    firewalling, standards-based IPsec Virtual Private Networking (VPN),
    intrusion protection and much more in cost-effecective, easy to deploy
    solutions. Ranging from compact, plug-n-play desktop firewalls for
    small/home offices to carrier class gigabit firewalls for the most
    demanding enterprise and service provider environments, The PIX
    Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections. Built upon a
    hardened, purpose-built operating system for security services, PIX
    OS, PIX Firewalls provide the highest levels of security and have
    earned many industry accolades including ICSA Firewall and IPsec
    certification as well as Common Criteria EAL4 evaluation status. PIX
    Firewalls provide a wide range of security and networking services
    including Network Address Translation (NAT), Port Address Translation
    (PAT), content filtering (Java/ActiveX), URL filtering, AAA
    (RADIUS/TACACS+) integration, support for leading X.509 PKI solutions,
    DHCP client/server, PPPoE support (coming in Q1 2002) and much more.
    PIX Firewalls also provide advanced security services for multimedia
    applications and protocols including Voice over IP (VoIP), H.323, SIP,
    Skinny and Microsoft NetMeeting, giving you the peace of mind when
    deploying next generation converged network services. Administrators
    can choose from a wide variety of solutions for remotely configuring,
    monitoring and troubleshooting PIX firewalls. These solutions range
    from an integrated, Web-based management interface (PIX Device
    Manager) to centralized, policy-based management tools to support for
    remote monitoring protocols such as Simple Network Management Protocol
    (SNMP) and syslog. Administrators can also manage PIX firewalls using
    a convenient command-line interface (CLI) through a variety of methods
    including Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH) and an out-of-band console port.
    ---END---
    Now, I've been doing some research, and the pictures look more like a
    PIX Classic/10000 (Are these the same/what's different?)
    Poking around on Cisco's site, I find that there's very little
    information (virtually none) on this unit. From what I've been able
    to scrounge from the net, it seems like this unit can only handle
    about 90 mbits/second of traffic...a far cry from the 1gbit/sec the
    add claimed. I'm just getting concerned-can this unit do at least the
    majority of the things listed in the auction, or have I been scammed?

    Thanks,
    Eric Kotz
    Eric Kotz, Oct 17, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Eric Kotz

    Richard Deal Guest

    Chrix,

    Yeah, you were taken for a ride. It might be a 520, or the older 10000. If
    he said it was a 535 in his auction, he's an outright liar. And if it's the
    10000, it won't run the latest and greatest of PIX software. I would
    recommend that you buy a new or used 501. A used 501, if you are patient,
    can be bought for about 300-350 on ebay.

    I'm curious as to what the winning bid was for this auction, if you wouldn't
    mind sharing this.

    Hope this helps!

    Cheers!
    --

    Richard A. Deal

    Visit my home page at http://home.cfl.rr.com/dealgroup/

    Author of CCNA Cisco Certified Network Associate Study Guide (Exam 640-801),
    Cisco PIX Firewalls, CCNA Secrets Revealed!, CCNP Remote Access Exam Prep,
    CCNP Switching Exam Cram, and CCNP Cisco LAN Switch Configuration Exam Cram

    Cisco Test Prep author for QuizWare, providing the most comprehensive Cisco
    exams on the market.



    "Eric Kotz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey all, I was the high bidder on a PIX firewall today (not on
    > eBay...you have to register on the site to view closed auctions so
    > it's not worth the effort of providing a link), and I've been doing
    > some additional research this evening and I'm thinking I'm being
    > misinformed/taken for a ride here. I'm going to admit that I know
    > next to nothing about the PIX-I'm a college student who purchased it
    > just to learn about it by playing with it. I don't want to make
    > accusations without the opinions of someone who knows more about them.
    > Here's what I know about the PIX. First he said it was an early
    > version of the 535. Later on the seller said it was the 535's
    > predecessor. The part number is 47-3158-0.
    > From the pictures I can see the unit's in a rackmount case-it looks
    > like it's 4U tall. It has a hinged door on the front and has a floppy
    > drive behind it.
    > The seller posted the following description
    > ---START---
    > The world-leading Cisco PIX 500 Series Firewalls are purpose-built
    > security appliances that deliver unprecedented levels of security,
    > performance and reliability. These platforms provide robust,
    > enterprise-class security services including stateful inspection
    > firewalling, standards-based IPsec Virtual Private Networking (VPN),
    > intrusion protection and much more in cost-effecective, easy to deploy
    > solutions. Ranging from compact, plug-n-play desktop firewalls for
    > small/home offices to carrier class gigabit firewalls for the most
    > demanding enterprise and service provider environments, The PIX
    > Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    > environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    > ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections. Built upon a
    > hardened, purpose-built operating system for security services, PIX
    > OS, PIX Firewalls provide the highest levels of security and have
    > earned many industry accolades including ICSA Firewall and IPsec
    > certification as well as Common Criteria EAL4 evaluation status. PIX
    > Firewalls provide a wide range of security and networking services
    > including Network Address Translation (NAT), Port Address Translation
    > (PAT), content filtering (Java/ActiveX), URL filtering, AAA
    > (RADIUS/TACACS+) integration, support for leading X.509 PKI solutions,
    > DHCP client/server, PPPoE support (coming in Q1 2002) and much more.
    > PIX Firewalls also provide advanced security services for multimedia
    > applications and protocols including Voice over IP (VoIP), H.323, SIP,
    > Skinny and Microsoft NetMeeting, giving you the peace of mind when
    > deploying next generation converged network services. Administrators
    > can choose from a wide variety of solutions for remotely configuring,
    > monitoring and troubleshooting PIX firewalls. These solutions range
    > from an integrated, Web-based management interface (PIX Device
    > Manager) to centralized, policy-based management tools to support for
    > remote monitoring protocols such as Simple Network Management Protocol
    > (SNMP) and syslog. Administrators can also manage PIX firewalls using
    > a convenient command-line interface (CLI) through a variety of methods
    > including Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH) and an out-of-band console port.
    > ---END---
    > Now, I've been doing some research, and the pictures look more like a
    > PIX Classic/10000 (Are these the same/what's different?)
    > Poking around on Cisco's site, I find that there's very little
    > information (virtually none) on this unit. From what I've been able
    > to scrounge from the net, it seems like this unit can only handle
    > about 90 mbits/second of traffic...a far cry from the 1gbit/sec the
    > add claimed. I'm just getting concerned-can this unit do at least the
    > majority of the things listed in the auction, or have I been scammed?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Eric Kotz
    >
    >
    Richard Deal, Oct 17, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. In article <>,
    Eric Kotz <> wrote:
    :Hey all, I was the high bidder on a PIX firewall today

    :I'm thinking I'm being
    :misinformed/taken for a ride here.

    :Here's what I know about the PIX. First he said it was an early
    :version of the 535. Later on the seller said it was the 535's
    :predecessor. The part number is 47-3158-0.

    Cisco doesn't use numeric part numbers for any PIX model.

    :From the pictures I can see the unit's in a rackmount case-it looks
    :like it's 4U tall. It has a hinged door on the front and has a floppy
    :drive behind it.

    That's an original PIX, now known as the "PIX Firewall Classic".
    Look carefully at the installation diagrams in this reference,
    and notice that only the original PIX had the swing-down door:

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products...stallation_guide_chapter09186a0080089c8a.html

    By the time of the PIX 10000, the hinged door was gone and the floppy
    migrated further to the right. By the time of the first 500 series,
    the devices were no longer as tall.


    :The seller posted the following description
    :---START---
    :The world-leading Cisco PIX 500 Series Firewalls are purpose-built
    :security appliances that deliver unprecedented levels of security,
    :performance and reliability.

    They are, but it's not a PIX 500 series!


    :The PIX
    :Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    :environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    :ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections.

    The seller is quoting current product literature representing the
    maximum capacity of the series. The 535 is the only (stand-alone)
    member of the line able to provide over 1 Gbps.


    :Administrators can also manage PIX firewalls using
    :a convenient command-line interface (CLI) through a variety of methods
    :including Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH) and an out-of-band console port.

    The first version that supported ssh was 5.2(1), which required
    16 Mb of flash and 32 Mb of RAM. As best I can gather, many of the
    PIX Classic were left somewhere around 4.2 release (more memory
    was required after 4.2(5)), and it wouldn't surprise me if the
    unit you bid on was down around 4.2(2).


    :From what I've been able
    :to scrounge from the net, it seems like this unit can only handle
    :about 90 mbits/second of traffic...a far cry from the 1gbit/sec the
    :add claimed.

    45 Mbps for the PIX Classic.


    :I'm just getting concerned-can this unit do at least the
    :majority of the things listed in the auction, or have I been scammed?


    Was there anything else in the actual ad, other than quoting the
    Cisco sales literature? Because what it sounds like at the moment
    is akin to attaching a description of a modern Porche to a sale of
    an original Volkswagen Beatle -- the description itself isn't -wrong-,
    it just doesn't apply!

    Based on the ad, you have a right to expect at least something
    in the 500 series range, the oldest of which appears to be the 515
    when I look at the technical documentation. [Odd, I had always
    thought the 510 was before the 515.] The tall unit you describe
    is not in the 500 series.
    --
    Before responding, take into account the possibility that the Universe
    was created just an instant ago, and that you have not actually read
    anything, but were instead created intact with a memory of having read it.
    Walter Roberson, Oct 17, 2003
    #3
  4. Walter Roberson, Oct 17, 2003
    #4
  5. Eric Kotz

    Eric Kotz Guest

    Thanks for your response. Here's a link to the auction, if anyone has
    a Yahoo account I think you can access it:
    http://page.auctions.shopping.yahoo.com/auction/82090734?aucview=0x70
    The auction closed for $209 plus $50 shipping. I know that's a lot
    less than a 535 would fetch on eBay-but that didn't even make me
    blink, as I've picked up stuff for 1/10 it's eBay value there (yahoo
    auctions) before (Gigabit ethernet switch for $30 for instance)
    Did I still buy the unit for a reasonable price? Are there any
    hardware upgrades that can be done to make it capable of running
    current software (I understand it's just a PC-I think a Pentium 133 in
    the unit I bought) Or did I just spend $250 on a paperweight for
    really big sheets of paper??
    Can anyone offer some insite as to how inaccurate the description
    is-is it even remotely correct, or should I be telling this guy I want
    my money back (I don't have the unit yet) Is it remotely similar to
    the 535?

    Thanks,
    Eric Kotz




    "Richard Deal" <> wrote in message news:<6_Sjb.159432$>...
    > Chrix,
    >
    > Yeah, you were taken for a ride. It might be a 520, or the older 10000. If
    > he said it was a 535 in his auction, he's an outright liar. And if it's the
    > 10000, it won't run the latest and greatest of PIX software. I would
    > recommend that you buy a new or used 501. A used 501, if you are patient,
    > can be bought for about 300-350 on ebay.
    >
    > I'm curious as to what the winning bid was for this auction, if you wouldn't
    > mind sharing this.
    >
    > Hope this helps!
    >
    > Cheers!
    > --
    >
    > Richard A. Deal
    >
    > Visit my home page at http://home.cfl.rr.com/dealgroup/
    >
    > Author of CCNA Cisco Certified Network Associate Study Guide (Exam 640-801),
    > Cisco PIX Firewalls, CCNA Secrets Revealed!, CCNP Remote Access Exam Prep,
    > CCNP Switching Exam Cram, and CCNP Cisco LAN Switch Configuration Exam Cram
    >
    > Cisco Test Prep author for QuizWare, providing the most comprehensive Cisco
    > exams on the market.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Eric Kotz" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hey all, I was the high bidder on a PIX firewall today (not on
    > > eBay...you have to register on the site to view closed auctions so
    > > it's not worth the effort of providing a link), and I've been doing
    > > some additional research this evening and I'm thinking I'm being
    > > misinformed/taken for a ride here. I'm going to admit that I know
    > > next to nothing about the PIX-I'm a college student who purchased it
    > > just to learn about it by playing with it. I don't want to make
    > > accusations without the opinions of someone who knows more about them.
    > > Here's what I know about the PIX. First he said it was an early
    > > version of the 535. Later on the seller said it was the 535's
    > > predecessor. The part number is 47-3158-0.
    > > From the pictures I can see the unit's in a rackmount case-it looks
    > > like it's 4U tall. It has a hinged door on the front and has a floppy
    > > drive behind it.
    > > The seller posted the following description
    > > ---START---
    > > The world-leading Cisco PIX 500 Series Firewalls are purpose-built
    > > security appliances that deliver unprecedented levels of security,
    > > performance and reliability. These platforms provide robust,
    > > enterprise-class security services including stateful inspection
    > > firewalling, standards-based IPsec Virtual Private Networking (VPN),
    > > intrusion protection and much more in cost-effecective, easy to deploy
    > > solutions. Ranging from compact, plug-n-play desktop firewalls for
    > > small/home offices to carrier class gigabit firewalls for the most
    > > demanding enterprise and service provider environments, The PIX
    > > Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    > > environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    > > ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections. Built upon a
    > > hardened, purpose-built operating system for security services, PIX
    > > OS, PIX Firewalls provide the highest levels of security and have
    > > earned many industry accolades including ICSA Firewall and IPsec
    > > certification as well as Common Criteria EAL4 evaluation status. PIX
    > > Firewalls provide a wide range of security and networking services
    > > including Network Address Translation (NAT), Port Address Translation
    > > (PAT), content filtering (Java/ActiveX), URL filtering, AAA
    > > (RADIUS/TACACS+) integration, support for leading X.509 PKI solutions,
    > > DHCP client/server, PPPoE support (coming in Q1 2002) and much more.
    > > PIX Firewalls also provide advanced security services for multimedia
    > > applications and protocols including Voice over IP (VoIP), H.323, SIP,
    > > Skinny and Microsoft NetMeeting, giving you the peace of mind when
    > > deploying next generation converged network services. Administrators
    > > can choose from a wide variety of solutions for remotely configuring,
    > > monitoring and troubleshooting PIX firewalls. These solutions range
    > > from an integrated, Web-based management interface (PIX Device
    > > Manager) to centralized, policy-based management tools to support for
    > > remote monitoring protocols such as Simple Network Management Protocol
    > > (SNMP) and syslog. Administrators can also manage PIX firewalls using
    > > a convenient command-line interface (CLI) through a variety of methods
    > > including Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH) and an out-of-band console port.
    > > ---END---
    > > Now, I've been doing some research, and the pictures look more like a
    > > PIX Classic/10000 (Are these the same/what's different?)
    > > Poking around on Cisco's site, I find that there's very little
    > > information (virtually none) on this unit. From what I've been able
    > > to scrounge from the net, it seems like this unit can only handle
    > > about 90 mbits/second of traffic...a far cry from the 1gbit/sec the
    > > add claimed. I'm just getting concerned-can this unit do at least the
    > > majority of the things listed in the auction, or have I been scammed?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Eric Kotz
    > >
    > >
    Eric Kotz, Oct 17, 2003
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    Eric Kotz <> wrote:
    :Here's a link to the auction

    :http://page.auctions.shopping.yahoo.com/auction/82090734?aucview=0x70

    Ah, I can't access that one.

    :Are there any
    :hardware upgrades that can be done to make it capable of running
    :current software (I understand it's just a PC-I think a Pentium 133 in
    :the unit I bought)

    If it is the PIX Classic that I suspect, then 5.3(5) is the last
    version it can run, but it can be a nuisance to get it up to that
    level. Going past somewhere around 4.4 requires a new software key,
    and Cisco isn't going to give you that key for free, as PIX software
    is not transferable.

    To run anything past 4.2(5) requires more memory than the original
    PIX were sold with, but you should be able to get the memory for
    less than $US100 or so.


    : Or did I just spend $250 on a paperweight for
    :really big sheets of paper??

    :Can anyone offer some insite as to how inaccurate the description
    :is-is it even remotely correct, or should I be telling this guy I want
    :my money back (I don't have the unit yet) Is it remotely similar to
    :the 535?

    We'd need to know the true model, and the true version of
    software installed.

    If you can get it up to around PIX software level 5.2(3) or beyond,
    then you can do some useful things with it. All of the PIX models
    run the same software image (but not all commands are available
    on all of them.) It's not going to be a fast unit, but by 5.2
    most of the essential features were in place.

    On the other hand, as the software isn't transferable, and the original
    cost of those units was amazingly high, you will have a hard time
    getting any newer software release for a reasonable cost. If your
    purpose is to learn about modern PIXes, my personal evaluation is that
    the 4.x software series would be a waste of time to start learning on,
    with all of the key features having mutated drastically since the time
    of 4.x. With a PIX 501 costing less than $US400, if the unit you
    bid on does not have modern software, I'd say you'd be better off
    refusing it and going for a 501.
    --
    vi -- think of it as practice for the ROGUE Olympics!
    Walter Roberson, Oct 17, 2003
    #6
  7. Eric Kotz

    Eric Kotz Guest

    The unit does appear to be a pix classic-it looks like the classic in
    the illustrations that were posted.
    The seller indicated it was running IOS 2.1x, (That number sounds too
    low, but I'm not terribly familiar with IOS...maybe PIX OS 2.1x?) and
    also indicated it was the early edition of the 535 enterprise PIX.
    I guess it sounds like I've gotten taken for a ride here. Right now
    the seller has my money, but has not yet shipped it. What are some
    intelligent things I can say/ask the seller-should I let him ship it
    and see if it can do what he claims in the add, and then deal with it
    as necessary, or is the concensus that the add outright lies and I
    should see if he's willing to refund my money and just cancle the
    whole transaction. I guess I'm looking for any thoughts/suggestions
    here.

    Thanks,
    Eric Kotz



    -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message news:<bmp5iu$884$>...
    > In article <>,
    > Eric Kotz <> wrote:
    > :Hey all, I was the high bidder on a PIX firewall today
    >
    > :I'm thinking I'm being
    > :misinformed/taken for a ride here.
    >
    > :Here's what I know about the PIX. First he said it was an early
    > :version of the 535. Later on the seller said it was the 535's
    > :predecessor. The part number is 47-3158-0.
    >
    > Cisco doesn't use numeric part numbers for any PIX model.
    >
    > :From the pictures I can see the unit's in a rackmount case-it looks
    > :like it's 4U tall. It has a hinged door on the front and has a floppy
    > :drive behind it.
    >
    > That's an original PIX, now known as the "PIX Firewall Classic".
    > Look carefully at the installation diagrams in this reference,
    > and notice that only the original PIX had the swing-down door:
    >
    > http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products...stallation_guide_chapter09186a0080089c8a.html
    >
    > By the time of the PIX 10000, the hinged door was gone and the floppy
    > migrated further to the right. By the time of the first 500 series,
    > the devices were no longer as tall.
    >
    >
    > :The seller posted the following description
    > :---START---
    > :The world-leading Cisco PIX 500 Series Firewalls are purpose-built
    > :security appliances that deliver unprecedented levels of security,
    > :performance and reliability.
    >
    > They are, but it's not a PIX 500 series!
    >
    >
    > :The PIX
    > :Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    > :environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    > :ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections.
    >
    > The seller is quoting current product literature representing the
    > maximum capacity of the series. The 535 is the only (stand-alone)
    > member of the line able to provide over 1 Gbps.
    >
    >
    > :Administrators can also manage PIX firewalls using
    > :a convenient command-line interface (CLI) through a variety of methods
    > :including Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH) and an out-of-band console port.
    >
    > The first version that supported ssh was 5.2(1), which required
    > 16 Mb of flash and 32 Mb of RAM. As best I can gather, many of the
    > PIX Classic were left somewhere around 4.2 release (more memory
    > was required after 4.2(5)), and it wouldn't surprise me if the
    > unit you bid on was down around 4.2(2).
    >
    >
    > :From what I've been able
    > :to scrounge from the net, it seems like this unit can only handle
    > :about 90 mbits/second of traffic...a far cry from the 1gbit/sec the
    > :add claimed.
    >
    > 45 Mbps for the PIX Classic.
    >
    >
    > :I'm just getting concerned-can this unit do at least the
    > :majority of the things listed in the auction, or have I been scammed?
    >
    >
    > Was there anything else in the actual ad, other than quoting the
    > Cisco sales literature? Because what it sounds like at the moment
    > is akin to attaching a description of a modern Porche to a sale of
    > an original Volkswagen Beatle -- the description itself isn't -wrong-,
    > it just doesn't apply!
    >
    > Based on the ad, you have a right to expect at least something
    > in the 500 series range, the oldest of which appears to be the 515
    > when I look at the technical documentation. [Odd, I had always
    > thought the 510 was before the 515.] The tall unit you describe
    > is not in the 500 series.
    Eric Kotz, Oct 18, 2003
    #7
  8. Eric Kotz

    mikester Guest

    A while ago, I went through the motions of upgrading a 520 to have
    enough memory to run current code - I never actually did though
    because it was cheaper and smarter to buy the newer 515.

    Depends on your discount level..but still...it was cheaper to buy the
    new one.
    mikester, Oct 18, 2003
    #8
  9. In article <>,
    Eric Kotz <> wrote:
    :The unit does appear to be a pix classic-it looks like the classic in
    :the illustrations that were posted.
    :The seller indicated it was running IOS 2.1x, (That number sounds too
    :low, but I'm not terribly familiar with IOS...maybe PIX OS 2.1x?) and

    Oh my.

    If it is PIX 2.1, then it might not even have the Cisco brand name
    on it. The oldest online documentation that Cisco has is for PIX 2.7.14.
    They bought the product line as I recall. There isn't anywhere on
    the net that appears to have documentation for PIX 2.6 or earlier.

    If it is really PIX 2.1, then it is a museum piece. Seriously.


    :also indicated it was the early edition of the 535 enterprise PIX.

    Yeah, right, in about the same sense that a genuine IBM PC running
    DOS 2 is an "early edition" of a modern Windows XP machine.


    :I guess it sounds like I've gotten taken for a ride here. Right now
    :the seller has my money, but has not yet shipped it.

    If you used a credit card, tell the seller that he massively represented
    the unit, and prepare to dispute the charges through your credit card
    company.


    :What are some
    :intelligent things I can say/ask the seller-should I let him ship it
    :and see if it can do what he claims in the add, and then deal with it
    :as necessary, or is the concensus that the add outright lies and I
    :should see if he's willing to refund my money and just cancle the
    :whole transaction.

    The PIX 2.x software is only vaguely close to the current 6.x software.
    Almost no commands are the same.

    You will have to decide to either accept it *as* a museum piece,
    or to tell the seller that it was substantially misrepresented and
    you want to cancel. Your chances of getting your money back after
    you have the unit in your hand are small.

    If it is as old as it sounds, someone on the group might be willing
    to pay that $US209 for it to put in a collection.
    --
    "[...] it's all part of one's right to be publicly stupid." -- Dave Smey
    Walter Roberson, Oct 18, 2003
    #9
  10. In article <bmqema$q0m$>,
    Walter Roberson <-cnrc.gc.ca> wrote:
    :If it is PIX 2.1, then it might not even have the Cisco brand name
    :eek:n it. The oldest online documentation that Cisco has is for PIX 2.7.14.
    :They bought the product line as I recall.

    Found a reference. The original company name was "Network Translation"
    (NTI). One poster recalls that the original OS (now called 'Finesse')
    might originally have been called "Phoenix", but I haven't confirmed that.

    The press release about the purchase was:
    http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/146/pressroom/1995/oct95/242.html

    Interesting little article I found in google's cache of
    triangle.bizjournals.com :

    TBJ: MCNC's Center for Network Testing Services recently held a
    "Switch-a-thon" to test the interoperability for IP switching across
    a variety of platforms. A number of companies including IBM,
    3Com Corp. and Digital Equipment Corp. were there. Why wasn't
    Cisco Systems represented?

    Meltzer: We weren't invited. Plus, IP switching is not the only
    answer. We consider "Tag" switching to be a better technology than
    IP switching. Tag switching is a multiprotocol approach, and
    customers today have a large number of protocols in their system.
    This technology is designed to take advantage of higher levels of
    intelligence on the edge of the network.

    TBJ: What, exactly, is "tag" switching?

    Meltzer: Tag switching uses label-swapping techniques. When a
    packet of information with a tag is received by a tag switch, the
    switch uses the tag as an index in its Tag Information Base (TIB). If
    the switch finds an entry with the incoming tag equal to the tag
    carried in the packet, it replaces the tag in the packet with the
    outgoing tag and forwards the packet. And while it does not rely on
    ATM, it can be applied to ATM switches. We believe this is a
    technology that will improve the scalability of IP networks.


    Ohhhhh... and an even more interesting article:

    http://groups.google.ca/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&selm=

    The first commerical NAT product, the Network Translation PIX Firewall
    was written using Plan 9.

    The author of that article was a co-founder of Network Translation. In
    a later article, he claims that PIX was a pun on "P - IX" for Plan 9.
    He talks more about the experience here:

    http://groups.google.ca/groups?selm=
    --
    Take care in opening this message: My grasp on reality may have shaken
    loose during transmission!
    Walter Roberson, Oct 18, 2003
    #10
  11. Re: Question about older PIX / is the seller lying/misinforming tome?

    Eric Kotz wrote:
    > the seller has my money, but has not yet shipped it. What are some
    > intelligent things I can say/ask the seller-should I let him ship it....


    The ad claims " Cisco PIX 500 Series Firewalls...." and ".....for
    multimedia applications and protocols including Voice over IP (VoIP),
    H.323, SIP, Skinny and Microsoft NetMeeting, ...." and "....provides
    over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the ability to handle up to
    500,000 concurrent connections..."

    neither of which are anywhere near the truth for that particular model.

    I'd use that to get out of the deal. If the seller whines, you should be
    able to go back to yahoo, as the hardware was clearly mis-represented.

    --Mike
    Michael Janke, Oct 18, 2003
    #11
  12. Eric Kotz

    Hugo Drax Guest

    "Eric Kotz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for your response. Here's a link to the auction, if anyone has
    > a Yahoo account I think you can access it:
    > http://page.auctions.shopping.yahoo.com/auction/82090734?aucview=0x70
    > The auction closed for $209 plus $50 shipping. I know that's a lot
    > less than a 535 would fetch on eBay-but that didn't even make me
    > blink, as I've picked up stuff for 1/10 it's eBay value there (yahoo
    > auctions) before (Gigabit ethernet switch for $30 for instance)
    > Did I still buy the unit for a reasonable price? Are there any
    > hardware upgrades that can be done to make it capable of running
    > current software (I understand it's just a PC-I think a Pentium 133 in
    > the unit I bought) Or did I just spend $250 on a paperweight for
    > really big sheets of paper??
    > Can anyone offer some insite as to how inaccurate the description
    > is-is it even remotely correct, or should I be telling this guy I want
    > my money back (I don't have the unit yet) Is it remotely similar to
    > the 535?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Eric Kotz
    >


    you bought a paperweight. why did you decide to do the reaserch now after
    you sent your cash? get a pix 501 instead it will run 6.3.3
    Hugo Drax, Oct 21, 2003
    #12
  13. Eric Kotz

    Hugo Drax Guest

    "Walter Roberson" <-cnrc.gc.ca> wrote in message
    news:bmqoma$129$...
    > In article <bmqema$q0m$>,
    > Walter Roberson <-cnrc.gc.ca> wrote:
    > :If it is PIX 2.1, then it might not even have the Cisco brand name
    > :eek:n it. The oldest online documentation that Cisco has is for PIX 2.7.14.
    > :They bought the product line as I recall.
    >
    > Found a reference. The original company name was "Network Translation"
    > (NTI). One poster recalls that the original OS (now called 'Finesse')
    > might originally have been called "Phoenix", but I haven't confirmed that.
    >
    > The press release about the purchase was:
    > http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/146/pressroom/1995/oct95/242.html
    >
    > Interesting little article I found in google's cache of
    > triangle.bizjournals.com :
    >
    > TBJ: MCNC's Center for Network Testing Services recently held a
    > "Switch-a-thon" to test the interoperability for IP switching across
    > a variety of platforms. A number of companies including IBM,
    > 3Com Corp. and Digital Equipment Corp. were there. Why wasn't
    > Cisco Systems represented?
    >
    > Meltzer: We weren't invited. Plus, IP switching is not the only
    > answer. We consider "Tag" switching to be a better technology than
    > IP switching. Tag switching is a multiprotocol approach, and
    > customers today have a large number of protocols in their system.
    > This technology is designed to take advantage of higher levels of
    > intelligence on the edge of the network.
    >
    > TBJ: What, exactly, is "tag" switching?
    >
    > Meltzer: Tag switching uses label-swapping techniques. When a
    > packet of information with a tag is received by a tag switch, the
    > switch uses the tag as an index in its Tag Information Base (TIB). If
    > the switch finds an entry with the incoming tag equal to the tag
    > carried in the packet, it replaces the tag in the packet with the
    > outgoing tag and forwards the packet. And while it does not rely on
    > ATM, it can be applied to ATM switches. We believe this is a
    > technology that will improve the scalability of IP networks.
    >
    >
    > Ohhhhh... and an even more interesting article:
    >
    >

    http://groups.google.ca/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&selm=
    >
    > The first commerical NAT product, the Network Translation PIX Firewall
    > was written using Plan 9.
    >
    > The author of that article was a co-founder of Network Translation. In
    > a later article, he claims that PIX was a pun on "P - IX" for Plan 9.
    > He talks more about the experience here:
    >
    > http://groups.google.ca/groups?selm=
    > --
    > Take care in opening this message: My grasp on reality may have shaken
    > loose during transmission!


    I wonder if anyone has any documentation on the original NTI boxes online or
    OS 1.0
    Hugo Drax, Oct 21, 2003
    #13
  14. the 535 is the top of the line Pix box. intended for ISP or very large
    companies. it doesn't have any floppy drives. I thought the only Pix in
    the 500 series that had a floppy was the 520
    Canadian pricing on a base model restricted 535 model is $12'325, or US
    pricing would probably be 10 or 11k

    the statement
    >The PIX Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    > environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    > ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections.


    Would only be a valid description for the 535. i could not find any
    reference to the part number with my Cisco login either

    Claude

    --





    *****to e-mail me directly remove NOSPAM in e-mail address*******

    "Eric Kotz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey all, I was the high bidder on a PIX firewall today (not on
    > eBay...you have to register on the site to view closed auctions so
    > it's not worth the effort of providing a link), and I've been doing
    > some additional research this evening and I'm thinking I'm being
    > misinformed/taken for a ride here. I'm going to admit that I know
    > next to nothing about the PIX-I'm a college student who purchased it
    > just to learn about it by playing with it. I don't want to make
    > accusations without the opinions of someone who knows more about them.
    > Here's what I know about the PIX. First he said it was an early
    > version of the 535. Later on the seller said it was the 535's
    > predecessor. The part number is 47-3158-0.
    > From the pictures I can see the unit's in a rackmount case-it looks
    > like it's 4U tall. It has a hinged door on the front and has a floppy
    > drive behind it.
    > The seller posted the following description
    > ---START---
    > The world-leading Cisco PIX 500 Series Firewalls are purpose-built
    > security appliances that deliver unprecedented levels of security,
    > performance and reliability. These platforms provide robust,
    > enterprise-class security services including stateful inspection
    > firewalling, standards-based IPsec Virtual Private Networking (VPN),
    > intrusion protection and much more in cost-effecective, easy to deploy
    > solutions. Ranging from compact, plug-n-play desktop firewalls for
    > small/home offices to carrier class gigabit firewalls for the most
    > demanding enterprise and service provider environments, The PIX
    > Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    > environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    > ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections. Built upon a
    > hardened, purpose-built operating system for security services, PIX
    > OS, PIX Firewalls provide the highest levels of security and have
    > earned many industry accolades including ICSA Firewall and IPsec
    > certification as well as Common Criteria EAL4 evaluation status. PIX
    > Firewalls provide a wide range of security and networking services
    > including Network Address Translation (NAT), Port Address Translation
    > (PAT), content filtering (Java/ActiveX), URL filtering, AAA
    > (RADIUS/TACACS+) integration, support for leading X.509 PKI solutions,
    > DHCP client/server, PPPoE support (coming in Q1 2002) and much more.
    > PIX Firewalls also provide advanced security services for multimedia
    > applications and protocols including Voice over IP (VoIP), H.323, SIP,
    > Skinny and Microsoft NetMeeting, giving you the peace of mind when
    > deploying next generation converged network services. Administrators
    > can choose from a wide variety of solutions for remotely configuring,
    > monitoring and troubleshooting PIX firewalls. These solutions range
    > from an integrated, Web-based management interface (PIX Device
    > Manager) to centralized, policy-based management tools to support for
    > remote monitoring protocols such as Simple Network Management Protocol
    > (SNMP) and syslog. Administrators can also manage PIX firewalls using
    > a convenient command-line interface (CLI) through a variety of methods
    > including Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH) and an out-of-band console port.
    > ---END---
    > Now, I've been doing some research, and the pictures look more like a
    > PIX Classic/10000 (Are these the same/what's different?)
    > Poking around on Cisco's site, I find that there's very little
    > information (virtually none) on this unit. From what I've been able
    > to scrounge from the net, it seems like this unit can only handle
    > about 90 mbits/second of traffic...a far cry from the 1gbit/sec the
    > add claimed. I'm just getting concerned-can this unit do at least the
    > majority of the things listed in the auction, or have I been scammed?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Eric Kotz
    >
    Claude LeFort, Oct 25, 2003
    #14
  15. Actually, no 500 series PIX had the floppy.

    MIke
    "Claude LeFort" <> wrote in message news:<VnBmb.2332$>...
    > the 535 is the top of the line Pix box. intended for ISP or very large
    > companies. it doesn't have any floppy drives. I thought the only Pix in
    > the 500 series that had a floppy was the 520
    > Canadian pricing on a base model restricted 535 model is $12'325, or US
    > pricing would probably be 10 or 11k
    >
    > the statement
    > >The PIX Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    > > environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    > > ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections.

    >
    > Would only be a valid description for the 535. i could not find any
    > reference to the part number with my Cisco login either
    >
    > Claude
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > *****to e-mail me directly remove NOSPAM in e-mail address*******
    >
    > "Eric Kotz" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hey all, I was the high bidder on a PIX firewall today (not on
    > > eBay...you have to register on the site to view closed auctions so
    > > it's not worth the effort of providing a link), and I've been doing
    > > some additional research this evening and I'm thinking I'm being
    > > misinformed/taken for a ride here. I'm going to admit that I know
    > > next to nothing about the PIX-I'm a college student who purchased it
    > > just to learn about it by playing with it. I don't want to make
    > > accusations without the opinions of someone who knows more about them.
    > > Here's what I know about the PIX. First he said it was an early
    > > version of the 535. Later on the seller said it was the 535's
    > > predecessor. The part number is 47-3158-0.
    > > From the pictures I can see the unit's in a rackmount case-it looks
    > > like it's 4U tall. It has a hinged door on the front and has a floppy
    > > drive behind it.
    > > The seller posted the following description
    > > ---START---
    > > The world-leading Cisco PIX 500 Series Firewalls are purpose-built
    > > security appliances that deliver unprecedented levels of security,
    > > performance and reliability. These platforms provide robust,
    > > enterprise-class security services including stateful inspection
    > > firewalling, standards-based IPsec Virtual Private Networking (VPN),
    > > intrusion protection and much more in cost-effecective, easy to deploy
    > > solutions. Ranging from compact, plug-n-play desktop firewalls for
    > > small/home offices to carrier class gigabit firewalls for the most
    > > demanding enterprise and service provider environments, The PIX
    > > Firewall is intended for large Enterprise and Service Provider
    > > environments, provides over 1 Gbps of firewall throughput with the
    > > ability to handle up to 500,000 concurrent connections. Built upon a
    > > hardened, purpose-built operating system for security services, PIX
    > > OS, PIX Firewalls provide the highest levels of security and have
    > > earned many industry accolades including ICSA Firewall and IPsec
    > > certification as well as Common Criteria EAL4 evaluation status. PIX
    > > Firewalls provide a wide range of security and networking services
    > > including Network Address Translation (NAT), Port Address Translation
    > > (PAT), content filtering (Java/ActiveX), URL filtering, AAA
    > > (RADIUS/TACACS+) integration, support for leading X.509 PKI solutions,
    > > DHCP client/server, PPPoE support (coming in Q1 2002) and much more.
    > > PIX Firewalls also provide advanced security services for multimedia
    > > applications and protocols including Voice over IP (VoIP), H.323, SIP,
    > > Skinny and Microsoft NetMeeting, giving you the peace of mind when
    > > deploying next generation converged network services. Administrators
    > > can choose from a wide variety of solutions for remotely configuring,
    > > monitoring and troubleshooting PIX firewalls. These solutions range
    > > from an integrated, Web-based management interface (PIX Device
    > > Manager) to centralized, policy-based management tools to support for
    > > remote monitoring protocols such as Simple Network Management Protocol
    > > (SNMP) and syslog. Administrators can also manage PIX firewalls using
    > > a convenient command-line interface (CLI) through a variety of methods
    > > including Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH) and an out-of-band console port.
    > > ---END---
    > > Now, I've been doing some research, and the pictures look more like a
    > > PIX Classic/10000 (Are these the same/what's different?)
    > > Poking around on Cisco's site, I find that there's very little
    > > information (virtually none) on this unit. From what I've been able
    > > to scrounge from the net, it seems like this unit can only handle
    > > about 90 mbits/second of traffic...a far cry from the 1gbit/sec the
    > > add claimed. I'm just getting concerned-can this unit do at least the
    > > majority of the things listed in the auction, or have I been scammed?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Eric Kotz
    > >
    Mike Gallagher, Oct 26, 2003
    #15
  16. Re: Question about older PIX / is the seller lying/misinforming tome?

    Mike Gallagher wrote:
    > Actually, no 500 series PIX had the floppy.
    >


    520's did. I have 4 of them that could be booted from floppy.

    --Mike
    Michael Janke, Oct 26, 2003
    #16
  17. In article <>,
    Mike Gallagher <> wrote:
    :Actually, no 500 series PIX had the floppy.

    http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/110/upgrade.shtml

    Creating a Bootable Diskette from Microsoft Windows

    Note: The steps described below apply only to PIX devices that have
    a floppy drive. Specifically, this group is limited to the PIX
    Classic, 10000, 510 and 520.



    For a summary of the differences between the various PIX models,
    please see my list at
    http://www.ibd.nrc.ca/~roberson/cisco_pix_models.txt
    --
    WW{Backus,Church,Dijkstra,Knuth,Hollerith,Turing,vonNeumann}D ?
    Walter Roberson, Oct 26, 2003
    #17
  18. Yes, that's right they did. I was thinking of the lockable floppy.
    They stopped that after the 10000.

    Mike
    Michael Janke <> wrote in message news:<otTmb.27540$ao4.42219@attbi_s51>...
    > Mike Gallagher wrote:
    > > Actually, no 500 series PIX had the floppy.
    > >

    >
    > 520's did. I have 4 of them that could be booted from floppy.
    >
    > --Mike
    Mike Gallagher, Oct 27, 2003
    #18
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. G. Morgan

    recieve $1200 for referring one home seller!

    G. Morgan, Oct 19, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    461
    Tjymas Blackmore
    Oct 19, 2004
  2. Dr Rich

    info on Ebay seller

    Dr Rich, Oct 25, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    2,930
    Gisle Hannemyr
    Dec 15, 2004
  3. Bob Martin

    Cheapest digital seller in Australia?

    Bob Martin, Jan 17, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    1,406
    Peter Gordon
    Jan 19, 2004
  4. DonB

    On-line software seller recommendation?

    DonB, Mar 4, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    307
    Marvin Margoshes
    Mar 5, 2004
  5. Elmer

    Lying Swine Tech Support Question

    Elmer, Feb 22, 2008, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    549
Loading...

Share This Page