QoS and VoIP

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by Chris Davies, Sep 27, 2007.

  1. Chris Davies

    Chris Davies Guest

    I'm stumped. I'm trying to get my (Debian "lenny") GNU/Linux server to
    prioritise VoIP traffic and I've been reading guides until my head feels
    like it's going to explode. I've got as far as these requirements:

    1. I don't want to install imq if I can help it; surely there must be
    some other queuing discipline thingy that can work for me?

    2. I want three or four queues. In descending priority these are: VoIP,
    [high,] medium (default), and P2P

    3. Traffic should be allocated to a queue by its iptables mark (I'm
    comfortable with iptables, so that bit's straightforward.)

    4. My server sits between my ADSL modem/router and the remainder of my
    network. I get 7000 Mb/s down and 448 Kb/s up (yes, really) so there's no
    point in flooding the modem/router with more traffic than it can handle.


    The most promising was the guide at
    http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/do...l_single/ADSL-Bandwidth-Management-HOWTO.html,
    but (a) it refers to code written in 2002, and (b) it needs this imq
    module.

    Thanks,
    Chris

    PS. A reason for not building a custom kernel? Xen.
    Chris Davies, Sep 27, 2007
    #1
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  2. Chris Davies <> wrote:
    > I'm stumped. I'm trying to get my (Debian "lenny") GNU/Linux server to
    > prioritise VoIP traffic and I've been reading guides until my head feels
    > like it's going to explode. I've got as far as these requirements:
    >
    > 1. I don't want to install imq if I can help it; surely there must be
    > some other queuing discipline thingy that can work for me?
    >
    > 2. I want three or four queues. In descending priority these are: VoIP,
    > [high,] medium (default), and P2P
    >
    > 3. Traffic should be allocated to a queue by its iptables mark (I'm
    > comfortable with iptables, so that bit's straightforward.)
    >
    > 4. My server sits between my ADSL modem/router and the remainder of my
    > network. I get 7000 Mb/s down and 448 Kb/s up (yes, really) so there's no
    > point in flooding the modem/router with more traffic than it can handle.


    I recommend installing the wondershaper script

    Either from here http://lartc.org/wondershaper/

    Or from the debian package of the same name.

    It obeys the tos rules so will probably do exactly what you want. It
    will lower your maximum throughput slightly but you need to keep the
    queues nearly empty at your ISP if you want low latency.

    Spend some time tuning it to your ADSL line and it will fix all your
    VOIP/ssh problems while you are doing big downloads / uploads!

    --
    Nick Craig-Wood <> -- http://www.craig-wood.com/nick
    Nick Craig-Wood, Sep 28, 2007
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  3. Chris Davies

    Chris Davies Guest

    Chris Davies <> wrote:
    > I'm stumped. I'm trying to get my (Debian "lenny") GNU/Linux server to
    > prioritise VoIP traffic [...]


    In uk.telecom.voip Nick Craig-Wood <> wrote:
    > I recommend installing the wondershaper script


    Stunning. Thank you very much!
    Chris
    Chris Davies, Sep 28, 2007
    #3
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