Q: Whats the best way to take pictures of paintings?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Scratch, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. Scratch

    Scratch Guest

    Hi,

    Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.

    Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?

    THX for ur time
    Scratch
    Scratch, Jun 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. Scratch

    Gray Ghost Guest

    Why not take pictures of them with a digital camera that's on a tripod?

    Scratch wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    > tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    > and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    > regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >
    > Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?
    >
    > THX for ur time
    > Scratch
    >
    Gray Ghost, Jun 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. Scratch

    Parko Guest

    Scratch wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    > tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    > and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    > regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >
    > Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?
    >
    > THX for ur time
    > Scratch


    Use a large format film camera ie: 120mm, not 35mm, a tripod, and indirect
    lighting. Never use a flash, you'll get flare. Scan the prints. I *am* an
    artist. No website though. Maybe one day.
    --
    Parko
    Registered Linux User #339345
    Defenestrate Windows!
    Parko, Jun 30, 2005
    #3
  4. Re: Whats the best way to take pictures of paintings?

    "Scratch" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    > tried digital cmera


    What kind of digicam? What resolution? What lighting?

    > but not impressed by the result. A little shaky...


    Shaky? Try a tripod.

    > and the quality is not good.


    Again, what kind of digicam? You'll get about the same sort of results from
    a cheap digicam as you'll get from a cheap Kodak Instamatic camera.

    > Im thinking to take pictures using a
    > regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.


    What kind of camera?

    > Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?


    Sure. Do what pros do. Pay attention to lighting, stability (tripod mount)
    and quality of optics. And take lots and lots of pics at different
    exposures, ISO speeds and apertures. Pick out the good ones and discard the
    rest...or Photoshop 'em to get a usable result.
    Oxford Systems, Jun 30, 2005
    #4
  5. "Parko" <> wrote in message
    news:5_Lwe.9922$...
    > Scratch wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    >> tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    >> and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    >> regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >>
    >> Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?
    >>
    >> THX for ur time
    >> Scratch

    >
    > Use a large format film camera ie: 120mm, not 35mm


    [snip]

    Tell 'em what this is gonna cost.
    Oxford Systems, Jun 30, 2005
    #5
  6. Scratch

    EricP Guest

    On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 13:45:03 +0900, Scratch <> babbled
    like a waterfall and said:

    >Hi,
    >
    >Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    >tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    >and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    >regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >
    >Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?
    >
    >THX for ur time
    >Scratch


    You will need a cheap tripod for the camera. The only other problem is
    lighting the picture. Easiest way is sunlight filtered through a net
    curtain, so you avoid reflections and light the picture evenly.

    A professional would have an easel for the subject with filtered
    lights mounted at 45 degrees to the surface of the subject on either
    side of it.

    HTH
    EricP, Jun 30, 2005
    #6
  7. Scratch

    joevan Guest

    On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 13:45:03 +0900, Scratch <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    >tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    >and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    >regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >
    >Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?
    >
    >THX for ur time
    >Scratch

    Like pro or cheap kinda like pro. Make up your mind.
    I have been taking pictures of paintings for 30 years.
    Camera on tripod, painting on easel or slantboard.
    500 watt 3200 kelvin bulbs (ECT) at either side of the painting so as
    not to cause reflection or glare. That can be a problem if there are
    raised areas of the paint. Then you need polar filters over each light
    and one on you lens. You can always try google for how to photograph.
    You might luck out and hit on some good tips.
    The pros use strobes, 4x5 cameras with color transparencies.
    If you want to get serious go to school, learn then 6 thousand or so
    bucks might get you started.

    --
    "Politicians are like diapers. They should both be changed frequently
    and for the same reason."
    joevan, Jun 30, 2005
    #7
  8. Scratch

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 11:09:54 GMT, joevan <>
    wrote:

    >Like pro or cheap kinda like pro. Make up your mind.


    Where did the OP ever mention 'cheap' or 'kinda cheap' or any mention
    of price for that matter?
    --
    To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.
    Evan Platt, Jun 30, 2005
    #8
  9. Scratch

    joevan Guest

    On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 09:00:10 -0700, Evan Platt
    <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 11:09:54 GMT, joevan <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Like pro or cheap kinda like pro. Make up your mind.

    >
    >Where did the OP ever mention 'cheap' or 'kinda cheap' or any mention
    >of price for that matter?

    I didn't mean to suggest that he did. I was just trying to get to the
    bottom of the matter. Sorry if it sounded harsh. I was leading I
    guess.


    --
    "Politicians are like diapers. They should both be changed frequently
    and for the same reason."
    joevan, Jun 30, 2005
    #9
  10. Scratch

    Rick Merrill Guest

    joevan wrote:

    > On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 13:45:03 +0900, Scratch <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    >>tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    >>and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    >>regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >>
    >>Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?
    >>
    >>THX for ur time
    >>Scratch

    >
    > Like pro or cheap kinda like pro. Make up your mind.
    > I have been taking pictures of paintings for 30 years.
    > Camera on tripod, painting on easel or slantboard.
    > 500 watt 3200 kelvin bulbs (ECT) at either side of the painting so as
    > not to cause reflection or glare. That can be a problem if there are
    > raised areas of the paint. Then you need polar filters over each light
    > and one on you lens. You can always try google for how to photograph.
    > You might luck out and hit on some good tips.
    > The pros use strobes, 4x5 cameras with color transparencies.
    > If you want to get serious go to school, learn then 6 thousand or so
    > bucks might get you started.
    >


    Can you recommend a source of Polarized filters?

    (yeah, cheap would be goot :) )
    Rick Merrill, Jun 30, 2005
    #10
  11. Scratch

    Mick Guest

    >>Use a large format film camera ie:

    That will cost a minimum of $600-800.

    The resolution of 35 mm films is so much better than it ever was that film
    format is less an issue than technique. (Of course, high-quality digital --
    at least 5 mpx -- is equally good and you can enhance in Photoshop or Paint
    Shop Pro (the low-cost alternative to Photoshop that does a lot of the same
    things; of course, pro designers need Photoshop, but most amateurs can get
    by with PSP).

    Use a medium-fast color film (or digital)

    Use print film if you can scan at hi-res (at least 1200 dpi; 2400 is
    better); transparencies if you've got a film attachment on your scanner.

    Definitely use a tripod

    Buy an inexpensive shutter release cable. This mounts to the shutter button,
    and when you squeeze the tip, it depresses the shutter, ensuring that you
    won't spoil the picture with ham-handed shutter depression

    Do not use flash

    Bracket the photos (1 stop under, one stop over, one stop right on the spot)

    HTH
    Mikc






    "Oxford Systems" <> wrote in message
    news:VoNwe.11289$...
    > "Parko" <> wrote in message
    > news:5_Lwe.9922$...
    >> Scratch wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    >>> tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    >>> and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    >>> regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >>>
    >>> Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?
    >>>
    >>> THX for ur time
    >>> Scratch

    >>
    >> Use a large format film camera ie: 120mm, not 35mm

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    > Tell 'em what this is gonna cost.
    >
    Mick, Jun 30, 2005
    #11
  12. Scratch

    Parko Guest

    Oxford Systems wrote:

    >> Use a large format film camera ie: 120mm, not 35mm

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    > Tell 'em what this is gonna cost.


    What? A Hasselblad?
    Neat cameras though, if you're serious.
    http://www.hasselblad.se/
    The Gimp will do the webby stuff easily. Hint: Xtns > Script Fu > Logos for
    naff page headers.
    --
    Parko
    Registered Linux User #339345
    Used and reccomended by.
    Parko, Jul 1, 2005
    #12
  13. Scratch

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Parko" <> wrote in message
    news:eB1xe.10589$...
    > Oxford Systems wrote:
    >
    >>> Use a large format film camera ie: 120mm, not 35mm

    >>
    >> [snip]
    >>
    >> Tell 'em what this is gonna cost.

    >
    > What? A Hasselblad?
    > Neat cameras though, if you're serious.
    > http://www.hasselblad.se/
    > The Gimp will do the webby stuff easily. Hint: Xtns > Script Fu > Logos
    > for
    > naff page headers.
    >

    Dad couldn't even afford one of those. He had a Mamiya RB67 Pro for his
    studio work...but then, he was only a part-timer <g>. I was really pissed
    when he had to sell it. I've really wanted to play with some medium format
    work now and then. At least my brother got most of the lighting equipment.
    He still uses it now and then.
    Toolman Tim, Jul 1, 2005
    #13
  14. Toolman Tim wrote:

    > "Parko" <> wrote in message
    > news:eB1xe.10589$...
    >> Oxford Systems wrote:


    >>>> Use a large format film camera ie: 120mm, not 35mm


    >>> [snip]


    >>> Tell 'em what this is gonna cost.


    >> What? A Hasselblad?
    >> Neat cameras though, if you're serious.
    >> http://www.hasselblad.se/
    >> The Gimp will do the webby stuff easily. Hint: Xtns > Script Fu > Logos
    >> for
    >> naff page headers.


    > Dad couldn't even afford one of those. He had a Mamiya RB67 Pro for his


    That's a sweet one.

    > studio work...but then, he was only a part-timer <g>. I was really pissed
    > when he had to sell it. I've really wanted to play with some medium format
    > work now and then. At least my brother got most of the lighting equipment.
    > He still uses it now and then.


    Did you ever get to do any 6x6/6x7 work?

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Killing all Usenet posts from Google Groups
    Info: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    *ALSO contains links for access to the NON-BETA GG archive interface*
    Blinky the Shark, Jul 1, 2005
    #14
  15. Scratch

    Plato Guest

    Scratch wrote:
    >
    > Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    > tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little shaky
    > and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures using a
    > regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >
    > Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?


    You need some light stands and a few "daylight" bulbs. Or, a few
    standard electronic flash units one with a slave. Set them at 45 degrees
    to the painting. The issue is the lighting, not the type of camera ie
    digigal vs film.




    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
    Plato, Jul 1, 2005
    #15
  16. Scratch

    Plato Guest

    EricP wrote:
    >
    > A professional would have an easel for the subject with filtered
    > lights mounted at 45 degrees to the surface of the subject on either
    > side of it.


    Right you dont use front flash on camera for paintings.
    Plato, Jul 1, 2005
    #16
  17. ..
    >
    > Definitely use a tripod
    >
    > Buy an inexpensive shutter release cable. This mounts to the shutter
    > button, and when you squeeze the tip, it depresses the shutter,
    > ensuring that you won't spoil the picture with ham-handed shutter
    > depression
    > Do not use flash
    >
    >
    > "Oxford Systems" <> wrote in message
    > news:VoNwe.11289$...
    >> "Parko" <> wrote in message
    >> news:5_Lwe.9922$...
    >>> Scratch wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Hi,
    >>>>
    >>>> Im trying to setup a web site for my collection of oil paintings. I
    >>>> tried digital cmera but not impressed by the result. A little
    >>>> shaky and the quality is not good. Im thinking to take pictures
    >>>> using a regular camera with a stand, and then scan them.
    >>>>
    >>>> Is there any other way to take pictures of paintings like pro?
    >>>>
    >>>> THX for ur time
    >>>> Scratch



    I put a number of my wife's paintings on her site (www.maggieowen.com) using
    a 2 MPixel camera and ambient light. After a bit of work using Photoshop,
    the results are fine. I wouldn't want to put high quality photos on the
    site for two reasons: first, they take a long time to load, and second, some
    bad person might copy them.

    Prints are a different matter. We have the paintings professionally
    photographed using an enormous camera. Then the photo is professionally
    scanned - that way we get wonderful resolution and the colours are
    duplicated exactly. It's pricey, but you get what you pay for.

    John
    ///Owen\\\\\\, Jul 1, 2005
    #17
  18. Scratch

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Blinky the Shark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Toolman Tim wrote:
    >
    >> "Parko" <> wrote in message
    >> news:eB1xe.10589$...
    >>> Oxford Systems wrote:

    >
    >>>>> Use a large format film camera ie: 120mm, not 35mm

    >
    >>>> [snip]

    >
    >>>> Tell 'em what this is gonna cost.

    >
    >>> What? A Hasselblad?
    >>> Neat cameras though, if you're serious.
    >>> http://www.hasselblad.se/
    >>> The Gimp will do the webby stuff easily. Hint: Xtns > Script Fu > Logos
    >>> for
    >>> naff page headers.

    >
    >> Dad couldn't even afford one of those. He had a Mamiya RB67 Pro for his

    >
    > That's a sweet one.
    >
    >> studio work...but then, he was only a part-timer <g>. I was really pissed
    >> when he had to sell it. I've really wanted to play with some medium
    >> format
    >> work now and then. At least my brother got most of the lighting
    >> equipment.
    >> He still uses it now and then.

    >
    > Did you ever get to do any 6x6/6x7 work?
    >

    Nah - way out of the realm of finance <g>

    But the RB67's are still out there - a good used one would tickle me pinkish
    ;o)
    Toolman Tim, Jul 1, 2005
    #18
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