Q: Upgrading IOS on 1600 .. where to get ?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Ralf Huelsmann, Nov 11, 2003.

  1. hi !

    i´m a little bit confused and google and the search on cisco.com doesn´t
    seem to help...

    what is the concept of cisco to provide ios-images ?

    i have a old 1600 i want to upgrade with a newer ios-version..

    where can i get it ?!?

    thanx
    ralf
    Ralf Huelsmann, Nov 11, 2003
    #1
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  2. Ralf Huelsmann

    Joe Drago Guest

    When you purchase a Cisco device, you are also purchasing the IOS currently
    on the device along with it. To upgrade your IOS, you must either purchase
    the IOS, or you must have a contract with Cisco. If you have a (SmartNet?)
    contract with Cisco, your CCO login will be upgraded so that the IOS images
    you need will be available for download.

    Joe Drago
    StreamLine Communications

    "Ralf Huelsmann" <> wrote in news:boqste
    $1hu9b9$-berlin.de:

    > hi !
    >
    > i´m a little bit confused and google and the search on cisco.com doesn´t
    > seem to help...
    >
    > what is the concept of cisco to provide ios-images ?
    >
    > i have a old 1600 i want to upgrade with a newer ios-version..
    >
    > where can i get it ?!?
    >
    > thanx
    > ralf
    >
    >
    Joe Drago, Nov 11, 2003
    #2
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  3. In article <Xns94306985930F5joedragosl@129.250.35.204>,
    Joe Drago <> wrote:
    :When you purchase a Cisco device, you are also purchasing the IOS currently
    :eek:n the device along with it.

    Cisco's license is clear that the software license is NOT transferable.
    If you purchase a used item, you must pay Cisco a re-licensing fee
    in order to use it entirely legally, in most parts of the world.

    On the other hand, the original poster appears to be in Germany,
    which I believe has a specific law that overrides no-transfer
    clauses in software licenses.
    --
    Admit it -- you peeked ahead to find out how this message ends!
    Walter Roberson, Nov 11, 2003
    #3
  4. quite strange...

    that way, if i need a security patch, there no way to get it for free ?!?

    > On the other hand, the original poster appears to be in Germany,
    > which I believe has a specific law that overrides no-transfer
    > clauses in software licenses.


    that´s totaly true.. here in germany it´s not legal to put clauses like
    that in the license , even it doesn´t matter to sell OEM licenses, nor tu
    buy a allready registered software if you have all media and license infos.
    Ralf Huelsmann, Nov 11, 2003
    #4
  5. In article <borh2t$1i3dm0$-berlin.de>,
    Ralf Huelsmann <> wrote:
    :quite strange...

    :that way, if i need a security patch, there no way to get it for free ?!?

    If you have an existing valid software license, then Cisco's policy
    is that you are entitled to their security fixes within the same
    version as what you already have.

    For your 1600, you would contact the TAC and refer them to the URL
    http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20030717-blocked.shtml
    indicating your current software release, and they would make available
    the replacement version.

    The 1600 series uses the regular IOS software stream with no
    upper-case letters except potentially 'T' -- e.g., 12.0(26)
    or 12.0(7)T3 but NOT 12.0(22)S5
    --
    Rome was built one paycheck at a time. -- Walter Roberson
    Walter Roberson, Nov 11, 2003
    #5
  6. Ralf Huelsmann

    Andre Beck Guest

    -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) writes:
    > In article <borh2t$1i3dm0$-berlin.de>,
    > Ralf Huelsmann <> wrote:
    > :quite strange...
    >
    > :that way, if i need a security patch, there no way to get it for free ?!?
    >
    > If you have an existing valid software license, then Cisco's policy
    > is that you are entitled to their security fixes within the same
    > version as what you already have.


    If it is not fixed in some really old version one might happen to have,
    it might even entitle for an upgrade.

    > The 1600 series uses the regular IOS software stream with no
    > upper-case letters except potentially 'T' -- e.g., 12.0(26)
    > or 12.0(7)T3 but NOT 12.0(22)S5


    If you indeed have a T train release, you should be entitled to receive
    a stable release anyway - T releases are beta versions after all. Cisco
    tends to sell boxes that indeed have a beta load (T or sometimes even
    worse X, Y or such side-side-trains). To some extend this is the only
    way to get them out as sometimes hardware is ready prior to software
    beeing stable. But seeing what you pay for Cisco hardware, it should
    be normal to expect to not receive banana products or at least to be
    entitled to upgrade to the next stable release. So if you happen to get
    a 12.0(7)T or such very popular beta, insist on getting a 12.1(latest)
    fix at your reseller, if there is any. Cisco has a >50 pages whitepaper
    on their versioning scheme and release process somewhere on CCO. Having
    read and understood that one is a big helper when it comes to discussions
    with suppliers regarding the software you should get. Some notoriously
    refuse to know what the T-train and its more volatile subcycles (XK and
    such) actually are - betas and alphas for the next minor numbered stable
    release.

    --
    The _S_anta _C_laus _O_peration
    or "how to turn a complete illusion into a neverending money source"

    -> Andre "ABPSoft" Beck +++ ABP-RIPE +++ Dresden, Germany, Spacetime <-
    Andre Beck, Nov 15, 2003
    #6
  7. "Andre Beck" <> wrote in message news:...
    > If you indeed have a T train release, you should be entitled to receive
    > a stable release anyway - T releases are beta versions after all.


    This is not true. T trains are subject to substantial automated testing
    prior to release, and are held to a lot of quality criteria that beta
    software is not subjected to. Cisco does have a formal Beta program, for
    which one has to sign up to receive pre-released images.

    You may choose to opine that the software is 'beta quality,' but it is not
    beta software. It is tested and released software which requires a
    maintenance contract for upgrades.
    Phillip Remaker, Nov 16, 2003
    #7
  8. Ralf Huelsmann

    Andre Beck Guest

    "Phillip Remaker" <> writes:
    > "Andre Beck" <> wrote in message news:...
    > > If you indeed have a T train release, you should be entitled to receive
    > > a stable release anyway - T releases are beta versions after all.

    >
    > This is not true. T trains are subject to substantial automated testing
    > prior to release, and are held to a lot of quality criteria that beta
    > software is not subjected to. Cisco does have a formal Beta program, for
    > which one has to sign up to receive pre-released images.


    As in philosophy, all that is mostly a matter of nomenclature. What others
    call "beta" or "unstable" is not actually untested, it is just not as
    stable as one would expect for a product to be sold. The T-train IMO does
    compare quite well to odd-numbered Linux kernel releases - those where
    major redesigns take place and things need a year or two to settle later
    in the following even-numbered release. Seeing what obscure bugs sometimes
    make it into T-releases (like "wr m" creates a config that upon reload
    can't be read in its entirety), I just call them beta or unstable - because
    these are words I know. Whether Cisco likes to call them "Early Deployment"
    makes no real difference, after all. I accept that such releases must
    exist. I just don't accept that if I happen to buy a box with such release,
    I should be stuck with an unstable software.

    > You may choose to opine that the software is 'beta quality,' but it is not
    > beta software.


    Nomenclature ;)

    From what you describe, they would compare best to what others call a
    "release candidate". But to be honest, something like 12.0(4)T didn't
    really qualify as a RC. 12.0(7)T did, but does this make much of a
    difference? Would you buy a product that comes bundled with a RC software
    and not expect to receive an included update to the final version?

    > It is tested and released software which requires a maintenance contract
    > for upgrades.


    Strange enough. So if you buy a box that happens to be so new it needs
    to be released with an ED load on it (T or even subcycles of T), you
    are never allowed to upgrade to the next *stable* release (one without
    a bad letter at the end [I know there are good letters like S, but that
    is another story], or one that has GD or at least LD marks on it) without
    having to pay for that again? Sorry, not with me. And so far, that argu-
    mentation worked. Whenever a box with a T or XK or such dropped into my
    office from some distributor and the two relevant CGIs at CCO (Upgrade
    Planner and HW-SW-Compat-Matrix) told me that there is a stable release
    available, I got it from them. May require some discussion and reasoning,
    but worked.

    --
    The _S_anta _C_laus _O_peration
    or "how to turn a complete illusion into a neverending money source"

    -> Andre "ABPSoft" Beck +++ ABP-RIPE +++ Dresden, Germany, Spacetime <-
    Andre Beck, Nov 16, 2003
    #8
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