[Q] Tripod with the long telephoto lens camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Healthy Strong, Aug 28, 2003.

  1. I need to take pictures of the baseball player at the major league
    baseball game. This is the first time I bought and used the telephoto
    lens and it is very surpring that this long telephoto lens does not
    stand firmly but always shaken.

    I brought the tripod to the Yankees Stadium and the security guards at
    the stadium didn't let me in with my tripod. This is very
    understandable situation because the Yankees Stadium in the New York
    City could easily be one of the major targets for the terrorists. To
    be honest, the regular tripod looks like the broken right arm of the
    terminator and it can intimidate people.

    So I bought the "compact" tripod, which is verythin, colorful, so
    doesn't look like the tripod but sort of umbrella. Fortunately I could
    pass the gate with this compact tripod, even though the security
    office kept looking at that compact tripod at my left hand.

    The problem is, this compact tripod just can't hold my telephoto lens
    camera good. Whenever I focus on the objects or players I want to take
    a shot and let that position stay, the camera slightly falls down and
    lose the objects on the sight. I tried to fix this problem but I just
    gave up.

    I've been trying to figure out how to solve this problem days and days
    and days. I believe it's time to ask help from everybody, if there's a
    solution. My gut feeling is that there's nothing much anyone can do at
    this situation, though.

    The only solution I can think of is that I just get the media pass and
    locate at the photographers' section besides the dugout and have
    enough freedom to take photo. Of course it is not going to happen
    because I'll never get the media pass.

    Please help me if you have a great idea. Thanks in advance.
    Healthy Strong, Aug 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. Healthy Strong

    JK Guest

    Healthy Strong wrote:

    > I need to take pictures of the baseball player at the major league
    > baseball game. This is the first time I bought and used the telephoto
    > lens and it is very surpring that this long telephoto lens does not
    > stand firmly but always shaken.


    What is surprising? The telephoto magnifies the camera shake.

    >
    >
    > I brought the tripod to the Yankees Stadium and the security guards at
    > the stadium didn't let me in with my tripod. This is very
    > understandable situation because the Yankees Stadium in the New York
    > City could easily be one of the major targets for the terrorists. To
    > be honest, the regular tripod looks like the broken right arm of the
    > terminator and it can intimidate people.


    If a tripod is in a case they might be scared of it, but the main reason
    why museums and other cramped public places don't want tripods is
    that they don't want someone to trip on it.

    >
    >
    > So I bought the "compact" tripod, which is verythin, colorful, so
    > doesn't look like the tripod but sort of umbrella. Fortunately I could
    > pass the gate with this compact tripod, even though the security
    > office kept looking at that compact tripod at my left hand.
    >
    > The problem is, this compact tripod just can't hold my telephoto lens
    > camera good. Whenever I focus on the objects or players I want to take
    > a shot and let that position stay, the camera slightly falls down and
    > lose the objects on the sight. I tried to fix this problem but I just
    > gave up.
    >
    > I've been trying to figure out how to solve this problem days and days
    > and days. I believe it's time to ask help from everybody, if there's a
    > solution. My gut feeling is that there's nothing much anyone can do at
    > this situation, though.
    >
    > The only solution I can think of is that I just get the media pass and
    > locate at the photographers' section besides the dugout and have
    > enough freedom to take photo. Of course it is not going to happen
    > because I'll never get the media pass.
    >
    > Please help me if you have a great idea. Thanks in advance.


    Why not try a monopod? There are monopods that double as
    walking sticks, so security probably wouldn't bother you.
    It does take some practice to get the most from using a monopod.
    JK, Aug 29, 2003
    #2
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  3. Healthy Strong

    Guest

    In message <>,
    JK <> wrote:

    >If a tripod is in a case they might be scared of it, but the main reason
    >why museums and other cramped public places don't want tripods is
    >that they don't want someone to trip on it.


    I was once using a mini-tripod with my F707 on the top of a wall
    surrounding a fountain. A security guard came up to me and said, "Sir,
    you can't use the tripod here". I asked him if he was sure I couldn't
    use the mini on top of the wall, because the reason for the tripod ban
    was probably related to people tripping over one standing on the ground.
    He said, "Sir, this is what I do for a living; I know the rules, and the
    rules are: no tripods here". I asked him what he would do if I came
    with a milk-crate full of bricks, with the camera mounted on top, to
    which he replied, "I wouldn't do anything, because that wouldn't be a
    tripod".
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
    , Aug 30, 2003
    #3
  4. Healthy Strong

    Lionel Guest

    Word has it that on 29 Aug 2003 18:47:57 -0700, in this august forum,
    (Samuel Paik) said:

    > (Healthy Strong) wrote:
    >> The problem is, this compact tripod just can't hold my telephoto lens
    >> camera good. Whenever I focus on the objects or players I want to take
    >> a shot and let that position stay, the camera slightly falls down and
    >> lose the objects on the sight. I tried to fix this problem but I just
    >> gave up.

    >
    >Basically, your goal is to try to get a stable platform for your
    >camera however you can, instead of suspending it in the air by your
    >arms.


    One trick I've used with heavy lenses is to rest the lens on the tripod,
    rather than screwing the camera body onto it. That works quite well with
    tripods that are way too light to be steady with a heavy camera & lens.
    You need to have a mounting plate that's well padded, or just put
    something soft on it to protect your lens body, like a glove or
    newspaper, etc.

    --
    W
    . | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
    \|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
    ---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
    Lionel, Aug 30, 2003
    #4
  5. Healthy Strong

    Ryan Li Guest

    In article <>,
    Healthy Strong <> wrote:
    > The problem is, this compact tripod just can't hold my telephoto lens
    > camera good. Whenever I focus on the objects or players I want to take
    > a shot and let that position stay, the camera slightly falls down and
    > lose the objects on the sight. I tried to fix this problem but I just
    > gave up.


    Are you using a tripod collar for your telephoto lens? If not, that might be
    the thing you want to look at next.

    --
    Ryan Li (replace no.spam with vzero.com to email)

    VZero Digital Photography [ http://vzero.com ]
    Weird Things In Video Games [ http://weird.vzero.com ]
    Ryan Li, Aug 30, 2003
    #5
  6. Healthy Strong

    David Grandy Guest

    First off I doubt very much that they will give you press accreditation just
    because you ask for it, so it's unlikely that you'll ever be let into the
    photographer's section at Yankee stadium. I would expect a letter from your
    editor and some proof that you are a pro would be required first.

    As fro your stability problem, the solution would be to use a monopod. It's
    not as stable as a tripod (duh) but it will allow you easier and more rapid
    movements than a tripod would. It might also be easier to get into the
    stadium.

    Baseball is a very difficult sport to photograph. Those pro's in the
    photographer's section are using VERY long and very fast lenses. Even with
    the digital conversion you'd get with the Canon 10D the shortest lens would
    be a 200 mm (300 effectively) and those guys would be using 300, 400 (both
    2.8's) or the 600 f4! It's a very long way to the pivot plays at second
    base. To shoot the pitcher a great location is from behind home plate -
    assuming you can get a seat! That way you can often get the ball in the air
    after he's let it go.
    David Grandy, Sep 4, 2003
    #6
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