Punctuation that Basks

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ben Dover, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. Ben Dover

    Ben Dover Guest

    Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some deep
    dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of the
    late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.

    <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>

    (Tele-macro mode, +2 diopter close-up filter stacked with a 1.7x
    teleconverter on a superzoom camera lens set to 432mm EFL, shot handheld.)

    As always, tiny downsized image and high jpg compression applied to
    entertain the thieves and resident trolls who are desperate for any glimpse
    of the real world beyond their mommies' basements.

    Interesting that the original downsized image for uploading is compressed
    to only 10.6k, but that Flickr runs it through compression again and gets
    48k out of it. That's one piss-poor algorithm they're using. All the better
    for my purposes.
     
    Ben Dover, Jul 28, 2010
    #1
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  2. Ben Dover

    Bruce Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    wrote:
    >Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some deep
    >dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of the
    >late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.
    >
    >http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg



    Beautiful lighting. A very nice shot. Thanks for posting.
     
    Bruce, Jul 28, 2010
    #2
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  3. Ben Dover

    Ben Dover Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >wrote:
    >>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some deep
    >>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of the
    >>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.
    >>
    >><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>

    >
    >
    >Beautiful lighting. A very nice shot. Thanks for posting.


    What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    "Angled-winged Butterfly Family").

    <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>

    I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the butterfly
    decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and angles
    as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses while
    watching its shadow.

    Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the wings
    it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.
     
    Ben Dover, Jul 28, 2010
    #3
  4. Ben Dover

    Bruce Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 05:28:10 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >>wrote:
    >>>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some deep
    >>>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of the
    >>>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.
    >>>
    >>><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>

    >>
    >>
    >>Beautiful lighting. A very nice shot. Thanks for posting.

    >
    >What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    >angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    >"Angled-winged Butterfly Family").
    >
    ><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>
    >
    >I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    >respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    >play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the butterfly
    >decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and angles
    >as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses while
    >watching its shadow.
    >
    >Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the wings
    >it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.



    Another very nice shot. I love the texture in the bark. I'm not
    entirely sure about the composition as I don't know what it was
    cropped from, or indeed whether it was cropped at all.
     
    Bruce, Jul 28, 2010
    #4
  5. Ben Dover

    DanP Guest

    On Jul 28, 11:28 am, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    > >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    > >wrote:
    > >>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some deep
    > >>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of the
    > >>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.

    >
    > >><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>

    >
    > >Beautiful lighting.  A very nice shot.  Thanks for posting.

    >
    > What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    > angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    > "Angled-winged Butterfly Family").
    >
    > <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>
    >
    > I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    > respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    > play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the butterfly
    > decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and angles
    > as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses while
    > watching its shadow.
    >
    > Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the wings
    > it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.


    First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    Try a square crop on it.

    The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    by the shadow too much.

    DanP
     
    DanP, Jul 28, 2010
    #5
  6. Ben Dover

    Ben Dover Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 04:22:41 -0700 (PDT), DanP <>
    wrote:

    >On Jul 28, 11:28 am, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    >> >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >> >wrote:
    >> >>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some deep
    >> >>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of the
    >> >>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.

    >>
    >> >><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>

    >>
    >> >Beautiful lighting.  A very nice shot.  Thanks for posting.

    >>
    >> What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    >> angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    >> "Angled-winged Butterfly Family").
    >>
    >> <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>
    >>
    >> I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    >> respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    >> play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the butterfly
    >> decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and angles
    >> as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses while
    >> watching its shadow.
    >>
    >> Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the wings
    >> it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.

    >
    >First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    >Try a square crop on it.
    >
    >The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    >by the shadow too much.
    >
    >DanP


    You know absolutely NOTHING about composition. If your own photography
    wasn't proof enough, thanks for proving it again.
     
    Ben Dover, Jul 28, 2010
    #6
  7. Ben Dover

    Tim Conway Guest

    "Ben Dover" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 04:22:41 -0700 (PDT), DanP <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Jul 28, 11:28 am, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    >>> >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >>> >wrote:
    >>> >>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some
    >>> >>deep
    >>> >>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of
    >>> >>the
    >>> >>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.
    >>>
    >>> >><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>
    >>>
    >>> >Beautiful lighting. A very nice shot. Thanks for posting.
    >>>
    >>> What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    >>> angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    >>> "Angled-winged Butterfly Family").
    >>>
    >>> <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>
    >>>
    >>> I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    >>> respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    >>> play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the
    >>> butterfly
    >>> decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and
    >>> angles
    >>> as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses
    >>> while
    >>> watching its shadow.
    >>>
    >>> Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the
    >>> wings
    >>> it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.

    >>
    >>First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    >>Try a square crop on it.
    >>
    >>The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    >>by the shadow too much.
    >>
    >>DanP

    >
    > You know absolutely NOTHING about composition. If your own photography
    > wasn't proof enough, thanks for proving it again.
    >

    And you know nothing about humanity.
     
    Tim Conway, Jul 28, 2010
    #7
  8. Ben Dover

    Ben Dover Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 11:59:17 -0400, "Tim Conway" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Ben Dover" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 04:22:41 -0700 (PDT), DanP <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Jul 28, 11:28 am, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    >>>> On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    >>>> >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >>>> >wrote:
    >>>> >>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some
    >>>> >>deep
    >>>> >>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of
    >>>> >>the
    >>>> >>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.
    >>>>
    >>>> >><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>
    >>>>
    >>>> >Beautiful lighting. A very nice shot. Thanks for posting.
    >>>>
    >>>> What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    >>>> angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    >>>> "Angled-winged Butterfly Family").
    >>>>
    >>>> <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>
    >>>>
    >>>> I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    >>>> respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    >>>> play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the
    >>>> butterfly
    >>>> decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and
    >>>> angles
    >>>> as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses
    >>>> while
    >>>> watching its shadow.
    >>>>
    >>>> Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the
    >>>> wings
    >>>> it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.
    >>>
    >>>First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    >>>Try a square crop on it.
    >>>
    >>>The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    >>>by the shadow too much.
    >>>
    >>>DanP

    >>
    >> You know absolutely NOTHING about composition. If your own photography
    >> wasn't proof enough, thanks for proving it again.
    >>

    >And you know nothing about humanity.


    I know enough to know that 99.9999% of humanity is a perfectly good waste
    of carbon atoms. You know, wastes like you.
     
    Ben Dover, Jul 28, 2010
    #8
  9. On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 11:59:17 -0400, Tim Conway wrote:

    >>>The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    >>>by the shadow too much.

    >>
    >> You know absolutely NOTHING about composition. If your own photography
    >> wasn't proof enough, thanks for proving it again.
    >>

    > And you know nothing about humanity.


    Did you expect anything else from the P&S troll?
    His social skills match his photography quite well, though.

    --
    Regards, Robert http://www.arumes.com
     
    Robert Spanjaard, Jul 28, 2010
    #9
  10. Ben Dover

    Ben Dover Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 18:12:39 +0200, Robert Spanjaard <>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 11:59:17 -0400, Tim Conway wrote:
    >
    >>>>The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    >>>>by the shadow too much.
    >>>
    >>> You know absolutely NOTHING about composition. If your own photography
    >>> wasn't proof enough, thanks for proving it again.
    >>>

    >> And you know nothing about humanity.

    >
    >Did you expect anything else from the P&S troll?
    >His social skills match his photography quite well, though.


    Should I expect anything less from the 99.9999% waste of carbon atoms like
    you?

    Nay, for then I would be disappointed.

    Show us all your compositional masterpieces.

    We all await with bated breath on why you are a virtuoso with your
    imaginary role-playing TROLL's cameras.
     
    Ben Dover, Jul 28, 2010
    #10
  11. Ben Dover

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 11:59:17 -0400, "Tim Conway" <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Ben Dover" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 04:22:41 -0700 (PDT), DanP <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Jul 28, 11:28 am, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    >>>>> On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    >>>>> >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >>>>> >wrote:
    >>>>> >>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some
    >>>>> >>deep
    >>>>> >>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of
    >>>>> >>the
    >>>>> >>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> >><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> >Beautiful lighting. A very nice shot. Thanks for posting.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    >>>>> angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    >>>>> "Angled-winged Butterfly Family").
    >>>>>
    >>>>> <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    >>>>> respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    >>>>> play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the
    >>>>> butterfly
    >>>>> decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and
    >>>>> angles
    >>>>> as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses
    >>>>> while
    >>>>> watching its shadow.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the
    >>>>> wings
    >>>>> it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.
    >>>>
    >>>>First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    >>>>Try a square crop on it.
    >>>>
    >>>>The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    >>>>by the shadow too much.
    >>>>
    >>>>DanP
    >>>
    >>> You know absolutely NOTHING about composition. If your own photography
    >>> wasn't proof enough, thanks for proving it again.
    >>>

    >>And you know nothing about humanity.

    >
    >I know enough to know that 99.9999% of humanity is a perfectly good waste
    >of carbon atoms. You know, wastes like you.


    And the remaining .0001% should have remained a shitstain on your dad's shorts


    >
    >
    >
     
    GMAN, Jul 28, 2010
    #11
  12. Ben Dover

    DanP Guest

    On Jul 28, 4:53 pm, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 04:22:41 -0700 (PDT), DanP <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Jul 28, 11:28 am, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    > >> On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    > >> >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    > >> >wrote:
    > >> >>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some deep
    > >> >>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of the
    > >> >>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.

    >
    > >> >><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>

    >
    > >> >Beautiful lighting.  A very nice shot.  Thanks for posting.

    >
    > >> What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    > >> angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    > >> "Angled-winged Butterfly Family").

    >
    > >> <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>

    >
    > >> I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    > >> respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    > >> play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the butterfly
    > >> decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and angles
    > >> as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses while
    > >> watching its shadow.

    >
    > >> Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the wings
    > >> it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.

    >
    > >First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    > >Try a square crop on it.

    >
    > >The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    > >by the shadow too much.

    >
    > >DanP

    >
    > You know absolutely NOTHING about composition. If your own photography
    > wasn't proof enough, thanks for proving it again.


    If you were serious abut photography you'd have an online portfolio.
    But you real hobby is pissing in the pool.

    DanP
     
    DanP, Jul 28, 2010
    #12
  13. Ben Dover

    tony cooper Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 04:22:41 -0700 (PDT), DanP <>
    wrote:

    >On Jul 28, 11:28 am, Ben Dover <> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 08:06:23 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    >> >On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:17:15 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >> >wrote:
    >> >>Find a small shaft of sunlight breaking through the canopy in some deep
    >> >>dark woods and you may find butterflies basking in the last rays of the
    >> >>late evening sun. A Comma butterfly doing just that.

    >>
    >> >><http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4113/4837011284_86f09633bd_b.jpg>

    >>
    >> >Beautiful lighting.  A very nice shot.  Thanks for posting.

    >>
    >> What about the lighting in this one, another basking pose and
    >> angle-composition theme (to reflect this representative of the
    >> "Angled-winged Butterfly Family").
    >>
    >> <http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4144/4837286834_9b6dd0bffb_b.jpg>
    >>
    >> I liked the way the dark cracks in the bark lead the eye to their
    >> respective subject/shadow counterparts. I have about a dozen of these to
    >> play with. I just couldn't decide (and it seems neither could the butterfly
    >> decide), just which shadow created the most interesting shapes and angles
    >> as it struck about a dozen different wing-angle and body-angle poses while
    >> watching its shadow.
    >>
    >> Though the high jpg-compression badly polka-dotted the colors in the wings
    >> it's the composition that I thought might be interesting.

    >
    >First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    >Try a square crop on it.


    A square crop would work, but not offer much in the way of
    improvement. Kinda iffy on square or rectangular on this one.

    >The second one has too much detail in the bark and my eye is atracted
    >by the shadow too much.
    >

    The best post-processing step for this shot would be to add a new
    layer over the image and fill that layer with a solid color, then
    flatten. This would solve the only thing wrong with the shot: bad
    photography.



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jul 28, 2010
    #13
  14. Ben Dover

    Shiva Das Guest

    In article <>,
    Ben Dover <> wrote:

    > Fubjvat rirelbar ntnva ubj zhpu lbh qba'g xabj nobhg cubgbtencul naq
    > pbzcbfvgvba. Gur qnex funqbj nernf va na vzntr ner rirel ovg nf vzcbegnag
    > nf gur yvg fhowrpg nernf va na vzntr. Gur rzcgl fcnpr va na vzntr whfg nf
    > vzcbegnag nf gubfr nernf jvgu qrgnvyf va gurz. V qbhog lbh'yy rire
    > pbzceruraq guvf. Lbh'ir cebirq lbhefrys gb or whfg nabgure bs gur uhaqerqf
    > bs glcvpny pencfubbgref naq ebyr-cynlvat gebyyf gung vasrfg gurfr
    > arjftebhcf.


    Wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank
    wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank
    wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank
    wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank
    wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank wank
    wank wank wank wank wank wank wank.
     
    Shiva Das, Jul 29, 2010
    #14
  15. Ben Dover

    Peter Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2010072814221164440-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...

    >
    > More, and more he reminds me of "Buffalo Bill" from "Silence of the
    > Lambs."
    >



    Don't criticize anyone until you've walked a mile in his shoes. By then
    you'll be a mile away and he'll be barefoot.

    --
    Peter
     
    Peter, Jul 29, 2010
    #15
  16. Ben Dover

    Peter Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:201007282049567987-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2010-07-28 20:18:34 -0700, "Peter" <> said:
    >
    >> "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    >> news:2010072814221164440-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    >>
    >>>
    >>> More, and more he reminds me of "Buffalo Bill" from "Silence of the
    >>> Lambs."
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Don't criticize anyone until you've walked a mile in his shoes. By then
    >> you'll be a mile away and he'll be barefoot.

    >
    > Only if he wears a 13D.
    >
    > I didn't criticize him, I just said he reminds me of the twisted, basement
    > lurking, moth collecting, solitary, serial killer, who skins his victims.


    Oh! :)

    > For now the character's nickname, "Buffalo Bill" seems an appropriate one
    > for our man of a 1000 pseudonyms.
    >
    > Where is FBI Agent Clarice Starling when we need her?
    >




    --
    Peter
     
    Peter, Jul 29, 2010
    #16
  17. Ben Dover

    tony cooper Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 18:54:50 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    wrote:

    >>>First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    >>>Try a square crop on it.

    >>
    >>A square crop would work, but not offer much in the way of
    >>improvement. Kinda iffy on square or rectangular on this one.

    >
    >A square composition would not work for this one. I knew that when I shot
    >it. Thanks for showing the whole world how little you know about
    >composition.


    Here's a squarish crop of a photograph I shot earlier today of a
    Four-Spotted Pennant dragonfly. Not a perfect square, but not in a
    standard rectangular ratio.


    http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/Current-Favorite-Shot/2010-07-28-001a/951118563_YFpsT-XL.jpg


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jul 29, 2010
    #17
  18. Ben Dover

    tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 00:07:18 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 00:54:09 -0400, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 18:54:50 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>>>First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    >>>>>Try a square crop on it.
    >>>>
    >>>>A square crop would work, but not offer much in the way of
    >>>>improvement. Kinda iffy on square or rectangular on this one.
    >>>
    >>>A square composition would not work for this one. I knew that when I shot
    >>>it. Thanks for showing the whole world how little you know about
    >>>composition.

    >>
    >>Here's a squarish crop of a photograph I shot earlier today of a
    >>Four-Spotted Pennant dragonfly. Not a perfect square, but not in a
    >>standard rectangular ratio.
    >>
    >>
    >>http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/Current-Favorite-Shot/2010-07-28-001a/951118563_YFpsT-XL.jpg

    >
    >Thanks. I was right. You don't know anything about decent composition.
    >Typical snapshooter, just center everything and hope it gets some praise
    >from those with equally poor artistic skills.
    >

    Your comment sheds a great deal of light on your lack of understanding
    of what composition is all about. You see a centered subject.
    However, the central points of focus for the viewer are the wing
    pairs. Neither of which is in the center of the image. The
    positioning of the dragonfly draws the eye from top right to lower
    left. Not even the darker mass is centered.

    You talk a good game, but that's what it is: all talk. The images
    you post - complete with your excuses of deliberate degradation -
    belie any thought that you understand composition.





    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jul 29, 2010
    #18
  19. Ben Dover

    Tim Conway Guest

    "Outing Trolls is FUN!" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 23:18:34 -0400, "Peter" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    >>news:2010072814221164440-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    >>
    >>>
    >>> More, and more he reminds me of "Buffalo Bill" from "Silence of the
    >>> Lambs."
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>Don't criticize anyone until you've walked a mile in his shoes. By then
    >>you'll be a mile away and he'll be barefoot.

    >
    > Poor conclusion. He wouldn't get two steps away before his life was
    > brought
    > to an abrupt ending. I've also lived barefoot for three years on a South
    > Pacific island. Hiking for hundreds of miles barefoot while living there,
    > while also carrying a 70 lb. backpack much of the time. 1 mile walked
    > barefoot is not a concern of any kind. One of my fun pastimes was to play
    > "mountain-goat" (while barefoot) and try to go everywhere the
    > mountain-goats went on the mile-high cliffs just to see if I could. A
    > skill
    > that came in handy for hunting them for food too.
    >
    > On the other hand, it IS safe to criticize resident trolls in newsgroups
    > that always hijack discussions for their own desperate need for attention
    > and their desperate need to belong anywhere.
    >
    > Thanks for proving again that that is all that you are and will precisely
    > ever be, a thread hijacking troll.
    >

    Wow, what a fiction writer you are.
     
    Tim Conway, Jul 29, 2010
    #19
  20. Ben Dover

    Tim Conway Guest

    "Ben Dover" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 01:29:41 -0400, tony cooper
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 00:07:18 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 00:54:09 -0400, tony cooper
    >>><> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 18:54:50 -0500, Ben Dover <>
    >>>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>>>First one is great, the shape of the wings is clear.
    >>>>>>>Try a square crop on it.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>A square crop would work, but not offer much in the way of
    >>>>>>improvement. Kinda iffy on square or rectangular on this one.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>A square composition would not work for this one. I knew that when I
    >>>>>shot
    >>>>>it. Thanks for showing the whole world how little you know about
    >>>>>composition.
    >>>>
    >>>>Here's a squarish crop of a photograph I shot earlier today of a
    >>>>Four-Spotted Pennant dragonfly. Not a perfect square, but not in a
    >>>>standard rectangular ratio.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/Current-Favorite-Shot/2010-07-28-001a/951118563_YFpsT-XL.jpg
    >>>
    >>>Thanks. I was right. You don't know anything about decent composition.
    >>>Typical snapshooter, just center everything and hope it gets some praise
    >>>from those with equally poor artistic skills.
    >>>

    >>Your comment sheds a great deal of light on your lack of understanding
    >>of what composition is all about. You see a centered subject.
    >>However, the central points of focus for the viewer are the wing
    >>pairs. Neither of which is in the center of the image. The
    >>positioning of the dragonfly draws the eye from top right to lower
    >>left. Not even the darker mass is centered.

    >
    > You have one huge X sitting smack dab in the center of your image, from
    > corner to corner, edge to edge. It bores the eyes and mind to tears when
    > looked at for more than 5 seconds. (The subject wholly unimpressive when I
    > have so many of those kinds of subjects myself.) The blurred too-shallow
    > DOF subject can't save that photo and the composition completely ruins
    > it--the one thing that you might have gotten away with (to partially save
    > it) if you knew anything at all about composition.
    >
    >>
    >>You talk a good game, but that's what it is: all talk. The images
    >>you post - complete with your excuses of deliberate degradation -
    >>belie any thought that you understand composition.

    >
    > Much of my fortune, upon which I retired at an early age, was from drawing
    > and painting. I apply those artistic skills to my photography too. You
    > know
    > not of what you speak. Your example, again, has made that more than
    > perfectly clear.
    >
    > Feel free to continue crying about it all you want. As I'm sure you will.
    >

    Yes indeed! What a fiction writer you are.
     
    Tim Conway, Jul 29, 2010
    #20
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