PS photo filters Sky 1A type

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by AAvK, Sep 24, 2006.

  1. AAvK

    AAvK Guest

    Sky filters, anti-blue hue for daylight shots.

    Noted* color names I have given relate to the color scale verticle
    in the middle of the color picker pallet, not the actual color as seen.

    Menu:
    Image/Adjustments/Photo Filter

    red-brown*:
    FFC1A2 r255 g193 b162 (20-30%)

    red-magenta*:
    FFA2CE r255 g162 b206 (15%)

    red-orange*:
    FFB6A2 r255 g182 b162 (30%)

    tan, strong:
    B87E39 r184 g126 b57 (20%)

    which is close to the

    sepia standard filter in PS CS:
    AC7A33 r172 g122 b51 (20%)

    Copy and paste into a text if anyone can use them because that
    pallet does not have a save option, at least in CS1. I cannot
    find anything on this subject anywhere online!

    Has anyone experimented with this idea? Or does anyone have
    other and possibly better ideas for sky filters?

    --
    }<)))*> Giant_Alex
    cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
    not my site: http://www.e-sword.net/
     
    AAvK, Sep 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. AAvK

    j Guest

    AAvK wrote:
    > Sky filters, anti-blue hue for daylight shots.
    >
    > Noted* color names I have given relate to the color scale verticle
    > in the middle of the color picker pallet, not the actual color as
    > seen. [...]
    > Has anyone experimented with this idea? Or does anyone have
    > other and possibly better ideas for sky filters?


    I cannot tell exactly what you are trying to achieve, but I will assume you
    want the effects with color images. CS2 has color filters under Adjustments.

    If you are applying the same to B&W, then it is best to go to the RGB
    channels to adjust colors.
     
    j, Sep 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. AAvK

    AAvK Guest


    > I cannot tell exactly what you are trying to achieve, but I will assume you
    > want the effects with color images. CS2 has color filters under Adjustments.
    >
    > If you are applying the same to B&W, then it is best to go to the RGB
    > channels to adjust colors.
    >
    >


    hhmmm... you don't know SLR photography? A sky filter is made of glass
    placed within a metal ring which threads into the front of a lens. The "sky"
    filters are strengths of "1A" and "1B".

    If shooting long distance against distant buildings and mountains, massive
    atmosphere between you and your subject, the atmosphere does us a sarcastic
    favor and gives a nasty blue hue to your film, or camera CCD/CMOS. And
    it comes out clearly in the resulting print/digital file.

    The sky filters correct this problem by giving a coloration which counteracts
    the blue hue. Concerning Photoshop, or digital graphics work in general, this
    photography issue isn't addressed anywhere online that I can find.

    --
    }<)))*> Giant_Alex
    cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
    not my site: http://www.e-sword.net/
     
    AAvK, Sep 25, 2006
    #3
  4. AAvK

    Mike Hyndman Guest

    "AAvK" <> wrote in message
    news:sNJRg.1120$ef2.588@fed1read09...
    >
    >> I cannot tell exactly what you are trying to achieve, but I will assume
    >> you want the effects with color images. CS2 has color filters under
    >> Adjustments.
    >>
    >> If you are applying the same to B&W, then it is best to go to the RGB
    >> channels to adjust colors.
    >>

    >
    > hhmmm... you don't know SLR photography? A sky filter is made of glass
    > placed within a metal ring which threads into the front of a lens. The
    > "sky" filters are strengths of "1A" and "1B".


    Why only "SLR" photography? Fixed lens cameras also suffer from the
    "problem" you describe.

    > If shooting long distance against distant buildings and mountains, massive
    > atmosphere between you and your subject, the atmosphere does us a
    > sarcastic favor and gives a nasty blue hue to your film, or camera
    > CCD/CMOS.


    Colour perspective /Spatial separation. The brain compensates, cameras
    don't.
    Have you tried shooting in RAW or with different white balances (cloudy in
    your example)?

    > And it comes out clearly in the resulting print/digital file.


    Shouldn't do if you are using PS correctly , adjustment layers etc.,
    >
    > The sky filters correct this problem by giving a coloration which
    > counteracts the blue hue. Concerning Photoshop, or digital graphics work
    > in general, this photography issue isn't addressed anywhere online that I
    > can find.


    Maybe this is because this form of correction is no longer the problem it
    used to be when using PS/digital cameras. The trouble with using any piece
    of glass in front of any optic is that it can introduce other problems, loss
    of quality, flare,etc., Also, any correction it provides is applied to the
    whole image, not always desirable. A "pink" filter used to correct a
    blue/hazey background will also affect foreground whites for example.With
    PS, you can apply any correction that a filter provides and you can apply it
    selectively, just to one part of an image or different strengths to
    different parts of the image.
    The only use for the aforementioned filters are to provide protection to the
    lens front element. Saying that, I use a circular polarizer on all my
    landscape shots, as I found that it is quicker to get the effect I want in
    camera, than post camera.

    MH
     
    Mike Hyndman, Sep 25, 2006
    #4
  5. AAvK

    Mike Russell Guest

    "AAvK" <> wrote in message
    news:sNJRg.1120$ef2.588@fed1read09...
    ....
    [re using Photoshop to get a Sky 1A filter effect]
    > The sky filters correct this problem by giving a coloration which
    > counteracts the blue hue. Concerning Photoshop, or digital graphics work
    > in general, this photography issue isn't addressed anywhere online that I
    > can find.


    The best book I've seen on this is Professional Photoshop by Dan Margulis.

    The overall haze is dealt with by setting a shadow point, and the blue cast
    would be fixed when setting a neutral, or other reference color, during a
    color correction. Blue haze in particular may be dealt with using a
    specific curve adjustment in the Blue channel. Digital offers several
    advantages over an optical filter: saturation may be increased, the amount
    of change can be varied according to the intensity of light, and the effect
    may be restricted to certain parts of the image using masks.

    If you have a particular image, perhaps you can make it available online.
    --
    Mike Russell
    www.curvemeister.com/forum/
     
    Mike Russell, Sep 25, 2006
    #5
  6. AAvK

    Mike Hyndman Guest

    "Mike Russell" <-MOVE> wrote in message
    news:Y2ORg.5259$...
    > "AAvK" <> wrote in message
    > news:sNJRg.1120$ef2.588@fed1read09...
    > ...
    > [re using Photoshop to get a Sky 1A filter effect]
    >> The sky filters correct this problem by giving a coloration which
    >> counteracts the blue hue. Concerning Photoshop, or digital graphics work
    >> in general, this photography issue isn't addressed anywhere online that I
    >> can find.

    >
    > The best book I've seen on this is Professional Photoshop by Dan Margulis.


    See also Photoshop Lab Color, The Canyon Conundrum....et al by the same
    author.

    MH
    >
    > The overall haze is dealt with by setting a shadow point, and the blue
    > cast would be fixed when setting a neutral, or other reference color,
    > during a color correction. Blue haze in particular may be dealt with
    > using a specific curve adjustment in the Blue channel. Digital offers
    > several advantages over an optical filter: saturation may be increased,
    > the amount of change can be varied according to the intensity of light,
    > and the effect may be restricted to certain parts of the image using
    > masks.
    >
    > If you have a particular image, perhaps you can make it available online.
    > --
    > Mike Russell
    > www.curvemeister.com/forum/
    >
    >
     
    Mike Hyndman, Sep 25, 2006
    #6
  7. AAvK

    j Guest

    "AAvK" <> wrote:

    > hhmmm... you don't know SLR photography?


    SLR photography is no different from any other.

    > If shooting long distance against distant buildings and mountains, massive
    > atmosphere between you and your subject, the atmosphere does us a
    > sarcastic favor and gives a nasty blue hue to your film, or camera
    > CCD/CMOS.


    The filters you mention have a mild effect upon the blue caused by
    light-scattering haze. They might have a very slight effect in apparent
    reduction of haze. As I wrote, CS2 has PhotoFilter adjustments to 'simulate'
    the color correction.
     
    j, Sep 25, 2006
    #7
  8. AAvK

    granny Guest

    Old N Slow:
    Granny <> typed:
    [snip]
    > I use a circular polarizer on
    > all my landscape shots, as I found that it is quicker to get the
    > effect I want in camera, than post camera.
    >
    > MH


    The Polarizer is almost a permanent fixture on my SLR... If I want
    "Pink" anywhere in particular or everywhere then it gets Photoshopped
    --
    "Granny"
    Old N Slow N Prefer Quick N Easy
     
    granny, Sep 25, 2006
    #8
  9. AAvK

    Mike Hyndman Guest

    "granny" <> wrote in message
    news:DuVRg.700$-kc.rr.com...
    > Old N Slow:
    > Granny <> typed:
    > [snip]
    >> I use a circular polarizer on
    >> all my landscape shots, as I found that it is quicker to get the
    >> effect I want in camera, than post camera.
    >>
    >> MH

    >
    > The Polarizer is almost a permanent fixture on my SLR... If I want "Pink"
    > anywhere in particular or everywhere then it gets Photoshopped


    Well said that Granny :)


    > --
    > "Granny"
    > Old N Slow N Prefer Quick N Easy

    ??

    prefer quick'n'dirty myself ;)

    MH
     
    Mike Hyndman, Sep 25, 2006
    #9
  10. AAvK

    granny Guest

    Old N Slow:
    Granny <> typed:
    [snip]

    >> If you have a particular image, perhaps you can make it available
    >> online. --
    >> Mike Russell
    >> www.curvemeister.com/forum/


    I am sure "Curvemeister" Mike has some pins that would be of help to
    you..

    the following is probably a cross post but I am gonna put it here
    anyway.. 'cause I don't know any better.. I am old and slow!.. and use
    Photoshop 7

    >
     
    granny, Sep 25, 2006
    #10
  11. AAvK

    tacit Guest

    In article <sNJRg.1120$ef2.588@fed1read09>,
    "AAvK" <> wrote:

    > The sky filters correct this problem by giving a coloration which counteracts
    > the blue hue. Concerning Photoshop, or digital graphics work in general,
    > this
    > photography issue isn't addressed anywhere online that I can find.


    Image->Adjust->Curves.

    Photoshop excels at extremely fine, extremely controllable color
    correction--that's one of the things it excels at. If you have a blue
    cast to your images, use the Curves command to get rid of it.

    --
    Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, literature, kink:
    all at http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
    Nanohazard, Geek shirts, and more: http://www.villaintees.com
     
    tacit, Sep 26, 2006
    #11
  12. AAvK

    j Guest

    One of the issues here is the reduction of haze in the original exposure.
    Adding a color filter after the fact is not the same as making a proper
    filtered exposure.
     
    j, Sep 28, 2006
    #12
  13. AAvK

    Mike Hyndman Guest

    "j" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > One of the issues here is the reduction of haze in the original exposure.
    > Adding a color filter after the fact is not the same as making a proper
    > filtered exposure.


    To correct your example, I wouldn't add a filter after the fact either, but
    employ (amongst other things) channel adjustments in LAB mode.
    Some of the problem regarding haze also used to be due to a particular films
    sensitivity (chemistry)to certain colours and its dynamic range, this is on
    longer the problem with modern CCD's.

    see Photoshop Lab Color, The Canyon Conundrum....by Dan Margulis.

    MH
     
    Mike Hyndman, Sep 28, 2006
    #13
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