Provider independent Hard VoIP phones?

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by smanage@gmail.com, Sep 27, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Hi,

    Are there "provider independent" hard voip phones that plug directly
    into a network router?

    Or, are there "provider independent" "VoIP conversion boxes" through
    which an ordinary telephone can be connected to a network router?

    Thanks in advance for the info.

    Cheers
    Suranga
    , Sep 27, 2005
    #1
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  2. Of course, actually, most hard voip phones and gateways (a more proper
    word for "voip conversion box" :) are provider independent, but most
    providers ship them preconfigured.

    Gateways I would recomend Cisco ATA 186, they work with major VoIP
    protocols, if you want a SIP only version but cheaper you can also try
    Linksys PAP2.
    http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/cc/pd/as/180/186/

    About hard voip phones I know only one but they worked fine, the Zultys
    ones:
    http://www.zultystechnologies.com/index.jsp?tab=product_list&type=phones

    Regards,
    Martin

    wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Are there "provider independent" hard voip phones that plug directly
    > into a network router?
    >
    > Or, are there "provider independent" "VoIP conversion boxes" through
    > which an ordinary telephone can be connected to a network router?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for the info.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Suranga
    >
    Martin E. Zulliger, Sep 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. Ivor Jones Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Are there "provider independent" hard voip phones that
    > plug directly into a network router?


    Most of them are, although many VoIP providers will pre-configure them to
    your account if you buy from them. Saves a lot of hassle..!

    > Or, are there "provider independent" "VoIP conversion
    > boxes" through which an ordinary telephone can be
    > connected to a network router?


    As above.

    Ivor
    Ivor Jones, Sep 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Hi Martin, Ivor,

    Thanks for the detailed explanations. I already have a spare phone, so
    I will be opting to buy a "VoIP gateway".

    Cheers
    Suranga
    , Sep 29, 2005
    #4
  5. Ivor Jones Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:
    > Hi Martin, Ivor,
    >
    > Thanks for the detailed explanations. I already have a
    > spare phone, so I will be opting to buy a "VoIP gateway".
    >
    > Cheers
    > Suranga


    Correct term is ATA (Analogue Telephone Adaptor) :)

    Ivor
    Ivor Jones, Sep 29, 2005
    #5
  6. Ivor Jones wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:
    >
    >>Hi Martin, Ivor,
    >>
    >>Thanks for the detailed explanations. I already have a
    >>spare phone, so I will be opting to buy a "VoIP gateway".
    >>
    >>Cheers
    >>Suranga

    >
    >
    > Correct term is ATA (Analogue Telephone Adaptor) :)

    Well that's so relative, ATA is not very generalized, each company calls
    it in a different way. For example Cisco calls them "ATA" (Analog
    Telephone Adaptor) however Oki calls them BMG (Broadband Media Gateway)
    and Vegasteam calls them VoIP Gateway (they're smart :). I still stick
    with the "VoIP gateway" since by definition, a gateway translates from
    one "coding" to another, in this case from analog audio to packets over
    the wire... Yeah I know you will say "maybe you would have to say analog
    audio-voip gateway" or something like that but I still like the word
    Gateway :).

    Martin
    Martin E. Zulliger, Sep 29, 2005
    #6
  7. Kyler Laird Guest

    "Martin E. Zulliger" <> writes:

    >> Correct term is ATA (Analogue Telephone Adaptor) :)

    >Well that's so relative, ATA is not very generalized, each company calls
    >it in a different way.


    Isn't "FXO" the universal term?

    --kyler
    Kyler Laird, Sep 30, 2005
    #7
  8. Kyler Laird wrote:
    > "Martin E. Zulliger" <> writes:
    >
    >
    >>>Correct term is ATA (Analogue Telephone Adaptor) :)

    >>
    >>Well that's so relative, ATA is not very generalized, each company calls
    >>it in a different way.

    >
    >
    > Isn't "FXO" the universal term?
    >
    > --kyler

    Nope, FXO and FXS are types of VoIP gateways. FXO Gateways are the ones
    who receive the phone line (so you can place calls from VoIP to POTS),
    so they "receive the line current" (electrically, behaving as a phone,
    kinda) and then you have FXS where you plug a normal phone to make
    calls, they "provide the line current" (electrically, they behave as a
    PBX/phone central). However not all VoIP gateways are either FXS or FXO,
    since you have trunk VoIP gateways also (they have E1s/T1s and
    interconnect with VoIP, though both systems are digital, their protocols
    are different, well also the multiplexing and so on, Im not gonna go
    into details :). Also you have things like GSM/VoIP gateways and so on.

    Martin
    Martin E. Zulliger, Sep 30, 2005
    #8
  9. Miguel Cruz Guest

    Kyler Laird <> wrote:
    > "Martin E. Zulliger" <> writes:
    >>> Correct term is ATA (Analogue Telephone Adaptor) :)

    >>
    >> Well that's so relative, ATA is not very generalized, each company calls
    >> it in a different way.

    >
    > Isn't "FXO" the universal term?


    Well, it provides an FXS interface but I wouldn't say that's a great term
    for what it IS. An air conditioner provides cool air but it is not called a
    "cool air". Or an air-temperature gateway, for that matter.

    miguel
    --
    Hit The Road! Photos from 36 countries on 5 continents: http://travel.u.nu
    Latest photos: Queens Day in Amsterdam; the Grand Canyon; Amman, Jordan
    Miguel Cruz, Sep 30, 2005
    #9
  10. > Are there "provider independent" hard voip phones that plug directly
    > into a network router?


    You can also get a box which combines the ATA with a router.
    This is useful for somebody who has a single public IP address
    from their cable/DSL provider. You plug one Ethernet to the outside
    and the other Ethernet to your domestic LAN.

    The box is a DHCP client to the ISP and a DHCP server to
    your domestic PCs.

    That would be the Sipura 2100.

    -Ramon
    Ramon F Herrera, Sep 30, 2005
    #10
  11. > Isn't "FXO" the universal term?

    Let's say you have an ATA which provides an FXS and an FXO port,
    such as the Sipura 3000. Take a voltmeter and measure the voltage on
    both ports. The FXS has some low voltage (dial tone) and the FXO
    port has 0 volts.

    If you happen to measure during a ring the voltage goes to some 60
    volts.

    -Ramon
    Ramon F Herrera, Sep 30, 2005
    #11
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