Protecting your home computer

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Joe Bloggs, Aug 20, 2003.

  1. Joe Bloggs

    Joe Bloggs Guest

    Just a short message to say that if you're not an 'expert', you might want
    to look at http://www.microsoft.com/protect

    This web page has basically the same information as the textual steps below,
    just a little more detail and some pictures that help.
    Have a browse around the site - there's also a good section for Home Users
    that have some good articles.

    > Below is a summary of how to protect your computer better from this and
    > other viruses/worms. This information is from the
    > http://www.microsoft.com/security/ web site.
    >
    > For more specific information on the blaster worm see
    > http://www.microsoft.com/security/incident/blast.asp - it includes steps

    on
    > how to remove the virus.
    >
    >
    > __________________________________________________________________________
    >
    > Here is what to do to get protected and stay protected.
    >
    >
    >
    > 1. First, turn on the Internet Connection Firewall in Windows XP.

    Having
    > the firewall activated will protect your computer from this security issue
    > as well as many many others. Even if your computer has already been
    > infected, activating firewall software will help limit the effects of the
    > worm on your computer.
    >
    >
    >
    > The fine print: If you have multiple machines, you should use the Home
    > network configuration wizard. In the multiple machine case only the
    > Internet facing computer (the computer attached to the Internet directly

    and
    > not the other computers in the home that sharing the Internet connection)
    > should have the firewall enabled via the instructions below. Please note
    > that the firewall can disable some internet software, services and

    features.
    > However, if this happens you can selectively correct these issues by
    > adjusting how the firewall works. For the vast majority of users this
    > change will be totally transparent. Your email and browsing experience

    for
    > example should not be impacted in any way. In some cases you may have to
    > "open a port" for a feature to work. I don't describe how to alter those
    > secondary settings here. If you run servers in your house, etc., then

    you
    > are technical enough that this message isn't intented for you. If you
    > experience any changes to your internet software, services or features,
    > please call 1-866-PCSAFETY if you can't figure it out or check our web

    site
    > for more information.
    >
    >
    >
    > The instructions:
    >
    > 1. Open Network Connections (Click Start, click Control Panel, and

    then
    > double-click Network Connections.)
    >
    > 2. Click to select the Dial-up, LAN or High-Speed Internet connection
    > that you want to protect.
    >
    > 3. In the task pane on the left, under Network Tasks, click Change
    > settings of this connection.
    > (Or, within the Network Connections folder, right-click on the connection
    > that you want to protect and then click Properties.)
    >
    > 4. On the Advanced tab, under Internet Connection Firewall, select the
    > Protect my computer and network by limiting or preventing access to this
    > computer from the Internet check box.
    >
    > If you are not running Windows XP, you will need to install a third-party
    > firewall. Most firewall software for home users is available in free or
    > trial versions. Check the following resources for more information on
    > personal firewalls:
    >
    > o ZoneAlarm Pro
    >

    (http://www.zonelabs.com/store/content/catalog/products/zap/zap_details.jsp)
    >
    > o Tiny Personal Firewall
    > (http://www.tinysoftware.com/home/tiny2?la=EN)
    >
    > o Outpost Firewall
    > (http://www.agnitum.com/download/outpostfree.html)
    >
    > o Kerio Personal Firewall
    > (http://www.kerio.com/us/kpf_download.html)
    >
    > o BlackICE PC Protection
    > (http://blackice.iss.net/product_pc_protection.php)
    >
    >
    >
    > 2. Second, configure AutoUpdate for Windows Update for Windows XP. While
    > your computer is connected to the Internet, the Automatic Updates feature

    in
    > Windows XP looks for updates and downloads any that are available. By

    using
    > the scheduled downloads feature, you will automate the essential second

    step
    > of actually installing the updates once they are downloaded (and not see
    > those pop-up balloon reminders).
    >
    > 1. Open System Properties (Click Start, click Control Panel, click
    > Performance and Maintenance, click the System icon to open the System
    > Properties dialogue box. (If the Performance and Maintenance category is
    > not visible, click Switch to Category View under Control Panel on the left
    > side of the Control Panel window)
    >
    > 2. Click the Automatic Updates tab. If the check box next to Keep my
    > computer up to date is clear, click it to select it.
    >
    > 3. Schedule Regular Installs. On the Automatic Updates tab, under
    > Settings, click Automatically download the updates, and install them on

    the
    > schedule that I specify. From the lists provided, select a day and time

    for
    > your computer to install downloaded updates. Be sure to pick a day and

    time
    > when your computer is usually turned on.
    >
    > 4. Click OK to apply your changes and close the dialog box.
    >
    > If you are not running Windows XP, you can still use Windows Update. More
    > information on downloading updates can be found at
    > www.microsoft.com/security
    >
    >
    >
    > 3. Third, use antivirus software and make sure you have the latest

    updates
    > installed. These software packages can help you deal with attacks of
    > different forms (e.g., email viruses).
    >
    > · If you already have antivirus software installed, go to your
    > antivirus vendor's Web site to get the latest updates, also known as virus
    > definitions.
    >
    > · If you do not have antivirus software installed, then you should
    > consider getting it. The following vendors participating in the Microsoft
    > Virus Information Alliance (VIA) offer antivirus products for home users:
    >
    > o Network Associates

    (http://us.mcafee.com/root/catalog.asp?catid=av)
    >
    > o Trend Micro
    >

    (http://www.trendmicro.com/en/products/desktop/pc-cillin/evaluate/overview.h
    > tm)
    >
    > o Symantec (http://www.symantec.com/product/index_homecomp.html)
    >
    >
    Joe Bloggs, Aug 20, 2003
    #1
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  2. Joe Bloggs

    Rider Guest

    "Joe Bloggs" <> wrote in message
    news:NpC0b.15403$...
    > Just a short message to say that if you're not an 'expert', you might want
    > to look at http://www.microsoft.com/protect
    >


    Easiest way for "end users" to protect themselves, and not screw up their
    computers ......

    DONT TURN IT ON!!!!!!

    :)
    Rider, Aug 20, 2003
    #2
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