Protecting the lens

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Freedom55, May 7, 2006.

  1. Freedom55

    Freedom55 Guest

    Anyone use an UV filter to protect the lens? And does using such a
    filter effect the F stop on a DSLR and fool the electronics? May sound
    like a pretty basic question, sorry!

    Ron
    --
    And it really doesn't matter if
    I'm wrong I'm right
    Where I belong I'm right
    Where I belong.

    Lennon & McCartney
     
    Freedom55, May 7, 2006
    #1
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  2. Freedom55

    Guest

    A large proportion of SLR users lace the front of their lenses with a
    permanently-fixed cover. Most people use UV, Skylights or simply blank
    plates of glass.

    UVs filter out UV radiation from entering the lens, which is supposed
    to make some kind of difference, but I've never noticed it. Skylights
    are like UVs but have a very slight red tint to them, which is only
    visible if you put it against a white sheet of paper. Alters the colour
    ever so slightly. A blank plate of glass is just a blank plate of
    glass. :)

    All are factor 0, which means that they do not alter the amount of
    light entering the lens by any perceptible amount (typically they let
    through 98%-100% of available light as compared to a naked lens).

    Technically speaking, extra layers of glass alter the optical quality
    of the final image. A filter is an extra layer of glass. But
    personally, I think you'd need to have the most discerning of eyes to
    see the difference in raw image quality between a filtered and
    unfiltered image if the filter is half decent.

    The benefits of having a filter were very real to me when I made the
    mistake of getting accidently inebriated while shooting in Barcelona,
    and the resultant clumsiness ended up in one of my expensive lenses
    hitting a table. The filter shattered and got destroyed. The lens?
    Fine. I don't know how much actual impact the filter took, but it was
    assurance enough to make me promise myself to always have a filter on.

    Also, every three years I get new filters for all my glass. Why? They
    get pretty scratched up - scratches that would have been elsewhere had
    the filter not been on as a photographer's ozone layer.
     
    , May 7, 2006
    #2
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  3. Freedom55

    Freedom55 Guest

    wrote:
    > A large proportion of SLR users lace the front of their lenses with a
    > permanently-fixed cover. Most people use UV, Skylights or simply blank
    > plates of glass.
    >
    > UVs filter out UV radiation from entering the lens, which is supposed
    > to make some kind of difference, but I've never noticed it. Skylights
    > are like UVs but have a very slight red tint to them, which is only
    > visible if you put it against a white sheet of paper. Alters the colour
    > ever so slightly. A blank plate of glass is just a blank plate of
    > glass. :)
    >
    > All are factor 0, which means that they do not alter the amount of
    > light entering the lens by any perceptible amount (typically they let
    > through 98%-100% of available light as compared to a naked lens).
    >
    > Technically speaking, extra layers of glass alter the optical quality
    > of the final image. A filter is an extra layer of glass. But
    > personally, I think you'd need to have the most discerning of eyes to
    > see the difference in raw image quality between a filtered and
    > unfiltered image if the filter is half decent.
    >
    > The benefits of having a filter were very real to me when I made the
    > mistake of getting accidently inebriated while shooting in Barcelona,
    > and the resultant clumsiness ended up in one of my expensive lenses
    > hitting a table. The filter shattered and got destroyed. The lens?
    > Fine. I don't know how much actual impact the filter took, but it was
    > assurance enough to make me promise myself to always have a filter on.
    >
    > Also, every three years I get new filters for all my glass. Why? They
    > get pretty scratched up - scratches that would have been elsewhere had
    > the filter not been on as a photographer's ozone layer.
    >

    Very comforting response. This is my first venture with a DSLR (the
    E-500 BTW) and I want to protect my investment for as long as possible.
    Thanks.

    Ron

    --
    And it really doesn't matter if
    I'm wrong I'm right
    Where I belong I'm right
    Where I belong.

    Lennon & McCartney
     
    Freedom55, May 7, 2006
    #3
  4. Freedom55

    Rutger Guest

    "Freedom55" <"joinertake this out"@ns.sympatico.ca> schreef in bericht
    news:nXk7g.4296$...
    > Anyone use an UV filter to protect the lens? And does using such a filter
    > effect the F stop on a DSLR and fool the electronics? May sound like a
    > pretty basic question, sorry!
    >


    Basics are ok.
    I use it on all of my lenses. Better to change a scratched filter than the
    front lens.

    Rutger

    --
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/zwaarddrager/
     
    Rutger, May 7, 2006
    #4
  5. Freedom55

    Don Stauffer Guest

    Freedom55 wrote:
    > Anyone use an UV filter to protect the lens? And does using such a
    > filter effect the F stop on a DSLR and fool the electronics? May sound
    > like a pretty basic question, sorry!
    >
    > Ron


    Yes and no. Most DSLRs use through the lens metering, so they already
    account for the loss.

    Even for P & S, the amount of light lost in a good filter of this type
    is such a small fraction of a stop that the metering is still okay. Keep
    in mind that silicon detectors, as used in a digicam, are not very
    sensitive to UV anyway, but they are cheap, so might as well use the,
    especially for scenery pics where you are shooting a lot of sky.
     
    Don Stauffer, May 7, 2006
    #5
  6. Freedom55

    Pat Guest

    For everyday use, filters are a must. If they get scratched or dirty,
    then it's better that they do than the lens, itself. And, as
    mentioned, they are disposable.

    OTOH, when I pull out the good glass for more serious shooting, the
    filter comes off. But I know that and act accordingly.
     
    Pat, May 7, 2006
    #6
  7. Freedom55

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Sun, 07 May 2006 10:15:26 -0500, Don Stauffer
    <> wrote:

    >Freedom55 wrote:
    >> Anyone use an UV filter to protect the lens? And does using such a
    >> filter effect the F stop on a DSLR and fool the electronics? May sound
    >> like a pretty basic question, sorry!
    >>
    >> Ron

    >
    >Yes and no. Most DSLRs use through the lens metering, so they already
    >account for the loss.
    >
    >Even for P & S, the amount of light lost in a good filter of this type
    >is such a small fraction of a stop that the metering is still okay. Keep
    >in mind that silicon detectors, as used in a digicam, are not very
    >sensitive to UV anyway, but they are cheap, so might as well use the,
    >especially for scenery pics where you are shooting a lot of sky.


    So far, I've not seen any evidence that a UV filter affects a digital
    camera's images at all.
    Maybe I'be missed it? Can anyone poijt ot a link that shows an example
    of a UV filter affecting digital cameras' images?
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, May 7, 2006
    #7
  8. Freedom55

    Mike Fields Guest

    "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 07 May 2006 10:15:26 -0500, Don Stauffer
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Freedom55 wrote:
    >>> Anyone use an UV filter to protect the lens? And does using such a
    >>> filter effect the F stop on a DSLR and fool the electronics? May
    >>> sound
    >>> like a pretty basic question, sorry!
    >>>
    >>> Ron

    >>
    >>Yes and no. Most DSLRs use through the lens metering, so they already
    >>account for the loss.
    >>
    >>Even for P & S, the amount of light lost in a good filter of this type
    >>is such a small fraction of a stop that the metering is still okay.
    >>Keep
    >>in mind that silicon detectors, as used in a digicam, are not very
    >>sensitive to UV anyway, but they are cheap, so might as well use the,
    >>especially for scenery pics where you are shooting a lot of sky.

    >
    > So far, I've not seen any evidence that a UV filter affects a digital
    > camera's images at all.
    > Maybe I'be missed it? Can anyone poijt ot a link that shows an example
    > of a UV filter affecting digital cameras' images?
    > --
    > Bill Funk
    > replace "g" with "a"


    I have not experimented much with it, but where it showed up with
    film was at higher elevations. Normal elevations, the pictures looked
    about the same, but when you got up to 5,000 feet or above, there
    was a noticeable difference with film anyway (sort of a haze that you
    would see). Maybe the uv "haze" is lost in the "purple fringing" ?? ;-)

    mikey
     
    Mike Fields, May 7, 2006
    #8
  9. Freedom55

    Pat Guest

    Sure there's proof. Check the earlier post from @rudicheow. The next
    picture after the drunken accident would look very different if not for
    the filter. It may not be the proof that you're looking for, but it's
    proof that the filter had an "impact" !
     
    Pat, May 7, 2006
    #9
  10. "Pat" <> wrote:

    > For everyday use, filters are a must.


    It depends on the usage of the camera. A decent
    lens hood does a good job too to protect the
    lens.

    Andreas

    --
    http://www.subworld.at
     
    Andreas Thaler, May 7, 2006
    #10
  11. Pat wrote:
    > For everyday use, filters are a must. If they get scratched or dirty,
    > then it's better that they do than the lens, itself. And, as
    > mentioned, they are disposable.


    I believe lens hoods provide more protection than filters, so I almost
    am never without a hood when the lens is out of the bag. I also have
    filters on most of my lenses, as much to ease the thought of cleaning
    without worrying about a piece of grit getting between my hand and the
    lens coating(s).

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, May 7, 2006
    #11
  12. Freedom55

    dwight Guest

    "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Pat wrote:
    >> For everyday use, filters are a must. If they get scratched or dirty,
    >> then it's better that they do than the lens, itself. And, as
    >> mentioned, they are disposable.

    >
    > I believe lens hoods provide more protection than filters, so I almost am
    > never without a hood when the lens is out of the bag. I also have filters
    > on most of my lenses, as much to ease the thought of cleaning without
    > worrying about a piece of grit getting between my hand and the lens
    > coating(s).
    >
    > --
    > John McWilliams


    I'm with you, John. Just bought the first new lens for my XT, and springing
    for a UV filter and lens hood was a no brainer. Double protection, triple
    when I put on my kid gloves to hold the camera.

    dwight
     
    dwight, May 8, 2006
    #12
  13. Freedom55

    Don Stauffer Guest

    Bill Funk wrote:

    >
    > So far, I've not seen any evidence that a UV filter affects a digital
    > camera's images at all.
    > Maybe I'be missed it? Can anyone poijt ot a link that shows an example
    > of a UV filter affecting digital cameras' images?


    You get about a 6-10% light loss, which is a fraction of an f-stop, so
    that shouldn't really hurt. The coating is likely to add a few percent
    additional even in passband, but again that much will not affect
    exposure much.

    A good lens should be flat and polished, and the coating if done right
    should have very little effect optically as far as degrading image. One
    problem is that sometimes we get complacent, knowing the filter is there
    to protect lens. We neglect to keep the FILTER clean enough. Whether
    it is on lens or filter, dust and scratches DO affect image quality. So
    keep them clean, but clean them as you would a lens, since the coatings
    on filters are closely related to coatings on lens.
     
    Don Stauffer, May 8, 2006
    #13
  14. Freedom55

    Don Stauffer Guest

    John McWilliams wrote:
    > Pat wrote:
    >
    >> For everyday use, filters are a must. If they get scratched or dirty,
    >> then it's better that they do than the lens, itself. And, as
    >> mentioned, they are disposable.

    >
    >
    > I believe lens hoods provide more protection than filters, so I almost
    > am never without a hood when the lens is out of the bag. I also have
    > filters on most of my lenses, as much to ease the thought of cleaning
    > without worrying about a piece of grit getting between my hand and the
    > lens coating(s).
    >
    > --
    > John McWilliams

    But what about IN bag? We have to turn our hood around to get the
    camera in bag. During handling we are afraid the lens could continually
    brush against fabric of bag liner, so we leave UV filter on while camera
    is in bag.
     
    Don Stauffer, May 8, 2006
    #14
  15. Freedom55

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Mon, 08 May 2006 08:34:18 -0500, Don Stauffer
    <> wrote:

    >John McWilliams wrote:
    >> Pat wrote:
    >>
    >>> For everyday use, filters are a must. If they get scratched or dirty,
    >>> then it's better that they do than the lens, itself. And, as
    >>> mentioned, they are disposable.

    >>
    >>
    >> I believe lens hoods provide more protection than filters, so I almost
    >> am never without a hood when the lens is out of the bag. I also have
    >> filters on most of my lenses, as much to ease the thought of cleaning
    >> without worrying about a piece of grit getting between my hand and the
    >> lens coating(s).
    >>
    >> --
    >> John McWilliams

    >But what about IN bag? We have to turn our hood around to get the
    >camera in bag. During handling we are afraid the lens could continually
    >brush against fabric of bag liner, so we leave UV filter on while camera
    >is in bag.


    I don't use hoods, but I keep the lens cap on unless the lens is on
    the camera, and actually being used.
    So, in the bag, the lens cap is always on the lens.
    That's how I do it.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, May 8, 2006
    #15
  16. Freedom55

    Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Mon, 08 May 2006 09:09:37 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:

    > On Mon, 08 May 2006 08:34:18 -0500, Don Stauffer
    > <> wrote:


    > I don't use hoods, but I keep the lens cap on unless the lens is on
    > the camera, and actually being used.
    > So, in the bag, the lens cap is always on the lens.
    > That's how I do it.

    That is my way too- for over 45 years.
    --
    Neil
    Delete 'l' to reply
     
    Neil Ellwood, May 8, 2006
    #16
  17. Neil Ellwood wrote:
    > On Mon, 08 May 2006 09:09:37 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 08 May 2006 08:34:18 -0500, Don Stauffer
    >> <> wrote:

    >
    >> I don't use hoods, but I keep the lens cap on unless the lens is on
    >> the camera, and actually being used.
    >> So, in the bag, the lens cap is always on the lens.
    >> That's how I do it.

    > That is my way too- for over 45 years.


    I use lens caps only when I am packing up for a real trip. And then not
    consistently. They are about useless to me, as when I have them on, the
    camera is already protected. And when the cap is on, I have to remove it
    at the most awkward time, and then stick it in a pocket. The dangly
    thing blows about in wind and for me, is worse than losing it.

    So a hood is the most useful for protecting against bangs at the outer
    edges, as well as straight on; YMMV. Sometimes I leave them in place in
    my camera bag, although not on the 70-200; it's just too long.

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, May 8, 2006
    #17
  18. John McWilliams <> wrote:

    : I use lens caps only when I am packing up for a real trip. And then not
    : consistently. They are about useless to me, as when I have them on, the
    : camera is already protected. And when the cap is on, I have to remove it
    : at the most awkward time, and then stick it in a pocket. The dangly
    : thing blows about in wind and for me, is worse than losing it.

    I used to have that proplem too. But I recently found a solution. There
    are hinged lens caps available. The ones I got from B&H are made by
    Op/Tech (tho your manufacturer and seller are up to you). I found them
    under "Other filter accessories". There are two types. One kind simply
    screws into the filter threads. The other mounts between a filter and the
    lens (and thus most useful to those of us who use a "lens protector
    filter") and leaves the filter threads available for use. These caps are
    hinged and spring loaded so all it takes is a flip of the finger to pop it
    open, and when you close them they seal very good. And since the hinge and
    spring keep them solidly attached to the lens you don't have something
    dangling and blowing in the wind (at least not on your camera). :) When in
    the open position they are about 180 deg open and so there is no problem
    with the cap getting into even a very wide angle image. These caps are
    specific to a filter size.

    So far I am very pleased with mine.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, May 11, 2006
    #18
  19. Freedom55

    Freedom55 Guest

    Randy Berbaum wrote:
    > John McWilliams <> wrote:
    >
    > : I use lens caps only when I am packing up for a real trip. And then not
    > : consistently. They are about useless to me, as when I have them on, the
    > : camera is already protected. And when the cap is on, I have to remove it
    > : at the most awkward time, and then stick it in a pocket. The dangly
    > : thing blows about in wind and for me, is worse than losing it.
    >
    > I used to have that proplem too. But I recently found a solution. There
    > are hinged lens caps available. The ones I got from B&H are made by
    > Op/Tech (tho your manufacturer and seller are up to you). I found them
    > under "Other filter accessories". There are two types. One kind simply
    > screws into the filter threads. The other mounts between a filter and the
    > lens (and thus most useful to those of us who use a "lens protector
    > filter") and leaves the filter threads available for use. These caps are
    > hinged and spring loaded so all it takes is a flip of the finger to pop it
    > open, and when you close them they seal very good. And since the hinge and
    > spring keep them solidly attached to the lens you don't have something
    > dangling and blowing in the wind (at least not on your camera). :) When in
    > the open position they are about 180 deg open and so there is no problem
    > with the cap getting into even a very wide angle image. These caps are
    > specific to a filter size.
    >
    > So far I am very pleased with mine.
    >
    > Randy
    >
    > ==========
    > Randy Berbaum
    > Champaign, IL
    >
    >

    Got a link Randy?

    Ron

    --
    And it really doesn't matter if
    I'm wrong I'm right
    Where I belong I'm right
    Where I belong.

    Lennon & McCartney
     
    Freedom55, May 11, 2006
    #19
  20. Freedom55 <"joinertake this out"@ns.sympatico.ca> wrote:

    : Got a link Randy?

    My news reader doesn't allow me to copy a link but here's the info that
    can get you there.

    www.bhphotovideo.com

    select "Filters & Accessories"
    Under Filter Accessories select "Other Filter Accessories"
    And then refine results to "Op/Tech"

    This will give you a listing of all these filter held caps for the various
    filter sizes.

    As always the descriptions I am pointing out are for illustration of what
    is available and it is up to you if you wish to find them at another
    seller. I have no connection to B&H beyond being a customer.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, May 12, 2006
    #20
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