Project CHaOS

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 25, 2006.

  1. You might have seen the items on today's evening news (both channels, I
    think) on this new pilot program for more computer-intensive learning by
    children in schools.

    Turns out it's called "Project ChaOS"
    <http://www.digiops.org.nz/projects/currentprojects/chaos/>, which stands
    for "Children Have Ownership of Schooling". Great idea in principle, but I
    can't help being worried about their reliance on particular
    technologies--tablet PCs and PDAs--that 1) are expensive, and 2) have,
    shall we say, less than rosy prospects for the future?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 25, 2006
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Lawrence D'Oliveiro,

    iirc, there are several 'CHAOS' type projects up and running in some of the
    more athluent parts of the states, personally i think it is a great idea.

    > have, shall we say, less than rosy prospects for the future?


    are you referring to TPC & PDA's themselvs or the software that typically
    runs on them ?

    if its the software that typically runs on them - who cares. the fact is
    that you can learn on one system and most of your skills are portable to
    other systems. the way you use a stylus is the same, its just the software
    itself that is different.

    that is of course unless you learned on a Apple and trying to port them skills
    to PC - im not trying to take a swipe at apple owners, just that some i know
    have real 'issues' when trying to use a PC.

    ----------------
    the madGeek

    > You might have seen the items on today's evening news (both channels,
    > I think) on this new pilot program for more computer-intensive
    > learning by children in schools.
    >
    > Turns out it's called "Project ChaOS"
    > <http://www.digiops.org.nz/projects/currentprojects/chaos/>, which
    > stands for "Children Have Ownership of Schooling". Great idea in
    > principle, but I can't help being worried about their reliance on
    > particular technologies--tablet PCs and PDAs--that 1) are expensive,
    > and 2) have, shall we say, less than rosy prospects for the future?
    >
     
    Steven H, Jul 25, 2006
    #2
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  3. T'was the Tue, 25 Jul 2006 20:18:38 +1200 when I remembered Lawrence
    D'Oliveiro <_zealand> saying something like
    this:

    >Turns out it's called "Project ChaOS"
    ><http://www.digiops.org.nz/projects/currentprojects/chaos/>, which stands
    >for "Children Have Ownership of Schooling". Great idea in principle, but I
    >can't help being worried about their reliance on particular
    >technologies--tablet PCs and PDAs--that 1) are expensive, and 2) have,
    >shall we say, less than rosy prospects for the future?


    I used to work for the Ministry of Education as part of their ICT
    Professional Development Clusters. There has been quite a few ICT
    initiatives that I saw, such as Laptop Valley, Nayland College, CCNA
    in schools, Video conferencing, etc...

    I was always disappointed at all these high technology solutions being
    put into schools without any thought towards whether there were more
    cost-effective solutions than just what the vendors were coming up
    with.

    One idea I wanted to see was the purchase of cheap PDAs such as the
    low end Palms that could interface with data-loggers. That would
    really make sciences such as biology a lot more useful and
    interactive.

    Another idea was using digital cameras in primary schools. Instead of
    getting one or two 6MP cameras worth $600 or so, why not get 4 $150
    4MP cameras from DSE? It's not like the primary school students are
    doing digital photography, and I always felt that access was more
    important that quality.

    Same as at a high school I was recently doing some consulting for. I
    recommended that they network every classroom and put a couple of
    terminal clients running off a K12LTSP server. However, the vendor
    didn't like terminal clients saying they didn't allow as much to be
    done as networked PCs. However, the cost of say 12 terminal clients
    and a terminal server is about the cost of two networked PCs. This
    would give 10 more students access to the internet and word processing
    over just two who could do other things like scanning/video editing.
    I'm not against networked PCs, I just think that terminal clients for
    doing basic tasks provides more access and better value to students
    than just a couple of expensive machines.

    But alas, the school didn't see that, they sided with the vendor. I
    wouldn't mind working with the Ministry of Education again. I hate
    seeing schools getting taken to the cleaners by vendors with just
    their own interests in mind. Schools aren't cash cows, they're there
    to support the students.
    --
    Cheers,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Jul 26, 2006
    #3
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