Programming language selection and training

Discussion in 'MCAD' started by Tony Jarvis, Dec 27, 2003.

  1. Tony Jarvis

    Tony Jarvis Guest

    Hello, I have a few questions keeping me up at night.


    1) Most people learn a programming language because they
    work for a company that already uses it, so they are told
    to learn it. I am learning programming and want to start
    my own company one day around programming. Could you
    please inform me how I should best evaluate each of the
    Microsoft programming languages and decide which one is
    best for me? I know that Visual Basic is very easy but
    programs are larger and slower compared to Visual C++,
    but that's as far as my knowledge goes.

    2) I think I am tossing up between learning Visual C++
    and C#. I already know beginning Visual C++ and MFC.
    Unfortunately, Microsoft does not offer much Visual C++
    training (only Managed Extensions which are far beyond me
    at the moment). If it turns out I want to learn Visual
    C++ instead of C#, what other avenues are available to me
    to learn in depth Visual C++ skills without working for a
    programming company? I want to learn skills like how to
    create set up programs, distribute updates and patches
    etc. Things that go beyond a simple programming concepts
    book.

    3) What learning do I need to do before attempting the
    MSAD? I know there are prerequisite studies. How do I
    obtain this programming experience?

    Any help you could provide would be invaluable to me.

    Thanking you in advance,

    Tony Jarvis
    Tony Jarvis, Dec 27, 2003
    #1
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  2. Tony Jarvis

    Hermit Dave Guest

    Tony,

    I wouldn't advise you to get on the VC++ route, purely for one reason.
    well win32s future as is looks bleak. Reasons being... one it was a pain in
    the neck
    Programming in VB was easy but to do something with win32s was not easy.
    VC++ was good and could do almost everything easily but you had the problems
    of memory leak and lot of things based on weak pointer references
    With .NET microsoft is essentially starting with a clean slate... no
    complexities (not unusual ones)... and a common framework for all
    languages...
    i would suggest C# for one reason.. being its 100% pure... unlike VB or VC++
    ..... things were not changed to make C# work with .NET
    plus its a great language.. with lots of features... hybrid C++/ java sytax
    and VB like programming model. Not to forget it's standardized

    Plus you will get all the resources you want....

    --
    Regards,

    HD

    "Tony Jarvis" <> wrote in message
    news:026801c3cc1e$38a812d0$...
    > Hello, I have a few questions keeping me up at night.
    >
    >
    > 1) Most people learn a programming language because they
    > work for a company that already uses it, so they are told
    > to learn it. I am learning programming and want to start
    > my own company one day around programming. Could you
    > please inform me how I should best evaluate each of the
    > Microsoft programming languages and decide which one is
    > best for me? I know that Visual Basic is very easy but
    > programs are larger and slower compared to Visual C++,
    > but that's as far as my knowledge goes.
    >
    > 2) I think I am tossing up between learning Visual C++
    > and C#. I already know beginning Visual C++ and MFC.
    > Unfortunately, Microsoft does not offer much Visual C++
    > training (only Managed Extensions which are far beyond me
    > at the moment). If it turns out I want to learn Visual
    > C++ instead of C#, what other avenues are available to me
    > to learn in depth Visual C++ skills without working for a
    > programming company? I want to learn skills like how to
    > create set up programs, distribute updates and patches
    > etc. Things that go beyond a simple programming concepts
    > book.
    >
    > 3) What learning do I need to do before attempting the
    > MSAD? I know there are prerequisite studies. How do I
    > obtain this programming experience?
    >
    > Any help you could provide would be invaluable to me.
    >
    > Thanking you in advance,
    >
    > Tony Jarvis
    Hermit Dave, Dec 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. Tony Jarvis

    Tony Jarvis Guest

    Thank you very much for your advice. I will take your
    advice and start with some introductory C#.

    Just 2 quick questions:
    1) How do people know what language to choose? There are
    so many opinions and marketing spiel on the web, it is
    very hard to understand the core differences and
    benefits/drawbacks of each. How did you learn the
    differences? Or is there an article somewhere on the web
    you could point me to?

    2) If the books are not being published any more for
    VC++, does this mean effectively VC++ programmers must
    teach themselves things and learn from message posts at
    codeguru.com etc? It seems like you already have to be
    really smart at that language to learn new things through
    self-teaching or peers.

    Thank you again for your help.

    Tony Jarvis
    >-----Original Message-----
    >Tony,
    >
    >I wouldn't advise you to get on the VC++ route, purely

    for one reason.
    >well win32s future as is looks bleak. Reasons being...

    one it was a pain in
    >the neck
    >Programming in VB was easy but to do something with

    win32s was not easy.
    >VC++ was good and could do almost everything easily but

    you had the problems
    >of memory leak and lot of things based on weak pointer

    references
    >With .NET microsoft is essentially starting with a clean

    slate... no
    >complexities (not unusual ones)... and a common

    framework for all
    >languages...
    >i would suggest C# for one reason.. being its 100%

    pure... unlike VB or VC++
    >..... things were not changed to make C# work with .NET
    >plus its a great language.. with lots of features...

    hybrid C++/ java sytax
    >and VB like programming model. Not to forget it's

    standardized
    >
    >Plus you will get all the resources you want....
    >
    >--
    >Regards,
    >
    >HD
    >
    >"Tony Jarvis" <> wrote in

    message
    >news:026801c3cc1e$38a812d0$...
    >> Hello, I have a few questions keeping me up at night.
    >>
    >>
    >> 1) Most people learn a programming language because

    they
    >> work for a company that already uses it, so they are

    told
    >> to learn it. I am learning programming and want to

    start
    >> my own company one day around programming. Could you
    >> please inform me how I should best evaluate each of the
    >> Microsoft programming languages and decide which one is
    >> best for me? I know that Visual Basic is very easy but
    >> programs are larger and slower compared to Visual C++,
    >> but that's as far as my knowledge goes.
    >>
    >> 2) I think I am tossing up between learning Visual C++
    >> and C#. I already know beginning Visual C++ and MFC.
    >> Unfortunately, Microsoft does not offer much Visual C++
    >> training (only Managed Extensions which are far beyond

    me
    >> at the moment). If it turns out I want to learn Visual
    >> C++ instead of C#, what other avenues are available to

    me
    >> to learn in depth Visual C++ skills without working

    for a
    >> programming company? I want to learn skills like how to
    >> create set up programs, distribute updates and patches
    >> etc. Things that go beyond a simple programming

    concepts
    >> book.
    >>
    >> 3) What learning do I need to do before attempting the
    >> MSAD? I know there are prerequisite studies. How do I
    >> obtain this programming experience?
    >>
    >> Any help you could provide would be invaluable to me.
    >>
    >> Thanking you in advance,
    >>
    >> Tony Jarvis

    >
    >
    >.
    >
    Tony Jarvis, Dec 28, 2003
    #3
  4. Tony Jarvis

    Hermit Dave Guest

    Tony,

    Well you either learn from you own experience or you learn from someone
    else's.
    Well i have worked on almost all languages... even java for a few days....
    I do constantly read up on all sorts of sites... and i reckon if you chase
    technology long enough... you can see were its all going ... atleast to some
    extent... Well core drawbacks and difference between each are either
    practical or from articles on msdn or other sites.... and learning a
    language is only a small part of the whole... you need to learn and
    appreciate how the framework works on the whole... just google for '.net
    framework'... think as far as framework is concerned its so good that even
    people who are opposed to anything microsoft says or does, are actually
    adopting the framework..... www.go-mono.com

    And c++ is not dead just yet... there were good many people who used to work
    with MFC and ATL (consider this.... java was good to microsoft and IT in
    general... it took away the lot who were around for a quick buck... and we
    only had dedicated programmers for a while... so microsoft wont just drive
    them away by forcing them to change or learn new languages...) and you still
    have those areas plus you have the new managed extensions.... not something
    i am comfortable with but the heck.... i have seen book on managed
    extensions... have a look at
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos...d c++&bq=1/ref=sr_aps_all/026-7094641-6314036

    well self learning isnt so bad.... okay maybe it takes longer... and there
    are places like the newsgroups.... you have whole lot of dotnet and language
    specific newgroups... plus you have msdn and other sites...
    --
    Regards,

    HD

    "Tony Jarvis" <> wrote in message
    news:020b01c3ccdc$416e3980$...
    > Thank you very much for your advice. I will take your
    > advice and start with some introductory C#.
    >
    > Just 2 quick questions:
    > 1) How do people know what language to choose? There are
    > so many opinions and marketing spiel on the web, it is
    > very hard to understand the core differences and
    > benefits/drawbacks of each. How did you learn the
    > differences? Or is there an article somewhere on the web
    > you could point me to?
    >
    > 2) If the books are not being published any more for
    > VC++, does this mean effectively VC++ programmers must
    > teach themselves things and learn from message posts at
    > codeguru.com etc? It seems like you already have to be
    > really smart at that language to learn new things through
    > self-teaching or peers.
    >
    > Thank you again for your help.
    >
    > Tony Jarvis
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >Tony,
    > >
    > >I wouldn't advise you to get on the VC++ route, purely

    > for one reason.
    > >well win32s future as is looks bleak. Reasons being...

    > one it was a pain in
    > >the neck
    > >Programming in VB was easy but to do something with

    > win32s was not easy.
    > >VC++ was good and could do almost everything easily but

    > you had the problems
    > >of memory leak and lot of things based on weak pointer

    > references
    > >With .NET microsoft is essentially starting with a clean

    > slate... no
    > >complexities (not unusual ones)... and a common

    > framework for all
    > >languages...
    > >i would suggest C# for one reason.. being its 100%

    > pure... unlike VB or VC++
    > >..... things were not changed to make C# work with .NET
    > >plus its a great language.. with lots of features...

    > hybrid C++/ java sytax
    > >and VB like programming model. Not to forget it's

    > standardized
    > >
    > >Plus you will get all the resources you want....
    > >
    > >--
    > >Regards,
    > >
    > >HD
    > >
    > >"Tony Jarvis" <> wrote in

    > message
    > >news:026801c3cc1e$38a812d0$...
    > >> Hello, I have a few questions keeping me up at night.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> 1) Most people learn a programming language because

    > they
    > >> work for a company that already uses it, so they are

    > told
    > >> to learn it. I am learning programming and want to

    > start
    > >> my own company one day around programming. Could you
    > >> please inform me how I should best evaluate each of the
    > >> Microsoft programming languages and decide which one is
    > >> best for me? I know that Visual Basic is very easy but
    > >> programs are larger and slower compared to Visual C++,
    > >> but that's as far as my knowledge goes.
    > >>
    > >> 2) I think I am tossing up between learning Visual C++
    > >> and C#. I already know beginning Visual C++ and MFC.
    > >> Unfortunately, Microsoft does not offer much Visual C++
    > >> training (only Managed Extensions which are far beyond

    > me
    > >> at the moment). If it turns out I want to learn Visual
    > >> C++ instead of C#, what other avenues are available to

    > me
    > >> to learn in depth Visual C++ skills without working

    > for a
    > >> programming company? I want to learn skills like how to
    > >> create set up programs, distribute updates and patches
    > >> etc. Things that go beyond a simple programming

    > concepts
    > >> book.
    > >>
    > >> 3) What learning do I need to do before attempting the
    > >> MSAD? I know there are prerequisite studies. How do I
    > >> obtain this programming experience?
    > >>
    > >> Any help you could provide would be invaluable to me.
    > >>
    > >> Thanking you in advance,
    > >>
    > >> Tony Jarvis

    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >
    Hermit Dave, Dec 28, 2003
    #4
  5. Tony Jarvis

    Olav.NET Guest

    "Tony Jarvis" <> wrote in message news:<026801c3cc1e$38a812d0$>...
    > Hello, I have a few questions keeping me up at night.

    Depends on what kind of marked your company will target.

    For enterprise development, definitely .NET, but for say shareware
    apps for home use perhaps VB6 or VC++ --- VC++ if you might go
    x-platform.

    Olav
    Olav.NET, Dec 28, 2003
    #5
    1. Advertising

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