Programming-Language Popularity

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. Measured various ways <http://www.langpop.com/>.

    Interesting to see which one ends up on top of nearly every list. :)
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2009
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    steve Guest

    On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 13:50:28 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > Measured various ways <http://www.langpop.com/>.
    >
    > Interesting to see which one ends up on top of nearly every list. :)


    Kernigan and Ritchie still rule! But where's the work? It's been years
    since I saw a C contract offered!

    Steve
    steve, Apr 10, 2009
    #2
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  3. In message <grmenc$o0c$>, steve wrote:

    > But where's the work? It's been years since I saw a C contract offered!


    A lot of Free software is built in C, but a lot of it is lower-level stuff,
    like runtime libraries and implementations of higher-level languages (e.g.
    Python, Perl, Ruby).

    I suspect that companies doing in-house work would rather build on the
    higher-level stuff rather than work directly in C.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2009
    #3
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Will Spencer Guest

    On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 03:34:04 +0000 (UTC), steve wrote:

    > On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 13:50:28 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> Measured various ways <http://www.langpop.com/>.
    >>
    >> Interesting to see which one ends up on top of nearly every list. :)

    >
    > Kernigan and Ritchie still rule! But where's the work? It's been years
    > since I saw a C contract offered!
    >
    > Steve


    Don't find contracts, find customers. Then you can use what ever language
    you want.

    -ws
    Will Spencer, Apr 10, 2009
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Will Spencer Guest

    On 10 Apr 2009 18:35:59 +1300, vitw wrote:

    > On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 03:34:04 +0000, steve wrote:
    >
    >> Kernigan and Ritchie still rule! But where's the work? It's been years
    >> since I saw a C contract offered!

    >
    > Employers don't have to offer them. They just pass word to their
    > employees and contractors, who in turn bring in their K&R Church mates.
    >
    > But wow! C?!? I would have thought Java would have dominated most lists.
    > It's such a darling with the suits!


    I've only ever seen suits at weddings and funerals, and they've never
    mentioned Java, not even once.

    -ws
    Will Spencer, Apr 10, 2009
    #5
  6. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Will Spencer Guest

    On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 13:50:28 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > Measured various ways <http://www.langpop.com/>.
    >
    > Interesting to see which one ends up on top of nearly every list. :)


    I thought it would have been the language they use to write languages with.

    -ws
    Will Spencer, Apr 10, 2009
    #6
  7. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Will Spencer Guest

    On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 18:40:39 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > In message <grmenc$o0c$>, steve wrote:
    >
    >> But where's the work? It's been years since I saw a C contract offered!

    >
    > A lot of Free software is built in C, but a lot of it is lower-level stuff,
    > like runtime libraries and implementations of higher-level languages (e.g.
    > Python, Perl, Ruby).
    >
    > I suspect that companies doing in-house work would rather build on the
    > higher-level stuff rather than work directly in C.


    I stopped using C years ago when a client told me they wern't prepared to
    pay for the time required to type the required 100,000 semi-colons I'd
    likely have in my project.

    -ws
    Will Spencer, Apr 10, 2009
    #7
  8. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Enkidu Guest

    Will Spencer wrote:
    > On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 13:50:28 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> Measured various ways <http://www.langpop.com/>.
    >>
    >> Interesting to see which one ends up on top of nearly every list.
    >> :)

    >
    > I thought it would have been the language they use to write languages
    > with.
    >

    You can write a compiler for any language in any other language.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
    Enkidu, Apr 10, 2009
    #8
  9. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    bok Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > Will Spencer wrote:
    >> On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 13:50:28 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>
    >>> Measured various ways <http://www.langpop.com/>.
    >>>
    >>> Interesting to see which one ends up on top of nearly every list.
    >>> :)

    >>
    >> I thought it would have been the language they use to write languages
    >> with.
    >>

    > You can write a compiler for any language in any other language.

    Or the same language; only the first version of a compiler needs to be
    written in a different language. The GNU C/C++ (GCC) compiler is
    written primarily in C, for example.
    bok, Apr 10, 2009
    #9
  10. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Matty F Guest

    On Apr 11, 10:39 am, bok <> wrote:
    > Enkidu wrote:
    > > Will Spencer wrote:
    > >> On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 13:50:28 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    >
    > >>> Measured various ways <http://www.langpop.com/>.

    >
    > >>> Interesting to see which one ends up on top of nearly every list.
    > >>> :)

    >
    > >> I thought it would have been the language they use to write languages
    > >> with.

    >
    > > You can write a compiler for any language in any other language.

    >
    > Or the same language; only the first version of a compiler needs to be
    > written in a different language. The GNU C/C++ (GCC) compiler is
    > written primarily in C, for example.


    I wrote a compiler in its own language in 1982. The first version was
    just a list of values basically patched in. After that it could
    compile itself. There were several hundred different instructions.
    It's still in use.
    Matty F, Apr 11, 2009
    #10
  11. In message <db29822d-7e14-40ed-991d-
    >, Matty F wrote:

    > I wrote a compiler in its own language in 1982.


    I worked on a Pascal compiler written in Pascal in 1980/81. I didn't write
    it, but I studied the source, and found and fixed an interesting little bug.
    Consider an array of bytes:

    var a : array [1 .. 81] of char;

    To generate the address of an array element, e.g. code for a construct like

    a

    the obvious thing to do is take the address of the start of the array, and
    add the offset i to it, right? Well, in certain circumstances, and for
    certain sizes of array (like the 81-byte example above), the compiler would
    wrongly generate a subtract instead of an add instruction. Why?

    Hint: this was on a PDP-11 machine.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 11, 2009
    #11
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