problems with ADSL using a telephone extension socket

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by rosenmarsh@myfastmail.com, Nov 5, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I have my computer linked to a telephone extension cable in my flat eg
    the main telephone socket is in the hallway and my computer sits on a
    desk in the lounge. I got ADSL about a year ago and had no problems
    but starting about three months ago I was finding that the speedtouch
    modem was not working when connected to the the telephone extension
    socket and only worked when I plugged into the main telephone socket so
    I have to sit on the floor by the main phone socket with my laptop to
    go online! Also at the same time I found that phone reception was very
    poor and crackly even when I was not using broadband and this only got
    better when I plugged the phone into the main socket. Although I don't
    understand why everything worked for so long without problems I have
    come to the conclusion that the problem is the telephone extension
    cable and socket. I hae an IBM thinkpad r50e running windows XP. I
    understand that I have two options
    to get a hub compatible with speedtouch modem and wifi card which will
    cost together about £70.
    to get an ethernet cable in place of the current normal telephone
    extension cable. I don't know how much this is.
    What do you recommend?

    Many thanks

    Matthew
     
    , Nov 5, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Norm Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    I have my computer linked to a telephone extension cable in my flat eg
    the main telephone socket is in the hallway and my computer sits on a
    desk in the lounge. I got ADSL about a year ago and had no problems
    but starting about three months ago I was finding that the speedtouch
    modem was not working when connected to the the telephone extension
    socket and only worked when I plugged into the main telephone socket so
    I have to sit on the floor by the main phone socket with my laptop to
    go online! Also at the same time I found that phone reception was very
    poor and crackly even when I was not using broadband and this only got
    better when I plugged the phone into the main socket. Although I don't
    understand why everything worked for so long without problems I have
    come to the conclusion that the problem is the telephone extension
    cable and socket. I hae an IBM thinkpad r50e running windows XP. I
    understand that I have two options
    to get a hub compatible with speedtouch modem and wifi card which will
    cost together about £70.
    to get an ethernet cable in place of the current normal telephone
    extension cable. I don't know how much this is.
    What do you recommend?

    Many thanks

    Matthew

    Buy a new phone extension for about £5. Why pay out far more than you need
    to? If you want to do that to cover a very small distance, buy an ADSL
    modem/router or one with wireless and hook that up. It still doesn't solve
    the problem of the extension. If you want ethernet cable look in any DIY
    place or online computer shop. Again, that doesn't solve the problem.
    Why don't you want to fit a new phone extension?
     
    Norm, Nov 5, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. G. Morgan Guest

    On 5 Nov 2006 14:23:42 -0800, wrote:

    >What do you recommend?



    Clean up your phone wiring. Have just one pair of the telco cable
    feeding the DSL modem (unfiltered) and use the other pair for house
    phones (that are filtered with one DSL filter when it comes into the
    house).

    --

    -Graham
    (remove the double e's to email)
     
    G. Morgan, Nov 5, 2006
    #3
  4. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-11-05, <> wrote:
    > I have my computer linked to a telephone extension cable in my flat eg
    > the main telephone socket is in the hallway and my computer sits on a
    > desk in the lounge. I got ADSL about a year ago and had no problems
    > but starting about three months ago I was finding that the speedtouch
    > modem was not working when connected to the the telephone extension
    > socket and only worked when I plugged into the main telephone socket so
    > I have to sit on the floor by the main phone socket with my laptop to
    > go online! Also at the same time I found that phone reception was very
    > poor and crackly even when I was not using broadband and this only got
    > better when I plugged the phone into the main socket. Although I don't
    > understand why everything worked for so long without problems I have
    > come to the conclusion that the problem is the telephone extension
    > cable and socket. I hae an IBM thinkpad r50e running windows XP. I
    > understand that I have two options
    > to get a hub compatible with speedtouch modem and wifi card which will
    > cost together about £70.
    > to get an ethernet cable in place of the current normal telephone
    > extension cable. I don't know how much this is.
    > What do you recommend?
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
    > Matthew


    Is there an 'ADSL Splitter' or 'ADSL filter' anywhere? Have you tried
    replacing it? (They're cheap, and they do go wrong, and you do need at
    least one). How many telephones etc are running off that main socket?
    Have you tried replacing the telephone extension lead? How long is that
    extension?

    It may be worth getting a 'heavy duty' DSL connection cable to go from
    your ADSL 'modem' to the ADSL Filter plugged directly into the main
    telephone socket, and run the telephone extension from the telephone
    socket in that same filter. Maplin's is a good place to get such things,
    or a local independent computer shop. (Some large chains over-charge
    horribly for the little essentials such as splitters and cables - shop
    around!).

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 6, 2006
    #4
  5. Guest

    Thanks Whiskers
    OK yes I forgot to mention the two ADSL filters. I use one at the main
    telephone socket (normally just the telephone extension socket plugs
    into this and I use one at the other end of the phone extension cable
    where I used to plug my speed touch in). At the moment I am plugging
    my modem into the filter plugged into the main phone socket at it works
    fine. I really don't think the problem is the filter as I have changed
    the filters around and still been unable to use the modem when it is
    plugged into the extension socket. I only have one telephone running
    off the main socket - it is a wireless phone. The pnone lead plugs
    into the socket at the beginning of the extension cable, this socket
    plugs into the filter which plugs into the main telephone socket.
    Even if I got a heavy duty DSL connection cable to go from ADSL modem
    to filter I cannot see how that will make a difference. The telepone
    extension will still be plugged into the same filter and the problem is
    at the other end of the extension cable 15 metres away not with the
    filter plugged into the main phone socket......



    > Is there an 'ADSL Splitter' or 'ADSL filter' anywhere? Have you tried
    > replacing it? (They're cheap, and they do go wrong, and you do need at
    > least one). How many telephones etc are running off that main socket?
    > Have you tried replacing the telephone extension lead? How long is that
    > extension?
    >
    > It may be worth getting a 'heavy duty' DSL connection cable to go from
    > your ADSL 'modem' to the ADSL Filter plugged directly into the main
    > telephone socket, and run the telephone extension from the telephone
    > socket in that same filter. Maplin's is a good place to get such things,
    > or a local independent computer shop. (Some large chains over-charge
    > horribly for the little essentials such as splitters and cables - shop
    > around!).
    >
    > --
    > -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    > -- Whiskers
    > -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    , Nov 6, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest

    Thanks Norm
    The telephone extension cable is 15 metres. I have tried putting in a
    new telephone extension cable and it made absolutely no difference. I
    am not sure why you think replacing the phone extension cable with an
    ethernet cable would not solve the problem?


    > Buy a new phone extension for about £5. Why pay out far more than you need
    > to? If you want to do that to cover a very small distance, buy an ADSL
    > modem/router or one with wireless and hook that up. It still doesn't solve
    > the problem of the extension. If you want ethernet cable look in any DIY
    > place or online computer shop. Again, that doesn't solve the problem.
    > Why don't you want to fit a new phone extension?
     
    , Nov 6, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest

    Oh dear you've lost me on this one! I assume you are saying take away
    the ADSL filter which is at the end of the 15 metre phone extension
    cable but how then do I plug the modem into a phone socket? The end
    of the cable from modem to filter doesn't fit in a phone socket it only
    fits in a filter. I have always understood that I need filters at both
    ends if using an extension cable eg computer - modem - filter -
    extension cable - filter - main socket. At the moment I am bypassing
    this by having computer - modem - filter - main socket....... >
    >
    > Clean up your phone wiring. Have just one pair of the telco cable
    > feeding the DSL modem (unfiltered) and use the other pair for house
    > phones (that are filtered with one DSL filter when it comes into the
    > house).
    >
    > --
    >
    > -Graham
    > (remove the double e's to email)
     
    , Nov 6, 2006
    #7
  8. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-11-06, <> wrote:
    >> Is there an 'ADSL Splitter' or 'ADSL filter' anywhere? Have you tried
    >> replacing it? (They're cheap, and they do go wrong, and you do need at
    >> least one). How many telephones etc are running off that main socket?
    >> Have you tried replacing the telephone extension lead? How long is that
    >> extension?

    >
    > Thanks Whiskers
    > OK yes I forgot to mention the two ADSL filters. I use one at the main
    > telephone socket (normally just the telephone extension socket plugs
    > into this and I use one at the other end of the phone extension cable
    > where I used to plug my speed touch in).


    Do you mean that you have a DSL filter in the main socket, plug a
    telephone extension cable into the 'telephone' socket on that, then put a
    second DSL filter at the other end of the extension and connect the
    "modem" to the 'internet' socket there? Like this:

    (mono-spaced 'font' required)


    |
    | supplier's telephone line
    |
    = main phone socket
    / \ DSL filter
    phone socket | | 'internet' socket not used
    |
    |
    extension lead |
    |
    |
    =
    / \ DSL filter
    | |
    phone socket | | 'internet' socket
    | |
    telephone < |
    |
    > DSL "Modem"



    You won't get a DSL connection from that arrangement; the internet signal
    has been filtered out before it gets to the 'modem'. Remove the DSL
    filter at the main socket and plug the telephone extension lead directly
    into that socket, then use one filter at the other end to split the
    telephone and DSL signals.

    The purpose of the DSL filter, is to isolate the low-frequency analogue
    telephone signal from the high-frequency digital 'carrier', so that you
    don't get lots of interference on the telephone. You seem to be trying to
    use your DSL "modem" on a line which has had the DSL signal filtered out
    already.

    > At the moment I am plugging
    > my modem into the filter plugged into the main phone socket at it works
    > fine. I really don't think the problem is the filter as I have changed
    > the filters around and still been unable to use the modem when it is
    > plugged into the extension socket. I only have one telephone running
    > off the main socket - it is a wireless phone. The pnone lead plugs
    > into the socket at the beginning of the extension cable, this socket
    > plugs into the filter which plugs into the main telephone socket.
    >
    >> It may be worth getting a 'heavy duty' DSL connection cable to go from
    >> your ADSL 'modem' to the ADSL Filter plugged directly into the main
    >> telephone socket, and run the telephone extension from the telephone
    >> socket in that same filter. Maplin's is a good place to get such things,
    >> or a local independent computer shop. (Some large chains over-charge
    >> horribly for the little essentials such as splitters and cables - shop
    >> around!).

    >
    > Even if I got a heavy duty DSL connection cable to go from ADSL modem
    > to filter I cannot see how that will make a difference. The telepone
    > extension will still be plugged into the same filter and the problem is
    > at the other end of the extension cable 15 metres away not with the
    > filter plugged into the main phone socket......


    The trouble is not so much with the filter plugged into the main telephone
    socket, as with the fact that you have two filters; /that/ is the problem.


    This arrangement should work:


    |
    | supplier's telephone line
    |
    = main phone socket
    |
    |
    15m extension lead |
    |
    |
    =
    / \ DSL filter
    | |
    phone socket | | 'internet' socket
    | |
    telephone < |
    |
    > DSL 'Modem'




    Or this one:

    |
    | supplier's telephone line
    |
    = main phone socket
    / \ DSL filter
    phone socket | | 'internet' socket
    | |
    | |
    15m extension lead | | 15m DSL lead
    | |
    | |
    | |
    | |
    | |
    telephone < > DSL 'Modem'


    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 6, 2006
    #8
  9. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-11-06, <> wrote:
    >> Buy a new phone extension for about £5. Why pay out far more than you need
    >> to? If you want to do that to cover a very small distance, buy an ADSL
    >> modem/router or one with wireless and hook that up. It still doesn't solve
    >> the problem of the extension. If you want ethernet cable look in any DIY
    >> place or online computer shop. Again, that doesn't solve the problem.
    >> Why don't you want to fit a new phone extension?

    >
    > Thanks Norm
    > The telephone extension cable is 15 metres. I have tried putting in a
    > new telephone extension cable and it made absolutely no difference. I
    > am not sure why you think replacing the phone extension cable with an
    > ethernet cable would not solve the problem?


    You can use an ethernet cable to connect your computer to the "modem", if
    there are suitable connectors on both devices. You can't use an ethernet
    cable to connect anything to either the telephone or 'internet' sockets on
    the DSL filter.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 6, 2006
    #9
  10. G. Morgan Guest

    On 6 Nov 2006 13:27:26 -0800, wrote:

    >Oh dear you've lost me on this one! I assume you are saying take away
    >the ADSL filter which is at the end of the 15 metre phone extension
    >cable but how then do I plug the modem into a phone socket? The end
    >of the cable from modem to filter doesn't fit in a phone socket it only
    >fits in a filter. I have always understood that I need filters at both
    >ends if using an extension cable eg computer - modem - filter -
    >extension cable - filter - main socket. At the moment I am bypassing
    >this by having computer - modem - filter - main socket....... >



    Okay.. You do not need two filters going to the same branch.

    The best setup takes the phone line from the telco pole and goes right
    to your modem.

    Since phone cable has more than one pair, you can have one pair
    (red/green or blue/blue-white) for your house phones which has a
    filter and the second pair (yellow/black or orange/orange-white)
    unfiltered to the modem. This connection would be made at the outside
    of your house at the network interface, or whatever they call it over
    there.


    I realize this is technical for the end-user, I'm in the business so
    it makes sense to me ;-)

    I think your problem has to do with your physical phone wiring, so I'd
    recommend you call a technician out to inspect your setup.

    BTW-- using a "15 metre phone extension cable" is never a good idea.
    They are cheap crap.


    --

    -Graham
    (remove the double e's to email)
     
    G. Morgan, Nov 7, 2006
    #10
  11. Guest

    >
    > Do you mean that you have a DSL filter in the main socket, plug a
    > telephone extension cable into the 'telephone' socket on that, then put a
    > second DSL filter at the other end of the extension and connect the
    > "modem" to the 'internet' socket there? Like this:
    >
    > (mono-spaced 'font' required)
    >
    >
    > |
    > | supplier's telephone line
    > |
    > = main phone socket
    > / \ DSL filter | | 'internet' socket not used
    > I

    EXTENSION LEAD PHONE SOCKET---PHONE LINE TO CORDLESS PHONE DOCKER >

    > |
    > extension lead 15 metres
    > |
    > |

    EXTENSION LEAD PHONE SOCKET
    > / \

    DSL filter I I PHONE SOCKET NOT USED
    > | |
    > DSL MODEM CABLE
    > |
    > DSL "Modem"
    >
    >Hi Whiskers

    I have adjusted your initial diagram and added words in capital letters
    to show current arrangement. Before I can work out what you are
    suggesting I need you to see the set up as it is at the moment. There
    is no telephone plugged in at the far end of the extension cable. At
    the supplier phone socket end, the DSL internet socket is unused, at
    the extension socket end the DSL phone socket is unused.
    Currently I am only able to use the internet when I plug my speed touch
    modem into the DSL internet socket at the supplier socket end.

    > You won't get a DSL connection from that arrangement; the internet signal
    > has been filtered out before it gets to the 'modem'. Remove the DSL
    > filter at the main socket and plug the telephone extension lead directly
    > into that socket, then use one filter at the other end to split the
    > telephone and DSL signals.


    I tried the above and it does not work. The right speed touch modem
    light flashes and no dialling tone is reported.
    >
    > The purpose of the DSL filter, is to isolate the low-frequency analogue
    > telephone signal from the high-frequency digital 'carrier', so that you
    > don't get lots of interference on the telephone. You seem to be trying to
    > use your DSL "modem" on a line which has had the DSL signal filtered out
    > already.
    >
    >I understand that maybe it is not necessary to use two ADSL filters but I need you to be clear about current setup.

    Many thanks

    Matthew
     
    , Nov 7, 2006
    #11
  12. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-11-07, <> wrote:
    >>
    >> Do you mean that you have a DSL filter in the main socket, plug a
    >> telephone extension cable into the 'telephone' socket on that, then put a
    >> second DSL filter at the other end of the extension and connect the
    >> "modem" to the 'internet' socket there? Like this:
    >>
    >> (mono-spaced 'font' required)
    >>
    >>
    >> |
    >> | supplier's telephone line
    >> |
    >> = main phone socket
    >> / \ DSL filter | | 'internet' socket not used
    >> I

    > EXTENSION LEAD PHONE SOCKET---PHONE LINE TO CORDLESS PHONE DOCKER >
    >
    >> |
    >> extension lead 15 metres
    >> |
    >> |

    > EXTENSION LEAD PHONE SOCKET
    >> / \

    > DSL filter I I PHONE SOCKET NOT USED
    >> | |
    >> DSL MODEM CABLE
    >> |
    >> DSL "Modem"
    >>

    > Hi Whiskers
    > I have adjusted your initial diagram and added words in capital letters
    > to show current arrangement.


    That adjustment doesn't seem to have worked ... I'm totally confused by the
    'extension lead socket --- phone line to cordless phone docker' part. What
    is the 'docker' plugged into? Is there a 'telephone socket doubler'
    plugged into the wall socket, with two things plugged into that - one of
    those things being the 'docker', the other being an ADSL filter? If so,
    that's wrong - the phone (or the 'docker') should be plugged into the
    'telephone' socket on an ADSL filter.

    > Before I can work out what you are
    > suggesting I need you to see the set up as it is at the moment.


    That is what I'm trying to get clear.

    > There
    > is no telephone plugged in at the far end of the extension cable.


    OK; not relevant to the internet connection anyway.

    > At
    > the supplier phone socket end, the DSL internet socket is unused,


    Ah; so as I suspected, the lead that goes 15 metres from there to where
    the ADSL "Modem" is, is a telephone extension lead plugged into the
    telephone socket on the DSL filter. That is why you can't use the ADSL
    "modem" at the 'far' end of the extension lead - you have it plugged into
    the socket on the filter that has had the DSL signal blocked off.

    > at
    > the extension socket end the DSL phone socket is unused.


    With your present arrangement, the ADSL filter at the far end of the
    extension lead is doing precisely nothing.

    > Currently I am only able to use the internet when I plug my speed touch
    > modem into the DSL internet socket at the supplier socket end.


    correct, and predictable, if I've understood you correcvtly - at present
    you aren't letting the ADSL signal get any forther than there.

    >> You won't get a DSL connection from that arrangement; the internet signal
    >> has been filtered out before it gets to the 'modem'. Remove the DSL
    >> filter at the main socket and plug the telephone extension lead directly
    >> into that socket, then use one filter at the other end to split the
    >> telephone and DSL signals.

    >
    > I tried the above and it does not work. The right speed touch modem
    > light flashes and no dialling tone is reported.
    > >
    >> The purpose of the DSL filter, is to isolate the low-frequency analogue
    >> telephone signal from the high-frequency digital 'carrier', so that you
    >> don't get lots of interference on the telephone. You seem to be trying to
    >> use your DSL "modem" on a line which has had the DSL signal filtered out
    >> already.

    >
    > I understand that maybe it is not necessary to use two ADSL filters but I
    > need you to be clear about current setup.
    > Many thanks
    >
    > Matthew


    Let's re-state what you seem to be wanting to achieve.

    1) Where the main telepone wall socket is, you want to connect your
    wireless phone docker.

    2) 15 metres away, as the cable threads, you want to have your ADSL
    "modem".

    Is that accurate?

    You need to bear in mind that your telephones (including the 'docker' for
    your wireless phone) must be plugged in via the 'telephone' socket on a
    DSL filter. You also need to bear in mind that any lead to which your
    ADSL "Modem" is going to be connected, must at no point be plugged into
    the 'telephone' socket on a filter - the whole purpose of that filter is
    to stop ADSL signals getting to the telephone.

    So, your 'docker' must be plugged into a filter. If you put that filter
    directly into the wall socket, then you will need a 15 metre DSL lead (not
    a telephone lead, not an ethernet lead) from the 'internet' socket on that
    filter to your "modem". You can get such leads - preferably, get a 'heavy
    duty' one that has the ruggedness to take a few knocks; the short DSL
    leads supplied with most "modems" are a bit feeble.

    Or, you could have a simple 'telephone socket doubler' plugged directly
    into the wall socket, and run a telephone extension lead 15 metres to the
    "modem" and have a filter there, into the 'internet' socket of which you
    plug the "modem". That might work, if the telephone extension lead and
    all the plugs and sockets are in good condition and not at all loose or
    kinked. If you do that, you will need a second filter into the
    'telephone' socket of which you will plug the 'docker', and then plug the
    filter into the other socket on the 'doubler'. That is putting a rather
    large mechanical strain on the wall socket, even if you can get all those
    things plugged in so close together, so the connections may not be very
    reliable.

    Or, you could put the "modem" next to the "docker", each plugged into its
    own socket on a filter plugged directly into the wall socket. Then run an
    'ethernet' cable 15 metres from your "modem" to the computer - if the
    "modem" and computer both have ethernet sockets.





    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 7, 2006
    #12
  13. G. Morgan Guest

    On Tue, 7 Nov 2006 22:51:30 +0000, Whiskers <>
    wrote:

    >Let's re-state what you seem to be wanting to achieve.
    >
    >1) Where the main telepone wall socket is, you want to connect your
    >wireless phone docker.
    >
    >2) 15 metres away, as the cable threads, you want to have your ADSL
    >"modem".
    >
    >Is that accurate?



    NO!

    You want the modem connected to the phone system as close as possible
    to the street.

    Look at this diagram:

    http://www.dixie-net.com/Media/HDCSingle.jpg

    --

    -Graham
    (remove the double e's to email)
     
    G. Morgan, Nov 7, 2006
    #13
  14. Guest


    > >> |
    > >> | supplier's telephone line
    > >> |
    > >> = main phone socket
    > >> / \ DSL filter | | 'internet' socket not used
    > >> I

    > > EXTENSION LEAD PHONE SOCKET---PHONE LINE TO CORDLESS PHONE DOCKER >
    > >
    > >> |
    > >> extension lead 15 metres
    > >> |
    > >> |

    > > EXTENSION LEAD PHONE SOCKET
    > >> / \

    > > DSL filter I I PHONE SOCKET NOT USED
    > >> | |
    > >> DSL MODEM CABLE
    > >> |
    > >> DSL "Modem"
    > >>

    > That adjustment doesn't seem to have worked ... I'm totally confused by the
    > 'extension lead socket --- phone line to cordless phone docker' part. What
    > is the 'docker' plugged into? Is there a 'telephone socket doubler'
    > plugged into the wall socket, with two things plugged into that - one of
    > those things being the 'docker', the other being an ADSL filter? If so,
    > that's wrong - the phone (or the 'docker') should be plugged into the
    > 'telephone' socket on an ADSL filter.


    OK I THINK WE ARE GETTING THERE :) THERE IS A CABLE FROM THE CORDLESS
    PHONE DOCKER PLUGGED INTO THE FEMALE SOCKET OF THE EXTENSION CABLE, THE
    OTHER SIDE OF THAT SOCKET HAS A MALE ELEMENT WHICH IS IN TURN PLUGGED
    INTO THE THE FEMALE PHONE SOCKET OF THE ADSL FILTER. ON THE OTHER SIDE
    OF THE FILTER IS A SHORT LEAD ENDING IN A MALE SOCKET WHICH IS PLUGGED
    INTO THE SUPPLIER PHONE SOCKET. AT THE OTHER END OF THE 15 METRE PHONE
    CABLE IS A FEMALE SOCKET WHERE THE SECOND ADSL FILTER IS PLUGGED INTO.
    >
    > > At
    > > the supplier phone socket end, the DSL internet socket is unused,

    >
    > Ah; so as I suspected, the lead that goes 15 metres from there to where
    > the ADSL "Modem" is, is a telephone extension lead plugged into the
    > telephone socket on the DSL filter. YES!

    That is why you can't use the ADSL
    > "modem" at the 'far' end of the extension lead - you have it plugged into
    > the socket on the filter that has had the DSL signal blocked off.
    >
    > > at
    > > the extension socket end the DSL phone socket is unused.

    >
    > With your present arrangement, the ADSL filter at the far end of the
    > extension lead is doing precisely nothing.
    >
    > > Currently I am only able to use the internet when I plug my speed touch
    > > modem into the DSL internet socket at the supplier socket end.

    >
    > correct, and predictable, if I've understood you correcvtly - at present
    > you aren't letting the ADSL signal get any forther than there.
    >
    > >
    > >

    > Let's re-state what you seem to be wanting to achieve.
    >
    > 1) Where the main telepone wall socket is, you want to connect your
    > wireless phone docker.
    >
    > 2) 15 metres away, as the cable threads, you want to have your ADSL
    > "modem".
    >
    > Is that accurate? YES!
    >
    > You need to bear in mind that your telephones (including the 'docker' for
    > your wireless phone) must be plugged in via the 'telephone' socket on a
    > DSL filter.

    YES THAT IS THE CASE AT THE MOMENT. I ONLY HAVE ONE PHONE BUT THAT IS
    PLUGGED INTO THE DSL FILTER VIA THE FEMALE EXTENSION LEAD SOCKET

    You also need to bear in mind that any lead to which your
    > ADSL "Modem" is going to be connected, must at no point be plugged into
    > the 'telephone' socket on a filter - the whole purpose of that filter is
    > to stop ADSL signals getting to the telephone.
    >
    > So, your 'docker' must be plugged into a filter. If you put that filter
    > directly into the wall socket, then you will need a 15 metre DSL lead (not
    > a telephone lead, not an ethernet lead) from the 'internet' socket on that
    > filter to your "modem". You can get such leads - preferably, get a 'heavy
    > duty' one that has the ruggedness to take a few knocks; the short DSL
    > leads supplied with most "modems" are a bit feeble.


    THIS SEEMS POSSIBLE. DISPENSING WITH THE TELEPHONE EXTENSION CABLE AS
    I ONLY USE IT FOR THE MODEM ANYWAY AND REPLACING WITH DSL LEAD GOING
    STRAIGHT TO MODEM...
    >
    > Or, you could have a simple 'telephone socket doubler' plugged directly
    > into the wall socket, and run a telephone extension lead 15 metres to the
    > "modem" and have a filter there, into the 'internet' socket of which you
    > plug the "modem". That might work, if the telephone extension lead and
    > all the plugs and sockets are in good condition and not at all loose or
    > kinked.

    If you do that, you will need a second filter into the
    > 'telephone' socket of which you will plug the 'docker', and then plug the
    > filter into the other socket on the 'doubler'.

    DON'T QUITE GET LAST PART. I UNDERSTAND I HAVE A TELEPHONE SOCKET
    DOUBLER WITH EXTENSION LEAD RUNNING OUT OF ONE DOUBLER SOCKET AND DSL
    FILTER AND MODEM AT OTHER END. IN OTHER SOCKET OF DOUBLER I HAVE DSL
    FILTER AND DOCKER CABLE. IS THIS CORRECT? IF SO SEEMS CHEAPEST OPTION.

    That is putting a rather
    > large mechanical strain on the wall socket, even if you can get all those
    > things plugged in so close together, so the connections may not be very
    > reliable.



    >
    > Or, you could put the "modem" next to the "docker", each plugged into its
    > own socket on a filter plugged directly into the wall socket. Then run an
    > 'ethernet' cable 15 metres from your "modem" to the computer - if the
    > "modem" and computer both have ethernet sockets.


    MODEM WOULD PROBABLY GET STEPPED ON AS SOCKET BY FLOOR AND DON'T KNOW
    IF SPEED TOUCH MODEM HAS ETHERNET SOCKET.


    MANY THANKS FOR YOUR HELP THUS FAR!
    >

    Matthew
     
    , Nov 8, 2006
    #14
  15. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-11-08, <> wrote:

    snip

    > OK I THINK WE ARE GETTING THERE :) THERE IS A CABLE FROM THE CORDLESS
    > PHONE DOCKER PLUGGED INTO THE FEMALE SOCKET OF THE EXTENSION CABLE, THE
    > OTHER SIDE OF THAT SOCKET HAS A MALE ELEMENT WHICH IS IN TURN PLUGGED
    > INTO THE THE FEMALE PHONE SOCKET OF THE ADSL FILTER. ON THE OTHER SIDE
    > OF THE FILTER IS A SHORT LEAD ENDING IN A MALE SOCKET WHICH IS PLUGGED
    > INTO THE SUPPLIER PHONE SOCKET. AT THE OTHER END OF THE 15 METRE PHONE
    > CABLE IS A FEMALE SOCKET WHERE THE SECOND ADSL FILTER IS PLUGGED INTO.


    Please don't shout.

    So, your 'telephone extension lead' has a 'female' and 'male' connector
    next to each other at one end? How odd. In effect, it operates exactly
    like a 'doubler' and a normal extension lead, but a little bit neater.

    The significant point, however, is that you have the 15 metre telephone
    extension lead that 'drives' the ADSL "modem", plugged into a 'telephone'
    socket on a DSL filter. That means that no DSL signal is getting to the
    "modem"; the whole purpose of the filter is to provide a telephone
    connection from which the DSL signal has been removed, so that a normal
    telephone can work properly even while you have your 'broadband' internet
    connection running.

    snip

    >> Let's re-state what you seem to be wanting to achieve.
    >>
    >> 1) Where the main telepone wall socket is, you want to connect your
    >> wireless phone docker.
    >>
    >> 2) 15 metres away, as the cable threads, you want to have your ADSL
    >> "modem".
    >>
    >> Is that accurate?

    >
    > YES!
    >>
    >> You need to bear in mind that your telephones (including the 'docker' for
    >> your wireless phone) must be plugged in via the 'telephone' socket on a
    >> DSL filter.

    >
    > YES THAT IS THE CASE AT THE MOMENT. I ONLY HAVE ONE PHONE BUT THAT IS
    > PLUGGED INTO THE DSL FILTER VIA THE FEMALE EXTENSION LEAD SOCKET


    But so is the extension lead; both are plugged into the telephone socket
    of a filter, which means that neither of them is getting a DSL signal.

    >> You also need to bear in mind that any lead to which your
    >> ADSL "Modem" is going to be connected, must at no point be plugged into
    >> the 'telephone' socket on a filter - the whole purpose of that filter is
    >> to stop ADSL signals getting to the telephone.
    >>
    >> So, your 'docker' must be plugged into a filter. If you put that filter
    >> directly into the wall socket, then you will need a 15 metre DSL lead (not
    >> a telephone lead, not an ethernet lead) from the 'internet' socket on that
    >> filter to your "modem". You can get such leads - preferably, get a 'heavy
    >> duty' one that has the ruggedness to take a few knocks; the short DSL
    >> leads supplied with most "modems" are a bit feeble.

    >
    > THIS SEEMS POSSIBLE. DISPENSING WITH THE TELEPHONE EXTENSION CABLE AS
    > I ONLY USE IT FOR THE MODEM ANYWAY AND REPLACING WITH DSL LEAD GOING
    > STRAIGHT TO MODEM...
    >>
    >> Or, you could have a simple 'telephone socket doubler' plugged directly
    >> into the wall socket, and run a telephone extension lead 15 metres to the
    >> "modem" and have a filter there, into the 'internet' socket of which you
    >> plug the "modem". That might work, if the telephone extension lead and
    >> all the plugs and sockets are in good condition and not at all loose or
    >> kinked.
    >> If you do that, you will need a second filter into the
    >> 'telephone' socket of which you will plug the 'docker', and then plug the
    >> filter into the other socket on the 'doubler'.

    >
    > DON'T QUITE GET LAST PART. I UNDERSTAND I HAVE A TELEPHONE SOCKET
    > DOUBLER WITH EXTENSION LEAD RUNNING OUT OF ONE DOUBLER SOCKET AND DSL
    > FILTER AND MODEM AT OTHER END. IN OTHER SOCKET OF DOUBLER I HAVE DSL
    > FILTER AND DOCKER CABLE. IS THIS CORRECT? IF SO SEEMS CHEAPEST OPTION.


    I think you've got the idea.

    It may be cheap, but it may not be reliable.

    >> That is putting a rather
    >> large mechanical strain on the wall socket, even if you can get all those
    >> things plugged in so close together, so the connections may not be very
    >> reliable.
    >>
    >> Or, you could put the "modem" next to the "docker", each plugged into its
    >> own socket on a filter plugged directly into the wall socket. Then run an
    >> 'ethernet' cable 15 metres from your "modem" to the computer - if the
    >> "modem" and computer both have ethernet sockets.

    >
    > MODEM WOULD PROBABLY GET STEPPED ON AS SOCKET BY FLOOR AND DON'T KNOW
    > IF SPEED TOUCH MODEM HAS ETHERNET SOCKET.


    So get a longer lead to go from the "modem" to the 'internet' socket on
    the filter. Then put the "modem" on a table or a shelf, or hang it on the
    wall if it has some means of doing that. Or get a really long lead to go
    from the "modem" to the internet socket on the filter in the wall socket,
    so that you can put the "modem" where you want it - and entirely do away
    with the cheap and possibly troublesome telephone extension lead.

    It is well worth considering the purchase of a combined "modem/router" to
    replace the "modem" supplied by your ISP. You get the added security of
    the router's own controls, as well as the possibility of sharing your
    internet connection with more than one computer, or of having internet
    sockets in more than one room. Some routers include a 'printer server'
    too, so that you can access your printer over your local network instead
    of having to have it directly wired to your computer.

    > MANY THANKS FOR YOUR HELP THUS FAR!
    >>

    > Matthew


    You're welcome.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 8, 2006
    #15
  16. Guest

    Hi Whiskers

    Sorry for shouting :) Was just trying to distinguish between your
    answers and my questions.
    I tried your suggestion of a 'telephone socket doubler' as it was the
    easiest and cheapest option. But didn't make any difference. I think
    the problem is that the extension cable I currently have is just not
    able to take Broadband and I need to replace it with a longer version
    of the cable I running from the modem to the ADSL adapter and then to
    the main phone socket. In UK this is called an RJ11 cable and I will
    rig it up in place of the current extension cable. In effect
    duplicating the arrangement that works at the moment but with me
    sitting at my desk 15 metres away and not in the hallway as at the
    moment! So a big thankyou once again for all your help ;-0

    Matthew
    Whiskers wrote:
    > On 2006-11-08, <> wrote:
    >
    > snip
    >
    > > OK I THINK WE ARE GETTING THERE :) THERE IS A CABLE FROM THE CORDLESS
    > > PHONE DOCKER PLUGGED INTO THE FEMALE SOCKET OF THE EXTENSION CABLE, THE
    > > OTHER SIDE OF THAT SOCKET HAS A MALE ELEMENT WHICH IS IN TURN PLUGGED
    > > INTO THE THE FEMALE PHONE SOCKET OF THE ADSL FILTER. ON THE OTHER SIDE
    > > OF THE FILTER IS A SHORT LEAD ENDING IN A MALE SOCKET WHICH IS PLUGGED
    > > INTO THE SUPPLIER PHONE SOCKET. AT THE OTHER END OF THE 15 METRE PHONE
    > > CABLE IS A FEMALE SOCKET WHERE THE SECOND ADSL FILTER IS PLUGGED INTO.

    >
    > Please don't shout.
    >
    > So, your 'telephone extension lead' has a 'female' and 'male' connector
    > next to each other at one end? How odd. In effect, it operates exactly
    > like a 'doubler' and a normal extension lead, but a little bit neater.
    >
    > The significant point, however, is that you have the 15 metre telephone
    > extension lead that 'drives' the ADSL "modem", plugged into a 'telephone'
    > socket on a DSL filter. That means that no DSL signal is getting to the
    > "modem"; the whole purpose of the filter is to provide a telephone
    > connection from which the DSL signal has been removed, so that a normal
    > telephone can work properly even while you have your 'broadband' internet
    > connection running.
    >
    > snip
    >
    > >> Let's re-state what you seem to be wanting to achieve.
    > >>
    > >> 1) Where the main telepone wall socket is, you want to connect your
    > >> wireless phone docker.
    > >>
    > >> 2) 15 metres away, as the cable threads, you want to have your ADSL
    > >> "modem".
    > >>
    > >> Is that accurate?

    > >
    > > YES!
    > >>
    > >> You need to bear in mind that your telephones (including the 'docker' for
    > >> your wireless phone) must be plugged in via the 'telephone' socket on a
    > >> DSL filter.

    > >
    > > YES THAT IS THE CASE AT THE MOMENT. I ONLY HAVE ONE PHONE BUT THAT IS
    > > PLUGGED INTO THE DSL FILTER VIA THE FEMALE EXTENSION LEAD SOCKET

    >
    > But so is the extension lead; both are plugged into the telephone socket
    > of a filter, which means that neither of them is getting a DSL signal.
    >
    > >> You also need to bear in mind that any lead to which your
    > >> ADSL "Modem" is going to be connected, must at no point be plugged into
    > >> the 'telephone' socket on a filter - the whole purpose of that filter is
    > >> to stop ADSL signals getting to the telephone.
    > >>
    > >> So, your 'docker' must be plugged into a filter. If you put that filter
    > >> directly into the wall socket, then you will need a 15 metre DSL lead (not
    > >> a telephone lead, not an ethernet lead) from the 'internet' socket on that
    > >> filter to your "modem". You can get such leads - preferably, get a 'heavy
    > >> duty' one that has the ruggedness to take a few knocks; the short DSL
    > >> leads supplied with most "modems" are a bit feeble.

    > >
    > > THIS SEEMS POSSIBLE. DISPENSING WITH THE TELEPHONE EXTENSION CABLE AS
    > > I ONLY USE IT FOR THE MODEM ANYWAY AND REPLACING WITH DSL LEAD GOING
    > > STRAIGHT TO MODEM...
    > >>
    > >> Or, you could have a simple 'telephone socket doubler' plugged directly
    > >> into the wall socket, and run a telephone extension lead 15 metres to the
    > >> "modem" and have a filter there, into the 'internet' socket of which you
    > >> plug the "modem". That might work, if the telephone extension lead and
    > >> all the plugs and sockets are in good condition and not at all loose or
    > >> kinked.
    > >> If you do that, you will need a second filter into the
    > >> 'telephone' socket of which you will plug the 'docker', and then plug the
    > >> filter into the other socket on the 'doubler'.

    > >
    > > DON'T QUITE GET LAST PART. I UNDERSTAND I HAVE A TELEPHONE SOCKET
    > > DOUBLER WITH EXTENSION LEAD RUNNING OUT OF ONE DOUBLER SOCKET AND DSL
    > > FILTER AND MODEM AT OTHER END. IN OTHER SOCKET OF DOUBLER I HAVE DSL
    > > FILTER AND DOCKER CABLE. IS THIS CORRECT? IF SO SEEMS CHEAPEST OPTION.

    >
    > I think you've got the idea.
    >
    > It may be cheap, but it may not be reliable.
    >
    > >> That is putting a rather
    > >> large mechanical strain on the wall socket, even if you can get all those
    > >> things plugged in so close together, so the connections may not be very
    > >> reliable.
    > >>
    > >> Or, you could put the "modem" next to the "docker", each plugged into its
    > >> own socket on a filter plugged directly into the wall socket. Then run an
    > >> 'ethernet' cable 15 metres from your "modem" to the computer - if the
    > >> "modem" and computer both have ethernet sockets.

    > >
    > > MODEM WOULD PROBABLY GET STEPPED ON AS SOCKET BY FLOOR AND DON'T KNOW
    > > IF SPEED TOUCH MODEM HAS ETHERNET SOCKET.

    >
    > So get a longer lead to go from the "modem" to the 'internet' socket on
    > the filter. Then put the "modem" on a table or a shelf, or hang it on the
    > wall if it has some means of doing that. Or get a really long lead to go
    > from the "modem" to the internet socket on the filter in the wall socket,
    > so that you can put the "modem" where you want it - and entirely do away
    > with the cheap and possibly troublesome telephone extension lead.
    >
    > It is well worth considering the purchase of a combined "modem/router" to
    > replace the "modem" supplied by your ISP. You get the added security of
    > the router's own controls, as well as the possibility of sharing your
    > internet connection with more than one computer, or of having internet
    > sockets in more than one room. Some routers include a 'printer server'
    > too, so that you can access your printer over your local network instead
    > of having to have it directly wired to your computer.
    >
    > > MANY THANKS FOR YOUR HELP THUS FAR!
    > >>

    > > Matthew

    >
    > You're welcome.
    >
    > --
    > -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    > -- Whiskers
    > -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    , Nov 15, 2006
    #16
  17. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-11-15, <> wrote:
    > Hi Whiskers
    >
    > Sorry for shouting :) Was just trying to distinguish between your
    > answers and my questions.


    Cue insertion of my 'boilerplate' designed for the enlightenment of usenet
    newbies using Google:-

    Please quote the relevant text from the article you are replying to, so
    that people can see your response in context; this is a newsgroup, not a
    web forum :))

    The custom is to have a > at the start of each line from the previous post
    that you are quoting in yours, and to leave a blank line between the end
    of quoted text and the start of what you are typing.

    The Google Groups web interface for newsgroups, which you are using,
    'quotes' the whole of the article you are replying to, so all you have to
    do is to delete the parts that aren't needed for your reply to make sense.
    If you want to insert some words of your own in the middle of the quoted
    text from the previous article, you can move your 'typing cursor' to the
    appropriate point and hit return twice to insert a blank line at that
    point, then hit return again to get a new line where you can start typing.
    When you've finished that part of your reply, hit return again to get an
    empty line between the end of your words and the place where the next
    portion of the previous article is 'quoted'.

    You should not type anything in a new message on a line that starts with
    a > as it will then look as though what you are typing is part of the
    previous message that you are replying to.

    Most people do not use Google Groups to read and post in newsgroups, and
    do not see the articles displayed in the way that Google does it.

    Newcomers to newsgroups should start here

    <http://computer.howstuffworks.com/newsgroup.htm>

    and here

    <http://members.fortunecity.com/nnqweb/>, the Official Home Page of the
    newsgroup called news.newusers.questions.

    > I tried your suggestion of a 'telephone socket doubler' as it was the
    > easiest and cheapest option. But didn't make any difference. I think
    > the problem is that the extension cable I currently have is just not
    > able to take Broadband and I need to replace it with a longer version
    > of the cable I running from the modem to the ADSL adapter and then to
    > the main phone socket. In UK this is called an RJ11 cable and I will
    > rig it up in place of the current extension cable. In effect
    > duplicating the arrangement that works at the moment but with me
    > sitting at my desk 15 metres away and not in the hallway as at the
    > moment!


    Yes; as long as your new cable is plugged into the 'internet' socket on
    the 'filter'. Nothing plugged into the 'telephone' socket on the filter
    will have an ADSL connection.

    > So a big thankyou once again for all your help ;-0


    Good luck :))

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 15, 2006
    #17
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. samul888@vip.163.com
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    848
    Jayesh Sharma
    Nov 13, 2005
  2. HamMan

    Socket 7 to Socket A Adapter

    HamMan, Jul 10, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    832
    Shep©
    Jul 10, 2003
  3. mucko

    WHOOPS socket 472 I meant socket 423

    mucko, Dec 28, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    793
    Blinky the Shark
    Dec 28, 2004
  4. spig

    Telephone socket wiring

    spig, May 14, 2007, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,200
  5. peterwn

    Re: How do you remove a telephone socket?

    peterwn, Dec 5, 2010, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    2,457
Loading...

Share This Page