Problem with Sipura SPA 2000

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by Harry Stottle, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. I am having problems with a Sipura SPA 2000 ATA. It is dead apart from the
    mains power light, which glows bright for a second when turning on the
    power, then immediately reduces to about half the original glow, the status
    light does not glow at all. The power supply is rated at 5 volt, 1 amp, and
    when I tested the power supply voltage at the output end, it was 5.1 volts,
    but when I plugged it in and tested internally at the plug/socket
    connections on the circuit board, the voltage had dropped to about 2.4
    volts, suggesting that as soon as the power supply is under load, it is
    failing and only supplying half its voltage, this seems to be backed up by
    the mains power light reducing to half brightness. Has anyone had this
    problem before, or could anyone tell me if my guess at the power supply
    fault is probably right. I have numerous power supplies which I have saved,
    'just in case' but unfortunately, none of these match the Sipura, but I do
    not want to risk buying a new power supply unless I am pretty sure it will
    cure the problem. I had thought of the universal power supplies, but I am
    not sure if they are up to the job, any suggestions welcomed.
     
    Harry Stottle, Sep 4, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "Dave {Reply Address In.Sig}" <noone$$@llondel.org> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Harry Stottle wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> I am having problems with a Sipura SPA 2000 ATA. It is dead apart from
    >> the
    >> mains power light, which glows bright for a second when turning on the
    >> power, then immediately reduces to about half the original glow, the
    >> status light does not glow at all. The power supply is rated at 5 volt, 1
    >> amp, and when I tested the power supply voltage at the output end, it was
    >> 5.1 volts, but when I plugged it in and tested internally at the
    >> plug/socket connections on the circuit board, the voltage had dropped to
    >> about 2.4 volts, suggesting that as soon as the power supply is under
    >> load, it is failing and only supplying half its voltage, this seems to be
    >> backed up by the mains power light reducing to half brightness. Has
    >> anyone
    >> had this problem before, or could anyone tell me if my guess at the power
    >> supply fault is probably right. I have numerous power supplies which I
    >> have saved, 'just in case' but unfortunately, none of these match the
    >> Sipura, but I do not want to risk buying a new power supply unless I am
    >> pretty sure it will cure the problem. I had thought of the universal
    >> power
    >> supplies, but I am not sure if they are up to the job, any suggestions
    >> welcomed.

    >
    > Just stick a 5.1 ohm resistor (preferably at least 5W rating) across the
    > PSU
    > output. If it'll supply an amp into that (which will get very hot quite
    > quickly, so don't hold it with fingers) then it's not the external PSU.
    >

    Thanks Dave, good suggestion, but unfortunately my obsession for saving
    power supplies has not stretched to resistors ;-)
    Looks around for an old TV set to dismantle, no all at the tip now.
     
    Harry Stottle, Sep 4, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Harry Stottle

    brian Guest

    On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 19:26:25 +0100, Dave {Reply Address In.Sig} wrote:

    > Harry Stottle wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> "Dave {Reply Address In.Sig}" <noone$$@llondel.org> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>
    >>> Just stick a 5.1 ohm resistor (preferably at least 5W rating) across
    >>> the PSU
    >>> output. If it'll supply an amp into that (which will get very hot
    >>> quite quickly, so don't hold it with fingers) then it's not the
    >>> external PSU.
    >>>

    >> Thanks Dave, good suggestion, but unfortunately my obsession for saving
    >> power supplies has not stretched to resistors ;-) Looks around for an
    >> old TV set to dismantle, no all at the tip now.

    >
    > You might manage to get it to do something with a 4.5V or 6V torch bulb
    > of suitable rating, if you can get one in the 5W range. However, because
    > they start with a low cold resistance, it's possible that the supply
    > will just shut down and sulk, so it's not as valid a test as with a
    > resistor if it doesn't work. If it does work, then the PSU can obviously
    > drive something close to rated load.
    >
    > Do you have a USB mains charger? Some of those will give 5V@1A.

    You don't need to draw the full current to test your PSU. Just put some
    sort of reasonable load on it and see if the voltage drops at all. If it
    stays reasonably OK then you can assume that there is something wrong
    with the SPA-2000.
    As suggested, you could try another power supply but, unless you
    determine first which is the faulty item, you risk damaging another
    supply. Further, even if you find the supply is faulty it still could be
    the SPA-2000 that has caused it to be so - so proceed with caution.
    Ideally, if you had a suitable PSU with a current limiter on it then that
    would be useful.
     
    brian, Sep 4, 2009
    #3
  4. "brian" <> wrote in message
    news:Zkeom.75604$...
    > On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 19:26:25 +0100, Dave {Reply Address In.Sig} wrote:
    >
    >> Harry Stottle wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Dave {Reply Address In.Sig}" <noone$$@llondel.org> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>>
    >>>> Just stick a 5.1 ohm resistor (preferably at least 5W rating) across
    >>>> the PSU
    >>>> output. If it'll supply an amp into that (which will get very hot
    >>>> quite quickly, so don't hold it with fingers) then it's not the
    >>>> external PSU.
    >>>>
    >>> Thanks Dave, good suggestion, but unfortunately my obsession for saving
    >>> power supplies has not stretched to resistors ;-) Looks around for an
    >>> old TV set to dismantle, no all at the tip now.

    >>
    >> You might manage to get it to do something with a 4.5V or 6V torch bulb
    >> of suitable rating, if you can get one in the 5W range. However, because
    >> they start with a low cold resistance, it's possible that the supply
    >> will just shut down and sulk, so it's not as valid a test as with a
    >> resistor if it doesn't work. If it does work, then the PSU can obviously
    >> drive something close to rated load.
    >>
    >> Do you have a USB mains charger? Some of those will give 5V@1A.

    > You don't need to draw the full current to test your PSU. Just put some
    > sort of reasonable load on it and see if the voltage drops at all. If it
    > stays reasonably OK then you can assume that there is something wrong
    > with the SPA-2000.


    Thanks, that appears to be what happens when a load (the SPA-2000) is
    connected, the supply voltage drops by about half, from 5.1 volts to 2.4
    volts, suggesting the power supply.

    > As suggested, you could try another power supply but, unless you
    > determine first which is the faulty item, you risk damaging another
    > supply. Further, even if you find the supply is faulty it still could be
    > the SPA-2000 that has caused it to be so - so proceed with caution.
    > Ideally, if you had a suitable PSU with a current limiter on it then that
    > would be useful.
    >

    I started checking my existing equipment to see if any items had a 5v, one
    amp, power supply, but then thought the better of it because of the risk of
    damaging a good power supply, (although none of my existing supplies were
    suitable anyway), and I don't have a potentially disposable USB mains
    charger. I have had the circuit board out of the Sipura, and there are no
    visible signs of overheating, tracks burnt, or capacitors blown, which I
    would have expected if the unit had blown the power supply, and a Google
    search doesn't find any other similar faults with Sipura units, or Sipura
    power supplies, which is more worrying than finding them :)
     
    Harry Stottle, Sep 4, 2009
    #4
  5. Harry Stottle

    Dave Higton Guest

    In message <Zkeom.75604$>
    brian <> wrote:

    > You don't need to draw the full current to test your PSU. Just put some
    > sort of reasonable load on it and see if the voltage drops at all. If it
    > stays reasonably OK then you can assume that there is something wrong
    > with the SPA-2000.


    Not so. A problem with my wife's LCD monitor turned out to be that
    the in-line brick would no longer give its full rated current. In
    the case of the OP, there is very good reason to suspect that the
    PSU may have developed a similar fault.

    > As suggested, you could try another power supply but, unless you
    > determine first which is the faulty item, you risk damaging another
    > supply. Further, even if you find the supply is faulty it still could be
    > the SPA-2000 that has caused it to be so - so proceed with caution.
    > Ideally, if you had a suitable PSU with a current limiter on it then that
    > would be useful.


    All power supplies on sale have current limiting of one sort or
    another. It would not be legal to sell them otherwise, as they
    would not meet the mandatory safety standards. Substituting
    another power supply of compatible ratings is a sensible move.
    If it doesn't cure the problem, I wouldn't keep it connected
    for a long time, though - I'd agree with you just that far.

    Dave
     
    Dave Higton, Sep 4, 2009
    #5
  6. "Dave Higton" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In message <Zkeom.75604$>
    > brian <> wrote:
    >
    >> You don't need to draw the full current to test your PSU. Just put some
    >> sort of reasonable load on it and see if the voltage drops at all. If it
    >> stays reasonably OK then you can assume that there is something wrong
    >> with the SPA-2000.

    >
    > Not so. A problem with my wife's LCD monitor turned out to be that
    > the in-line brick would no longer give its full rated current. In
    > the case of the OP, there is very good reason to suspect that the
    > PSU may have developed a similar fault.
    >

    I have just been on the phone to my nephew, (he is into electronics a lot
    more than me), he said that to test the power supply properly, the voltage
    and the current have to be tested at the same time, whilst plugged into the
    Sipura to determine what exactly has failed, luckily he has the proper
    equipment to do this, so I will pop round tomorrow and let him test it. I
    will update the thread later with the results, just in case anyone else gets
    the same problem.
     
    Harry Stottle, Sep 4, 2009
    #6
  7. Harry Stottle

    Jono Guest

    Harry Stottle brought next idea :
    > "Dave Higton" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> In message <Zkeom.75604$>
    >> brian <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> You don't need to draw the full current to test your PSU. Just put some
    >>> sort of reasonable load on it and see if the voltage drops at all. If it
    >>> stays reasonably OK then you can assume that there is something wrong
    >>> with the SPA-2000.

    >>
    >> Not so. A problem with my wife's LCD monitor turned out to be that
    >> the in-line brick would no longer give its full rated current. In
    >> the case of the OP, there is very good reason to suspect that the
    >> PSU may have developed a similar fault.
    >>

    > I have just been on the phone to my nephew, (he is into electronics a lot
    > more than me), he said that to test the power supply properly, the voltage
    > and the current have to be tested at the same time, whilst plugged into the
    > Sipura to determine what exactly has failed, luckily he has the proper
    > equipment to do this, so I will pop round tomorrow and let him test it. I
    > will update the thread later with the results, just in case anyone else gets
    > the same problem.


    What, with his name, address and postcode?

    :)
     
    Jono, Sep 5, 2009
    #7
  8. "Jono" <> wrote in message
    news:_1pom.75703$...
    > Harry Stottle brought next idea :
    >> "Dave Higton" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> In message <Zkeom.75604$>
    >>> brian <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> You don't need to draw the full current to test your PSU. Just put some
    >>>> sort of reasonable load on it and see if the voltage drops at all. If
    >>>> it
    >>>> stays reasonably OK then you can assume that there is something wrong
    >>>> with the SPA-2000.
    >>>
    >>> Not so. A problem with my wife's LCD monitor turned out to be that
    >>> the in-line brick would no longer give its full rated current. In
    >>> the case of the OP, there is very good reason to suspect that the
    >>> PSU may have developed a similar fault.
    >>>

    >> I have just been on the phone to my nephew, (he is into electronics a lot
    >> more than me), he said that to test the power supply properly, the
    >> voltage and the current have to be tested at the same time, whilst
    >> plugged into the Sipura to determine what exactly has failed, luckily he
    >> has the proper equipment to do this, so I will pop round tomorrow and let
    >> him test it. I will update the thread later with the results, just in
    >> case anyone else gets the same problem.

    >
    > What, with his name, address and postcode?
    >

    He is well worth knowing as the problem is now sorted :)

    It was the power supply at fault as suspected, he connected his box of
    electronic tricks outputting exactly 5v and one amp rating, directly to the
    circuit board of the Sipura, and the power light glowed bright, with the
    status LED flashing as it should. He then dug out an old Nokia mobile phone
    power supply rated at 5.7 volts, 800ma, he cut off the incorrect size
    connector and replaced it with the connector from the Sipura power supply
    and plugged in, but the power light flashed very briefly and extinguished.
    He then made a couple of more checks and decided it was the over voltage
    that was the problem, (which we both assumed it wouldn't be), so he soldered
    a S1 diode in line to reduce the voltage to 5v approx, (he said that he
    would have normally used a 1N 4000 diode but he didn't have any). Powering
    up the Sipura with the newly adapted power supply then gave the correct
    status light flashing, and when I got it home and connected it to the phone
    and router, everything is working as it should. :)
     
    Harry Stottle, Sep 5, 2009
    #8
  9. Harry Stottle

    twelve17

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    I realize this thread is super old, but wanted to drop a line and thank you all for helping me solve my issue with a spa 2000, as it was having the exact problem as the original poster. Unfortunately, I do not own any testing equipment for verifying a faulty PSU, but luckily (and I cringe at the thought of saying "luckily" here), my parents are hoarders and thus have a ton of spare power supplies from various electronic devices throughout the years. I was able to find one with a close rating and equal polarity, and voila! Back to business.

    Cheers!
     
    twelve17, Jan 27, 2012
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Kyler Laird

    .cfg file for Sipura SPA-2000?

    Kyler Laird, Oct 23, 2004, in forum: VOIP
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    873
    Kyler Laird
    Oct 23, 2004
  2. npne
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    2,268
    Franc Zabkar
    Mar 2, 2005
  3. Fred
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    686
    Mike Schumann
    Apr 26, 2005
  4. SIP2PSTN

    x-lite Vs Sipura SPA-2000

    SIP2PSTN, Jun 14, 2005, in forum: VOIP
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    714
    Miguel Cruz
    Jun 14, 2005
  5. Mike @ www.zd8i.net

    Help with Sipgate / Draytek 2600V / Sipura SPA 2000

    Mike @ www.zd8i.net, May 14, 2005, in forum: UK VOIP
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,436
    Mike @ www.zd8i.net
    May 14, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page