Printer Circuit Board Repair

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by ng_reader, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture until
    it's convergence became hosed.

    Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10 integrated
    circuit that will fix my woes.

    It would cost more to haul it away....

    Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?

    I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.

    Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?

    ~color me curious
     
    ng_reader, Sep 30, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. ng_reader

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    ng_reader wrote:
    > OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture until
    > it's convergence became hosed.
    >
    > Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10 integrated
    > circuit that will fix my woes.
    >
    > It would cost more to haul it away....
    >
    > Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?


    A whole lot more intelligence than you displayed in asking the question.

    More details please..............

    >
    > I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.


    Love to see the state of that thing after you've used flux on it. Were
    you a plumber in a past life?
     
    Desk Rabbit, Sep 30, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ng_reader wrote:
    >> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >> until it's convergence became hosed.
    >>
    >> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    >> integrated circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>
    >> It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>
    >> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>
    >> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>
    >> Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?

    >
    > And you chose to not reveal the TV model or the circuit board under
    > discussion? I'd say go ahead and solder away, then have it hauled off.



    Ah, so. Thanks. See my responses in other threads.... You may be right, I
    may be crazy.
     
    ng_reader, Sep 30, 2009
    #3
  4. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:54:38 -0400, "ng_reader"
    > <>wrote:
    >
    >>OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >>until
    >>it's convergence became hosed.
    >>
    >>Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10 integrated
    >>circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>
    >>It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>
    >>Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>
    >>I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>
    >>Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >>
    >>~color me curious
    >>

    >
    > Replace both STK devices not just one. And look for open low value
    > resistors around the STK devices as these sometimes open when the
    > device fails.
    >
    > You'll need some solder wick, a low wattage pencil type iron to remove
    > the solder from the pins of both STK devices and any resistors that
    > opened. Practice sucking up solder with the wick on a junk PC board
    > because if you heat the lands up too much they will come loose from
    > the board.
    >
    > Make sure you use heat sink compound spread thinly and evenly on the
    > back of the STK. Clean the heat sinks of compound prior.
    >
    > You'll need to re-converge the set after its repaired, make sure you
    > can get to the alignment grid either in the service mode or user mode.


    Yes, you are correct sir! I ordered two of those dang STKs.

    As for checking, bull hockey I say!

    And, it's the "D" board on a Sony chassis RA-6A.

    Perhaps I might remove said board and contract with a local TV repairman to
    make my bad "D" board good again.

    The service manual (thank you dear Internet) goes into some detail about
    convergence. At least I think it does. But it *is* the proper service
    manual.

    Meat plow. Funny name.
     
    ng_reader, Sep 30, 2009
    #4
  5. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    "Desk Rabbit" <> wrote in message
    news:ha009s$us0$...
    > ng_reader wrote:
    >> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >> until it's convergence became hosed.
    >>
    >> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    >> integrated circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>
    >> It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>
    >> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?

    >
    > A whole lot more intelligence than you displayed in asking the question.
    >
    > More details please..............
    >
    >>
    >> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.

    >
    > Love to see the state of that thing after you've used flux on it. Were you
    > a plumber in a past life?


    I used to "sweat" plumbing but now I suck. Thank goodness everything has
    gone to either screw-on or this new thing called "shark bite".
     
    ng_reader, Sep 30, 2009
    #5
  6. ng_reader

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    ng_reader wrote:
    > "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:54:38 -0400, "ng_reader"
    >> <>wrote:
    >>
    >>> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >>> until
    >>> it's convergence became hosed.
    >>>
    >>> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10 integrated
    >>> circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>>
    >>> It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>>
    >>> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>>
    >>> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>>
    >>> Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >>>
    >>> ~color me curious
    >>>

    >> Replace both STK devices not just one. And look for open low value
    >> resistors around the STK devices as these sometimes open when the
    >> device fails.
    >>
    >> You'll need some solder wick, a low wattage pencil type iron to remove
    >> the solder from the pins of both STK devices and any resistors that
    >> opened. Practice sucking up solder with the wick on a junk PC board
    >> because if you heat the lands up too much they will come loose from
    >> the board.
    >>
    >> Make sure you use heat sink compound spread thinly and evenly on the
    >> back of the STK. Clean the heat sinks of compound prior.
    >>
    >> You'll need to re-converge the set after its repaired, make sure you
    >> can get to the alignment grid either in the service mode or user mode.

    >
    > Yes, you are correct sir! I ordered two of those dang STKs.
    >
    > As for checking, bull hockey I say!
    >
    > And, it's the "D" board on a Sony chassis RA-6A.
    >
    > Perhaps I might remove said board and contract with a local TV repairman to
    > make my bad "D" board good again.


    No, what you need to do is get a repairman to look at the whole thing
    because you patently don't have a clue. Walking into a repair shop with
    random parts will either get you laughed out of the shop or a large
    collections of bills for checking each part as you bring it in (assuming
    the shop even has your make, model and revision of device to test the
    part in).


    > The service manual (thank you dear Internet) goes into some detail about
    > convergence. At least I think it does.


    You are Scott Lifshine and I claim my 2 cents.
     
    Desk Rabbit, Sep 30, 2009
    #6
  7. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    "Desk Rabbit" <> wrote in message
    news:ha03h4$sd4$...
    > ng_reader wrote:
    >> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:54:38 -0400, "ng_reader"
    >>> <>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >>>> until
    >>>> it's convergence became hosed.
    >>>>
    >>>> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    >>>> integrated
    >>>> circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>>>
    >>>> It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>>>
    >>>> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>>>
    >>>> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>>>
    >>>> Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >>>>
    >>>> ~color me curious
    >>>>
    >>> Replace both STK devices not just one. And look for open low value
    >>> resistors around the STK devices as these sometimes open when the
    >>> device fails.
    >>>
    >>> You'll need some solder wick, a low wattage pencil type iron to remove
    >>> the solder from the pins of both STK devices and any resistors that
    >>> opened. Practice sucking up solder with the wick on a junk PC board
    >>> because if you heat the lands up too much they will come loose from
    >>> the board.
    >>>
    >>> Make sure you use heat sink compound spread thinly and evenly on the
    >>> back of the STK. Clean the heat sinks of compound prior.
    >>>
    >>> You'll need to re-converge the set after its repaired, make sure you
    >>> can get to the alignment grid either in the service mode or user mode.

    >>
    >> Yes, you are correct sir! I ordered two of those dang STKs.
    >>
    >> As for checking, bull hockey I say!
    >>
    >> And, it's the "D" board on a Sony chassis RA-6A.
    >>
    >> Perhaps I might remove said board and contract with a local TV repairman
    >> to make my bad "D" board good again.

    >
    > No, what you need to do is get a repairman to look at the whole thing
    > because you patently don't have a clue. Walking into a repair shop with
    > random parts will either get you laughed out of the shop or a large
    > collections of bills for checking each part as you bring it in (assuming
    > the shop even has your make, model and revision of device to test the part
    > in).
    >
    >
    >> The service manual (thank you dear Internet) goes into some detail about
    >> convergence. At least I think it does.

    >
    > You are Scott Lifshine and I claim my 2 cents.


    Incorrect. However you are a ****. Sorry for the foul language.
     
    ng_reader, Sep 30, 2009
    #7
  8. ng_reader

    Dan C Guest

    On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 13:25:47 -0400, ng_reader wrote:

    > "Desk Rabbit" <> wrote in message
    > news:ha03h4$sd4$...
    >> ng_reader wrote:
    >>> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:54:38 -0400, "ng_reader"
    >>>> <>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar
    >>>>> picture until
    >>>>> it's convergence became hosed.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    >>>>> integrated
    >>>>> circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> ~color me curious
    >>>>>
    >>>> Replace both STK devices not just one. And look for open low value
    >>>> resistors around the STK devices as these sometimes open when the
    >>>> device fails.
    >>>>
    >>>> You'll need some solder wick, a low wattage pencil type iron to
    >>>> remove the solder from the pins of both STK devices and any resistors
    >>>> that opened. Practice sucking up solder with the wick on a junk PC
    >>>> board because if you heat the lands up too much they will come loose
    >>>> from the board.
    >>>>
    >>>> Make sure you use heat sink compound spread thinly and evenly on the
    >>>> back of the STK. Clean the heat sinks of compound prior.
    >>>>
    >>>> You'll need to re-converge the set after its repaired, make sure you
    >>>> can get to the alignment grid either in the service mode or user
    >>>> mode.
    >>>
    >>> Yes, you are correct sir! I ordered two of those dang STKs.
    >>>
    >>> As for checking, bull hockey I say!
    >>>
    >>> And, it's the "D" board on a Sony chassis RA-6A.
    >>>
    >>> Perhaps I might remove said board and contract with a local TV
    >>> repairman to make my bad "D" board good again.

    >>
    >> No, what you need to do is get a repairman to look at the whole thing
    >> because you patently don't have a clue. Walking into a repair shop with
    >> random parts will either get you laughed out of the shop or a large
    >> collections of bills for checking each part as you bring it in
    >> (assuming the shop even has your make, model and revision of device to
    >> test the part in).
    >>
    >>
    >>> The service manual (thank you dear Internet) goes into some detail
    >>> about convergence. At least I think it does.

    >>
    >> You are Scott Lifshine and I claim my 2 cents.

    >
    > Incorrect. However you are a ****. Sorry for the foul language.


    Well, you must be his brother then, because no other family could have 2
    members with this degree of stupidity.

    Bugger off, dimwit.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    "Bother!" said Pooh, as he garotted another passing Liberal.
    Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
     
    Dan C, Sep 30, 2009
    #8
  9. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    might I suggest you and Desk Rabbit getting a room to consumate said
    relationship?
     
    ng_reader, Sep 30, 2009
    #9
  10. In message <ha017m$at6$-september.org>, "ng_reader" wrote:
    >
    > "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > ng_reader wrote:
    > >> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    > >> until it's convergence became hosed.
    > >>
    > >> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    > >> integrated circuit that will fix my woes.
    > >>
    > >> It would cost more to haul it away....
    > >>
    > >> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    > >>
    > >> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    > >>
    > >> Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?

    > >
    > > And you chose to not reveal the TV model or the circuit board under
    > > discussion? I'd say go ahead and solder away, then have it hauled off.

    >
    >
    > Ah, so. Thanks. See my responses in other threads.... You may be right, I
    > may be crazy.
    >

    No no! Do go on :) I'm starting a betting pool based on your likelyhood of
    success.



    --
    http://www.care2.com/click-to-donate/wolves/
    Proof of Americas 3rd world status:
    http://www.ramusa.org/
    Cash for *who*?
    http://www.bartcop.com/list-the-facts.htm
    http://www.pavlovianobeisance.com/
     
    §ñühw¤£f, Sep 30, 2009
    #10
  11. ng_reader

    chuckcar Guest

    "ng_reader" <> wrote in
    news:h9vuvq$ltp$-september.org:

    > OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    > until it's convergence became hosed.
    >
    > Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    > integrated circuit that will fix my woes.
    >
    > It would cost more to haul it away....
    >
    > Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >
    > I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >
    > Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >
    > ~color me curious
    >

    1. Get a soldering *iron* that is less than 30 watts. Do *not* use a gun.
    You silver the tip by wiping it on a clean cloth soaked in water and then
    applying solder (see below) when it's hot enough to melt it again. Removing
    excess the same way.

    2. Get some 60/40 solder - flux is included and plumbers flux is acid,
    so do *not* put any on anything electronic.

    3. Ask you friend exactly what parts need replacing and why the circuit
    board is one of them.

    4. Post all you hear from the above along with the model number of the
    projector and circuit board and what parts *are* dead with web links if
    possible.

    5. Wait for a reply to your now reasonable question.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Sep 30, 2009
    #11
  12. ng_reader

    NotMe Guest

    "chuckcar" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9C9697BBA82B0chucknilcar@127.0.0.1...
    : "ng_reader" <> wrote in
    : news:h9vuvq$ltp$-september.org:
    :
    : > OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    : > until it's convergence became hosed.
    : >
    : > Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    : > integrated circuit that will fix my woes.
    : >
    : > It would cost more to haul it away....
    : >
    : > Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    : >
    : > I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    : >
    : > Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    : >
    : > ~color me curious
    : >
    : 1. Get a soldering *iron* that is less than 30 watts. Do *not* use a gun.
    : You silver the tip by wiping it on a clean cloth soaked in water and then
    : applying solder (see below) when it's hot enough to melt it again.
    Removing
    : excess the same way.
    :
    : 2. Get some 60/40 solder - flux is included and plumbers flux is acid,
    : so do *not* put any on anything electronic.
    :
    : 3. Ask you friend exactly what parts need replacing and why the circuit
    : board is one of them.
    :
    : 4. Post all you hear from the above along with the model number of the
    : projector and circuit board and what parts *are* dead with web links if
    : possible.
    :
    : 5. Wait for a reply to your now reasonable question.
    :

    some electronics use no or low lead solder. the two are not compatible.
     
    NotMe, Oct 1, 2009
    #12
  13. ng_reader

    Art Guest

    Evan Platt wrote:
    > On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:54:38 -0400, "ng_reader"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture until
    >> it's convergence became hosed.
    >>
    >> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10 integrated
    >> circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>
    >> It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>
    >> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>
    >> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>
    >> Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >>
    >> ~color me curious

    >
    > Oh Boy.. I can't wait to see how CtS or RtS or Dan C responds to this
    > post... :)


    How about the short-bus guy, um what's his name? Oh yeah, Chuckycar. You
    know he'll have something astoundingly stupid to add.

    --
    Art
     
    Art, Oct 1, 2009
    #13
  14. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:54:38 -0400, "ng_reader"
    > <>wrote:
    >
    >>OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >>until
    >>it's convergence became hosed.
    >>
    >>Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10 integrated
    >>circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>
    >>It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>
    >>Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>
    >>I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>
    >>Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >>
    >>~color me curious
    >>

    >
    > Replace both STK devices not just one. And look for open low value
    > resistors around the STK devices as these sometimes open when the
    > device fails.
    >
    > You'll need some solder wick, a low wattage pencil type iron to remove
    > the solder from the pins of both STK devices and any resistors that
    > opened. Practice sucking up solder with the wick on a junk PC board
    > because if you heat the lands up too much they will come loose from
    > the board.
    >
    > Make sure you use heat sink compound spread thinly and evenly on the
    > back of the STK. Clean the heat sinks of compound prior.
    >
    > You'll need to re-converge the set after its repaired, make sure you
    > can get to the alignment grid either in the service mode or user mode.


    Ahhh, thinking back again wondering to which device is it that I test my
    open low value resistors? That is clearly something I do not possess.

    But I certainly do appreciate any reasonable response. Oh, and I'll need
    some heat sink compound. I gather that should be reasonably inexpensive.

    Of course the manual mentioned, on more than one occasion, the necessity of
    my Oscilloscope. You know, I've always wanted one of those but never found a
    need. Maybe I should poach on ebay...Nah.

    There was a "Meat Normous" a while back posting on Usenet. Any relation I
    wonder?
     
    ng_reader, Oct 1, 2009
    #14
  15. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    "§ñühw¤£f" <> wrote in message
    news:ha0hf2$uud$-september.org...
    > In message <ha017m$at6$-september.org>, "ng_reader" wrote:
    >>
    >> "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > ng_reader wrote:
    >> >> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >> >> until it's convergence became hosed.
    >> >>
    >> >> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    >> >> integrated circuit that will fix my woes.
    >> >>
    >> >> It would cost more to haul it away....
    >> >>
    >> >> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >> >>
    >> >> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >> >>
    >> >> Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >> >
    >> > And you chose to not reveal the TV model or the circuit board under
    >> > discussion? I'd say go ahead and solder away, then have it hauled off.

    >>
    >>
    >> Ah, so. Thanks. See my responses in other threads.... You may be right, I
    >> may be crazy.
    >>

    > No no! Do go on :) I'm starting a betting pool based on your likelyhood of
    > success.
    >
    >

    between us, I'd take the under, mate.
     
    ng_reader, Oct 1, 2009
    #15
  16. ng_reader

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    ng_reader wrote:
    > "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:54:38 -0400, "ng_reader"
    >> <>wrote:
    >>
    >>> OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >>> until
    >>> it's convergence became hosed.
    >>>
    >>> Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10 integrated
    >>> circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>>
    >>> It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>>
    >>> Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>>
    >>> I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>>
    >>> Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >>>
    >>> ~color me curious
    >>>

    >> Replace both STK devices not just one. And look for open low value
    >> resistors around the STK devices as these sometimes open when the
    >> device fails.
    >>
    >> You'll need some solder wick, a low wattage pencil type iron to remove
    >> the solder from the pins of both STK devices and any resistors that
    >> opened. Practice sucking up solder with the wick on a junk PC board
    >> because if you heat the lands up too much they will come loose from
    >> the board.
    >>
    >> Make sure you use heat sink compound spread thinly and evenly on the
    >> back of the STK. Clean the heat sinks of compound prior.
    >>
    >> You'll need to re-converge the set after its repaired, make sure you
    >> can get to the alignment grid either in the service mode or user mode.

    >
    > Ahhh, thinking back again wondering to which device is it that I test my
    > open low value resistors? That is clearly something I do not possess.
    >
    > But I certainly do appreciate any reasonable response. Oh, and I'll need
    > some heat sink compound. I gather that should be reasonably inexpensive.
    >
    > Of course the manual mentioned, on more than one occasion, the necessity of
    > my Oscilloscope. You know, I've always wanted one of those but never found a
    > need. Maybe I should poach on ebay...Nah.
    >
    > There was a "Meat Normous" a while back posting on Usenet. Any relation I
    > wonder?
    >
    >

    Can't make my mind up wether you are an idiot or a troll.......
     
    Desk Rabbit, Oct 1, 2009
    #16
  17. ng_reader

    philo Guest

    ng_reader wrote:
    > OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture until
    > it's convergence became hosed.
    >
    > Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10 integrated
    > circuit that will fix my woes.
    >
    > It would cost more to haul it away....
    >
    > Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >
    > I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >
    > Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >
    > ~color me curious
    >
    >


    You will need a low watt fine tipped iron...

    Use fine rosin core solder (you will not need flux)

    To unsolder the old chip use a solder wick.

    Best to get an old circuit board from some junked electronics
    and practice unsoldering and re-soldering
     
    philo, Oct 1, 2009
    #17
  18. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 20:36:41 -0400, "ng_reader"
    > <>wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:54:38 -0400, "ng_reader"
    >>> <>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>OK, I have a 5 year old projection TV that produced a stellar picture
    >>>>until
    >>>>it's convergence became hosed.
    >>>>
    >>>>Within minutes, my good friend the Internet pointed me to a $10
    >>>>integrated
    >>>>circuit that will fix my woes.
    >>>>
    >>>>It would cost more to haul it away....
    >>>>
    >>>>Anyone care to share what exactly I'll need to get my job done?
    >>>>
    >>>>I have two soldering irons, flux, and that solder.
    >>>>
    >>>>Exactly when does Bob become my uncle?
    >>>>
    >>>>~color me curious
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Replace both STK devices not just one. And look for open low value
    >>> resistors around the STK devices as these sometimes open when the
    >>> device fails.
    >>>
    >>> You'll need some solder wick, a low wattage pencil type iron to remove
    >>> the solder from the pins of both STK devices and any resistors that
    >>> opened. Practice sucking up solder with the wick on a junk PC board
    >>> because if you heat the lands up too much they will come loose from
    >>> the board.
    >>>
    >>> Make sure you use heat sink compound spread thinly and evenly on the
    >>> back of the STK. Clean the heat sinks of compound prior.
    >>>
    >>> You'll need to re-converge the set after its repaired, make sure you
    >>> can get to the alignment grid either in the service mode or user mode.

    >>
    >>Ahhh, thinking back again wondering to which device is it that I test my
    >>open low value resistors? That is clearly something I do not possess.
    >>
    >>But I certainly do appreciate any reasonable response. Oh, and I'll need
    >>some heat sink compound. I gather that should be reasonably inexpensive.
    >>
    >>Of course the manual mentioned, on more than one occasion, the necessity
    >>of
    >>my Oscilloscope. You know, I've always wanted one of those but never found
    >>a
    >>need. Maybe I should poach on ebay...Nah.
    >>
    >>There was a "Meat Normous" a while back posting on Usenet. Any relation I
    >>wonder?
    >>

    >
    > No relation.
    >
    > No need for a scope. The STK (lemme guess) 393? is the hardest working
    > part in a rear projection TV. Sankyo makes a good OEM, that's what
    > went into my Panasonic. The resistors are small 1/10th watt 10 ohm
    > (usually) tied into the circuit grid of the STK. These sometimes open
    > when the STK shorts as a fuseable to protect other components since
    > the STK is the most failure prone device behind the CRT.
    >
    > I strongly advise getting someone to R&R these devices for you if you
    > have no PCB solder skills or you will be calling the trashman to haul
    > it away if you mess up the foil patterns trying to desolder and screw
    > up the new chips or tv with solder bridges if you ever get that far.
    >
    >


    Yes, Thank-you very much. I appreciate the kindness of strangers.Which is
    almost all of Usenet. :)

    We'll see. I will take a trip into a local repair shop later today and chat
    the gentleman up. Just getting the board out might be an ordeal. Although it
    looked as though mostly connecters to disconnect and screws to unscrew
    verses anything much harder than that.

    And likely the other components are bad too, something I am not really
    equipped to handle. But I do have a few options available. Whole boards are
    available for about $100 bucks I'm told. Training on some old PCB (as I've
    been a computer dick for 15 years now I prolly have a few dozen to muck
    around with) seems "do-able". And the oscilloscope seems a little silly. Pun
    intended. But I always wondered what all those positions on the multi-meter
    were for. Maybe a little self-learning is in order.

    Oh, the STKs are 392. Off by one... LOL good guess.

    Stone Temple Pilots, oh, a little after my time. More of a Steely Dan type
    of fan.
     
    ng_reader, Oct 1, 2009
    #18
  19. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    <snip>
    > STK392-110 perhaps? Pretty much the defacto replacement along with the
    > 393 for a certain size screen. Different number translate into
    > different voltage and current/wattage ratings.


    STK392-560, i think a link under separate cover may have been sent...

    >
    > Proper reinstallation paying attention to mounting against the heat
    > sink is vital in a lasting fix. Those babies dissipate a lot of heat
    > and are commonly under-torqued back to the sink. After a period of
    > time I've noticed that the screws tend to walk loose on their own due
    > to heat/cool cycles no doubt. A dab of nail polish on the top or
    > Loctite on the threads cures that.


    Found a local guy that does TV repair. Dying breed, for sure. He'll come to
    the abode and warranty his work or I can drop the board off and no warranty.
    I think if I drop the board off it's a lot less, too.

    We'll see how it goes. Thanks for all the good advice. I may just take a
    "stab".

    >
    >>Stone Temple Pilots, oh, a little after my time. More of a Steely Dan type
    >>of fan.
    >>

    >
    > Different Genres, music really is timeless if you think about it.


    I did, and you're right.
     
    ng_reader, Oct 1, 2009
    #19
  20. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    Oh, and just as a follow up for anyone looking to find those easily found
    STK392-560; find a reputable organization.

    The two mail order places have proved to be very unreliable. Blue Star
    Online and then another foolish outfit called Liberty Electronics.

    Meat Puppet, once I get my credit card payments charged back it's off to
    http://www.mcmelectronics.com/

    They come highly recommended.
     
    ng_reader, Oct 13, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Yellow Submarine

    hard drive circuit board

    Yellow Submarine, Sep 29, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    4,553
    leon2046
    Nov 17, 2010
  2. Wanted: Nikon 995 CF Board for repair

    , Aug 1, 2005, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    299
  3. Lori
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,081
    sandy58
    Oct 30, 2007
  4. The Bit Bandit

    Sample Circuit Board Scam?

    The Bit Bandit, Aug 23, 2004, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    357
    Malcolm
    Aug 24, 2004
  5. Otis Cooper

    Using Computer Repair Dvds For Your PC Repair Business

    Otis Cooper, Feb 5, 2008, in forum: A+ Certification
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,864
    Otis Cooper
    Feb 5, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page