Print Quality questions

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike S., Jul 23, 2006.

  1. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    Is it best to check your photos at the store before you pay for them to
    make sure the quality is ok? No one I know has ever done that but today
    when I went to pick up my prints, I saw a sign that the lab was having
    problems with the equipment so they couldn't process any pictures. It
    made me wonder if my pictures would be affected by that. So, is there
    something I should look for on the prints to make sure they're ok? I've
    never had digital pictures developed or printed before. We always used
    110 film and 35mm film and the quality of the prints was often
    questionable.
    Mike S., Jul 23, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mike S. <> wrote:
    : Is it best to check your photos at the store before you pay for them to
    : make sure the quality is ok? No one I know has ever done that but today
    : when I went to pick up my prints, I saw a sign that the lab was having
    : problems with the equipment so they couldn't process any pictures. It
    : made me wonder if my pictures would be affected by that. So, is there
    : something I should look for on the prints to make sure they're ok? I've
    : never had digital pictures developed or printed before. We always used
    : 110 film and 35mm film and the quality of the prints was often
    : questionable.

    Well first there is no "development" with digital photos. And as to the
    printing process having a glitch, the best way to spot it is to look at
    the prints. If there is something wrong it will be visible. If you are
    asking if the images that have been transferred from your memory card to a
    CD along with the printing process has a problem, there is a very easy way
    to prevent this possible problem. Do the transfer yourself. If your camera
    has a USB cable you can just plug the camera into your home computer and
    copy the images to your hard drive (and later burn to a CD for backup). Or
    you can get a very cheap card reader that you can put the card from your
    camera into and copy the files that way. Either way the copy will then be
    guaranteed to be the exact same quality as your camera took.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 23, 2006
    #2
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  3. Mike S.

    m Ransley Guest

    Always look before you pay, some cheap places dont relpace the
    chemicals on schedule, Ive had dark or redened photos given to me. Photo
    labs vary in quality.
    m Ransley, Jul 23, 2006
    #3
  4. In article <>, Mike
    S. <> wrote:

    > Is it best to check your photos at the store before you pay for them to
    > make sure the quality is ok? No one I know has ever done that but today
    > when I went to pick up my prints, I saw a sign that the lab was having
    > problems with the equipment so they couldn't process any pictures. It
    > made me wonder if my pictures would be affected by that. So, is there
    > something I should look for on the prints to make sure they're ok? I've
    > never had digital pictures developed or printed before. We always used
    > 110 film and 35mm film and the quality of the prints was often
    > questionable.


    The quality of 110 was always questionable.
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 23, 2006
    #4
  5. Mike S.

    jeremy Guest

    "m Ransley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Always look before you pay, some cheap places dont relpace the
    > chemicals on schedule, Ive had dark or redened photos given to me. Photo
    > labs vary in quality.
    >


    Kodak Photo Kiosks use a dye sublimation printer, that has a replaceable
    ribbon. When the ribbon runs out, it must be replaced or the kiosk cannot
    make any more prints. I hadn't given it any thought previously, but that
    method of printing does ensure that the vendor cannot try to squeeze more
    prints out and shortchange the consumer.
    jeremy, Jul 23, 2006
    #5
  6. ? "Mike S." <> ?????? ??? ??????
    news:...
    > Is it best to check your photos at the store before you pay for them to
    > make sure the quality is ok? No one I know has ever done that but today
    > when I went to pick up my prints, I saw a sign that the lab was having
    > problems with the equipment so they couldn't process any pictures. It
    > made me wonder if my pictures would be affected by that. So, is there
    > something I should look for on the prints to make sure they're ok? I've
    > never had digital pictures developed or printed before. We always used
    > 110 film and 35mm film and the quality of the prints was often
    > questionable.
    >

    you'll find out that with digital you'll be getting much better photos than
    with film, because digital cameras do automatically adjust the white balance
    and the sensor has much greater exposure latitude than film and the
    in-camera processing of the snapshots gives them more acutance.


    --
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    major in electrical engineering,freelance electrician
    542nd mechanized infantry batallion
    dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Jul 23, 2006
    #6
  7. Mike S.

    Hebee Jeebes Guest

    Look before you pay. If you don't like a print make them do it again.

    R


    "Mike S." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is it best to check your photos at the store before you pay for them to
    > make sure the quality is ok? No one I know has ever done that but today
    > when I went to pick up my prints, I saw a sign that the lab was having
    > problems with the equipment so they couldn't process any pictures. It
    > made me wonder if my pictures would be affected by that. So, is there
    > something I should look for on the prints to make sure they're ok? I've
    > never had digital pictures developed or printed before. We always used
    > 110 film and 35mm film and the quality of the prints was often
    > questionable.
    >
    Hebee Jeebes, Jul 23, 2006
    #7
  8. Mike S.

    Hebee Jeebes Guest

    Randy you are wrong. There you can get your digital prints one of two ways.
    Either from a lab that uses a printer like a dye sub or something (kiosks
    uses these always) or you can get them chemically processed just like film
    would be. My local shutterbug store offers it both ways. I always go for the
    chemical prints, it is a more manual process and I don't have to worry about
    auto guessing software trying to decide if the grass should be green or the
    sky. The chemical prints are a little more expensive because of the man
    power involved.

    R


    "Randy Berbaum" <> wrote in message
    news:e9vbmu$e4a$...
    > Mike S. <> wrote:
    > : Is it best to check your photos at the store before you pay for them to
    > : make sure the quality is ok? No one I know has ever done that but today
    > : when I went to pick up my prints, I saw a sign that the lab was having
    > : problems with the equipment so they couldn't process any pictures. It
    > : made me wonder if my pictures would be affected by that. So, is there
    > : something I should look for on the prints to make sure they're ok? I've
    > : never had digital pictures developed or printed before. We always used
    > : 110 film and 35mm film and the quality of the prints was often
    > : questionable.
    >
    > Well first there is no "development" with digital photos. And as to the
    > printing process having a glitch, the best way to spot it is to look at
    > the prints. If there is something wrong it will be visible. If you are
    > asking if the images that have been transferred from your memory card to a
    > CD along with the printing process has a problem, there is a very easy way
    > to prevent this possible problem. Do the transfer yourself. If your camera
    > has a USB cable you can just plug the camera into your home computer and
    > copy the images to your hard drive (and later burn to a CD for backup). Or
    > you can get a very cheap card reader that you can put the card from your
    > camera into and copy the files that way. Either way the copy will then be
    > guaranteed to be the exact same quality as your camera took.
    >
    > Randy
    >
    > ==========
    > Randy Berbaum
    > Champaign, IL
    >
    Hebee Jeebes, Jul 23, 2006
    #8
  9. Hebee Jeebes <> wrote:
    : Randy you are wrong. There you can get your digital prints one of two
    : ways. Either from a lab that uses a printer like a dye sub or
    : something (kiosks uses these always) or you can get them chemically
    : processed just like film would be. My local shutterbug store offers it
    : both ways. I always go for the chemical prints, it is a more manual
    : process and I don't have to worry about auto guessing software trying
    : to decide if the grass should be green or the sky. The chemical prints
    : are a little more expensive because of the man power involved.

    Maybe we are talking about two different things. To me, "developing"
    involves taking a storage media holding a virtual image and dunking it in
    chemicals to make the virtual image visible (like is done with film). I
    would think that taking an SD card and immersing it in a pan of chemicals
    would not likely cause it to bring forth visual images. :) On the other
    hand, you are correct that there are many different types of printing
    processes. Some may involve chemical developers.

    The way I read the original post it seemed to me that the OP was used to
    taking a roll of film to a store to have the film developed and got photos
    back. But when they changed to digital they still think they have to take
    the "digital film" to a store to have it "developed". I was just pointing
    out that the "digital film" from the camera does not require someone in a
    lab to develop the images. The only thing that is done when a digital
    camera is taken to the store is that the images on the memory card are
    printed (by one process or another) and in some cases transferred to a CD.
    Some of these transfers are direct copys from the memory card and some
    seem to be processed in some way and so may be smaller image files than
    the original. Of course, since I do all my own downloading of image data,
    editing, and printing of my images I am inexperienced in what these
    "digital photo labs" (at the level of your local Walmart) actually do. If
    my understanding of their "processing" is incorrect I will gladly bow to
    anyone with direct experience. :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 24, 2006
    #9
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