Prerequisites

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by SewerRat, Sep 14, 2004.

  1. SewerRat

    SewerRat Guest

    I'm looking into MCSD.NET certification and wondering what
    an appropriate course of study for someone of my
    background might be. I have a Bachelor of computer
    science that I completed in the early 90's with virtually
    no OOP coursework. I'm an NT MCSE and a CCNA employed as
    a Network Administrator. I'm ready for a change.

    I just bought the MS Core Training kit for .NET and it
    seems to assume I know quite a bit of C# or Visual Basic.
    Can someone reccommend a decent text that would serve me
    well as a primer for the Training Kit and also be a good
    C# reference down the line. Also, if you feel there are
    other prerequisite studies I should do, let me know what
    those might be. Thanks in advance for your replies.
     
    SewerRat, Sep 14, 2004
    #1
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  2. SewerRat

    Brad Guest

    Actually if you start with the Windows Applications book from the kit it
    covers most of the major elements of C# or VB programming for a beginner,
    just give it a chance. But I'm not saying its entirely thorough, and if
    you're weak on OO then you may want to start with a regular text that goes
    over OOP in some detail. Petzold (you know, the Win32 guru) writes
    introductory-style texts for C#. If you're rusty on programming that's
    probably you're best route. There are also a little bit better books with
    more substance targeted toward more experienced persons, like "Inside C#,
    Second Ed." or "C#.NET, Second Ed." and others. For VB I don't know, I try
    not to do VB unless I have to. Also use the VS.NET documentation and read
    MSDN. You also need to learn some SQL and even a little about Microsoft's
    SQL Server and IIS 5.0/6.0 products. Some XML knowledge won't hurt either.
    For general SQL you might try the "SQL Bible", or for more Transact-SQL
    oriented the "SQL Server 2000 Bible" from the same series, or you could just
    read from the SQL Server Books Online, or any number of other SQL or SQL
    Server books. There's not much to IIS from a pure development standpoint,
    but you need to understand virtual directories a little when you get into
    ASP.NET and web services. You can used the evaluation versions of Visual
    Studio.NET 2003 and SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition, but that only gives
    you 90 days. If you enroll in a college course you can get academic pricing
    on VS.NET Professional for only $100. The individual products (C#.NET,
    VB.NET) can be purchased academically for $60, or $100 off-the-shelf.
    There's also SQL Server 2000 Developer Edition, same features as Enterprise
    Edition, costs only $50 I think.

    Hope some of this helps.


    "SewerRat" <> wrote in message
    news:0d8001c49a8e$eb8ee2e0$...
    > I'm looking into MCSD.NET certification and wondering what
    > an appropriate course of study for someone of my
    > background might be. I have a Bachelor of computer
    > science that I completed in the early 90's with virtually
    > no OOP coursework. I'm an NT MCSE and a CCNA employed as
    > a Network Administrator. I'm ready for a change.
    >
    > I just bought the MS Core Training kit for .NET and it
    > seems to assume I know quite a bit of C# or Visual Basic.
    > Can someone reccommend a decent text that would serve me
    > well as a primer for the Training Kit and also be a good
    > C# reference down the line. Also, if you feel there are
    > other prerequisite studies I should do, let me know what
    > those might be. Thanks in advance for your replies.
     
    Brad, Sep 14, 2004
    #2
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  3. SewerRat

    Hermit Dave Guest

    yeap right on most counts.
    Inside C# is a fairly decent book to start with.. got mine with beta 2 from
    MS and it did the job.. 2nd edition has easier language (readablity) and
    examples that work (the examples in 1st ed were beta 2 centric and a few
    things had changed)

    use MSDN for reference. it has save me a lot of nights. plus its handy.. and
    ofcourse nothing compares to books onlie on SQL Server.
    I have used Inside SQL but i think it has a lot of arch overview so you
    might not find enough details on Data Definition / Manipulation language ie
    TSQL
    Get your hands on VS.NET 2003 and SQL Server 2000 to begin with. How and
    which version you get is your choice.

    I would say if you can manage it go for C# - its cleaner code. it has
    beautify of C / C++ and ease of VB (without the ugliness)

    VB.NET reminds me of VB and i keep a safe distance using a code converter to
    help other people :)
    C++.net again reminds me of C++ but more extensions bolted on.

    and if you have any queries just give us a shout.
    --

    Regards,

    Hermit Dave
    (http://hdave.blogspot.com)
    "Brad" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Actually if you start with the Windows Applications book from the kit it
    > covers most of the major elements of C# or VB programming for a beginner,
    > just give it a chance. But I'm not saying its entirely thorough, and if
    > you're weak on OO then you may want to start with a regular text that goes
    > over OOP in some detail. Petzold (you know, the Win32 guru) writes
    > introductory-style texts for C#. If you're rusty on programming that's
    > probably you're best route. There are also a little bit better books with
    > more substance targeted toward more experienced persons, like "Inside C#,
    > Second Ed." or "C#.NET, Second Ed." and others. For VB I don't know, I

    try
    > not to do VB unless I have to. Also use the VS.NET documentation and read
    > MSDN. You also need to learn some SQL and even a little about Microsoft's
    > SQL Server and IIS 5.0/6.0 products. Some XML knowledge won't hurt

    either.
    > For general SQL you might try the "SQL Bible", or for more Transact-SQL
    > oriented the "SQL Server 2000 Bible" from the same series, or you could

    just
    > read from the SQL Server Books Online, or any number of other SQL or SQL
    > Server books. There's not much to IIS from a pure development standpoint,
    > but you need to understand virtual directories a little when you get into
    > ASP.NET and web services. You can used the evaluation versions of Visual
    > Studio.NET 2003 and SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition, but that only

    gives
    > you 90 days. If you enroll in a college course you can get academic

    pricing
    > on VS.NET Professional for only $100. The individual products (C#.NET,
    > VB.NET) can be purchased academically for $60, or $100 off-the-shelf.
    > There's also SQL Server 2000 Developer Edition, same features as

    Enterprise
    > Edition, costs only $50 I think.
    >
    > Hope some of this helps.
    >
    >
    > "SewerRat" <> wrote in message
    > news:0d8001c49a8e$eb8ee2e0$...
    > > I'm looking into MCSD.NET certification and wondering what
    > > an appropriate course of study for someone of my
    > > background might be. I have a Bachelor of computer
    > > science that I completed in the early 90's with virtually
    > > no OOP coursework. I'm an NT MCSE and a CCNA employed as
    > > a Network Administrator. I'm ready for a change.
    > >
    > > I just bought the MS Core Training kit for .NET and it
    > > seems to assume I know quite a bit of C# or Visual Basic.
    > > Can someone reccommend a decent text that would serve me
    > > well as a primer for the Training Kit and also be a good
    > > C# reference down the line. Also, if you feel there are
    > > other prerequisite studies I should do, let me know what
    > > those might be. Thanks in advance for your replies.

    >
    >
     
    Hermit Dave, Sep 14, 2004
    #3
  4. SewerRat

    SewerRat Guest

    Thanks much for taking the time to reply. Glad this forum
    is alive. I am sure it will come in as handy as it has
    already. I am currently working on SQL 2000 and IIS here,
    so I've got some experience with those. I'll probably
    pick up a copy of Inside c#, 2nd Ed for a primer on C#
    since both of you mentioned it. I get academic pricing on
    all my software here so I can avoid college coursework
    (kind of like I did for the 7 years I was in college) and
    still get the discounts. Thanks again!

    >-----Original Message-----
    >I'm looking into MCSD.NET certification and wondering

    what
    >an appropriate course of study for someone of my
    >background might be. I have a Bachelor of computer
    >science that I completed in the early 90's with virtually
    >no OOP coursework. I'm an NT MCSE and a CCNA employed as
    >a Network Administrator. I'm ready for a change.
    >
    >I just bought the MS Core Training kit for .NET and it
    >seems to assume I know quite a bit of C# or Visual

    Basic.
    >Can someone reccommend a decent text that would serve me
    >well as a primer for the Training Kit and also be a good
    >C# reference down the line. Also, if you feel there are
    >other prerequisite studies I should do, let me know what
    >those might be. Thanks in advance for your replies.
    >.
    >
     
    SewerRat, Sep 15, 2004
    #4
  5. SewerRat

    Brad Guest

    Here's another little something you might find useful, if you have broadband
    access of some sort. About as good as any CBT out there I imagine, and its
    totally free. If you attend live, and there are several coming up, you can
    even ask questions. Great for you, or any beginners around here. They'll
    even get into some advanced stuff.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/msdnwebcasts/archive/2004/09/07/226144.aspx



    "SewerRat" <> wrote in message
    news:160001c49b2b$80dd9200$...
    > Thanks much for taking the time to reply. Glad this forum
    > is alive. I am sure it will come in as handy as it has
    > already. I am currently working on SQL 2000 and IIS here,
    > so I've got some experience with those. I'll probably
    > pick up a copy of Inside c#, 2nd Ed for a primer on C#
    > since both of you mentioned it. I get academic pricing on
    > all my software here so I can avoid college coursework
    > (kind of like I did for the 7 years I was in college) and
    > still get the discounts. Thanks again!
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >I'm looking into MCSD.NET certification and wondering

    > what
    > >an appropriate course of study for someone of my
    > >background might be. I have a Bachelor of computer
    > >science that I completed in the early 90's with virtually
    > >no OOP coursework. I'm an NT MCSE and a CCNA employed as
    > >a Network Administrator. I'm ready for a change.
    > >
    > >I just bought the MS Core Training kit for .NET and it
    > >seems to assume I know quite a bit of C# or Visual

    > Basic.
    > >Can someone reccommend a decent text that would serve me
    > >well as a primer for the Training Kit and also be a good
    > >C# reference down the line. Also, if you feel there are
    > >other prerequisite studies I should do, let me know what
    > >those might be. Thanks in advance for your replies.
    > >.
    > >
     
    Brad, Sep 15, 2004
    #5
  6. SewerRat

    Brad Guest

    And for anyone else reading this, in case you didn't know, I forgot to
    mention, as far as academic pricing, more and more colleges are joining
    MSDNAA. If you take a single semester technology course (generally computer
    science topic) at an MSDNAA participating school or university, you
    generally receive access to their MSDNAA library, which will almost
    certainly include downloadable academic copies of VS.NET, SQL Server,
    Windows Server 2003, WinXP, Win2000 and dozens of other MS products. Its a
    great deal!

    "Brad" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Actually if you start with the Windows Applications book from the kit it
    > covers most of the major elements of C# or VB programming for a beginner,
    > just give it a chance. But I'm not saying its entirely thorough, and if
    > you're weak on OO then you may want to start with a regular text that goes
    > over OOP in some detail. Petzold (you know, the Win32 guru) writes
    > introductory-style texts for C#. If you're rusty on programming that's
    > probably you're best route. There are also a little bit better books with
    > more substance targeted toward more experienced persons, like "Inside C#,
    > Second Ed." or "C#.NET, Second Ed." and others. For VB I don't know, I

    try
    > not to do VB unless I have to. Also use the VS.NET documentation and read
    > MSDN. You also need to learn some SQL and even a little about Microsoft's
    > SQL Server and IIS 5.0/6.0 products. Some XML knowledge won't hurt

    either.
    > For general SQL you might try the "SQL Bible", or for more Transact-SQL
    > oriented the "SQL Server 2000 Bible" from the same series, or you could

    just
    > read from the SQL Server Books Online, or any number of other SQL or SQL
    > Server books. There's not much to IIS from a pure development standpoint,
    > but you need to understand virtual directories a little when you get into
    > ASP.NET and web services. You can used the evaluation versions of Visual
    > Studio.NET 2003 and SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition, but that only

    gives
    > you 90 days. If you enroll in a college course you can get academic

    pricing
    > on VS.NET Professional for only $100. The individual products (C#.NET,
    > VB.NET) can be purchased academically for $60, or $100 off-the-shelf.
    > There's also SQL Server 2000 Developer Edition, same features as

    Enterprise
    > Edition, costs only $50 I think.
    >
    > Hope some of this helps.
    >
    >
    > "SewerRat" <> wrote in message
    > news:0d8001c49a8e$eb8ee2e0$...
    > > I'm looking into MCSD.NET certification and wondering what
    > > an appropriate course of study for someone of my
    > > background might be. I have a Bachelor of computer
    > > science that I completed in the early 90's with virtually
    > > no OOP coursework. I'm an NT MCSE and a CCNA employed as
    > > a Network Administrator. I'm ready for a change.
    > >
    > > I just bought the MS Core Training kit for .NET and it
    > > seems to assume I know quite a bit of C# or Visual Basic.
    > > Can someone reccommend a decent text that would serve me
    > > well as a primer for the Training Kit and also be a good
    > > C# reference down the line. Also, if you feel there are
    > > other prerequisite studies I should do, let me know what
    > > those might be. Thanks in advance for your replies.

    >
    >
     
    Brad, Sep 15, 2004
    #6
  7. SewerRat

    bb Guest

    SewerRat wrote:

    > I'm looking into MCSD.NET certification and wondering what
    > an appropriate course of study for someone of my
    > background might be. I have a Bachelor of computer
    > science that I completed in the early 90's with virtually
    > no OOP coursework. I'm an NT MCSE and a CCNA employed as
    > a Network Administrator. I'm ready for a change.
    >
    > I just bought the MS Core Training kit for .NET and it
    > seems to assume I know quite a bit of C# or Visual Basic.
    > Can someone reccommend a decent text that would serve me
    > well as a primer for the Training Kit and also be a good
    > C# reference down the line. Also, if you feel there are
    > other prerequisite studies I should do, let me know what
    > those might be. Thanks in advance for your replies.


    theres a good pre-req pseudo questionnaire at the beginning of the Exam
    Cram2 MCSD book, where they ask about 60 yes/no questions of your
    background and skills profile, and based on the number of yes responses
    gauge your current suitability. its not an exact science, but i did find
    that it rang quite true for me.

    i would paste them here, but i think they would probably appreciate it
    more if you went out and bought (what i consider is a preety good) book.



    --
    ------------------------
    Think your smart?
    Prove your programming power @ the OSI Geek Challenges
    http://www.osix.net
    ------------------------
     
    bb, Sep 16, 2004
    #7
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