prediction: non-PSTN mobile phones

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by Kyler Laird, Aug 26, 2004.

  1. Kyler Laird

    Kyler Laird Guest

    I'll be thrilled if someone points out that this is already available,
    but I predict that someone will start offering inexpensive mobile
    phone service by providing VoIP instead of PSTN interconnection. This
    should decrease costs dramatically and free the provider from a bunch
    of regulations imposed for using the PSTN.

    Anyone know of any movement in this direction? I would expect it from
    someone like Nextel.

    Thank you.

    --kyler
    Kyler Laird, Aug 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. In <> Kyler Laird <> writes:

    >I'll be thrilled if someone points out that this is already available,
    >but I predict that someone will start offering inexpensive mobile
    >phone service by providing VoIP instead of PSTN interconnection. This
    >should decrease costs dramatically and free the provider from a bunch
    >of regulations imposed for using the PSTN.


    >Anyone know of any movement in this direction? I would expect it from
    >someone like Nextel.


    you've almost already got it. check out the "mobile to mobile" rates,
    which typically give you unlimited connect time for $10 or so (above a
    basic subscription cost).


    --
    _____________________________________________________
    Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key

    [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
    danny burstein, Aug 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. Kyler Laird

    Kyler Laird Guest

    danny burstein <> writes:

    >you've almost already got it. check out the "mobile to mobile" rates,
    >which typically give you unlimited connect time for $10 or so (above a
    >basic subscription cost).


    Yeah, but all of the taxes and junk for the PSTN line (including DID
    service) are in there. And there's not nearly as much flexibility. I
    can't easily, for example, have incoming calls to the "house" number
    ring both me and my wife on our mobiles and then be recorded in a
    common mailbox if we don't answer. That would require disabling voice
    mail on both our mobiles. Then calls directly to the mobiles would
    not get answered.

    Whacky configurations like this would be easy to implement if I could
    just handle my own incoming calls and treat mobile phones like
    extensions. Going back and forth over the PSTN to accomplish this is
    incredibly inefficient...and expensive.

    I think normal people could get a lot of use from such a service too.
    It would provide lots of flexibility. For many people, just calling
    within their group would be sufficient and having really cheap lines
    (one for each family member) would be worthwhile. For some, having
    DID service in several countries might be handy.

    You're right, though, I did start thinking about this after getting
    equipment to hook a cheap "additional line" (for an additional
    ~$10/month from my mobile phone provider) up to my VoIP box. (I
    can't get calling party control for my hard line and I can't get
    decent VoIP DID service in my area.) The free mobile-to-mobile time
    will certainly figure into my dialplan.

    --kyler
    Kyler Laird, Aug 27, 2004
    #3
  4. Kyler Laird

    Ankur Shah Guest

    danny burstein wrote:
    > In <> Kyler Laird <> writes:
    >
    >
    >>I'll be thrilled if someone points out that this is already available,
    >>but I predict that someone will start offering inexpensive mobile
    >>phone service by providing VoIP instead of PSTN interconnection. This
    >>should decrease costs dramatically and free the provider from a bunch
    >>of regulations imposed for using the PSTN.

    >
    >
    >>Anyone know of any movement in this direction? I would expect it from
    >>someone like Nextel.

    >
    >
    > you've almost already got it. check out the "mobile to mobile" rates,
    > which typically give you unlimited connect time for $10 or so (above a
    > basic subscription cost).
    >
    >


    The "mobile to mobile" calls aren't technically VoIP by nature. They're
    more like "on-net" calls -- originating and terminating on the
    provider's network -- whereby they're practically free for the wireless
    provider.

    -- A
    Ankur Shah, Aug 27, 2004
    #4
  5. Kyler Laird

    Tony P. Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > I'll be thrilled if someone points out that this is already available,
    > but I predict that someone will start offering inexpensive mobile
    > phone service by providing VoIP instead of PSTN interconnection. This
    > should decrease costs dramatically and free the provider from a bunch
    > of regulations imposed for using the PSTN.
    >
    > Anyone know of any movement in this direction? I would expect it from
    > someone like Nextel.
    >
    > Thank you.


    There are a fair number of telephone out there that use the 802.11
    protocol, as well as a fair number of open nodes that could be persuaded
    to open up ports for VoIP. It sure puts a crimp in the PSTN
    architecture. But it would only work well in cities. Open land would
    require WAPs to be placed every so often to maintain connectivity.

    The only saving grace I can see to that is the fact that 802.11 can be
    made to run at distances of > 10 miles with certain antenna designs. So
    while one 802.11 WAP would have an omnidirectional antenna to server
    VoIP handsets, another would relay the calls to the next access point
    and so on.
    Tony P., Aug 28, 2004
    #5
  6. Kyler Laird

    Tony P. Guest

    In article <cglnc0$1ff$>, says...
    > In <> Kyler Laird <> writes:
    >
    > >I'll be thrilled if someone points out that this is already available,
    > >but I predict that someone will start offering inexpensive mobile
    > >phone service by providing VoIP instead of PSTN interconnection. This
    > >should decrease costs dramatically and free the provider from a bunch
    > >of regulations imposed for using the PSTN.

    >
    > >Anyone know of any movement in this direction? I would expect it from
    > >someone like Nextel.

    >
    > you've almost already got it. check out the "mobile to mobile" rates,
    > which typically give you unlimited connect time for $10 or so (above a
    > basic subscription cost).
    >
    >
    >



    But imagine $10 a month for the service and .02 or so per call. No per
    minute just per call. Makine 100 calls would add $2.00 to the bill. Oh,
    did I mention incoming calls would be free?

    Right now paying $39.99 a month for 1000 minutes and free nights and
    weekends is gouging.
    Tony P., Aug 28, 2004
    #6
  7. Kyler Laird

    Tony P. Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > danny burstein <> writes:
    >
    > >you've almost already got it. check out the "mobile to mobile" rates,
    > >which typically give you unlimited connect time for $10 or so (above a
    > >basic subscription cost).

    >
    > Yeah, but all of the taxes and junk for the PSTN line (including DID
    > service) are in there. And there's not nearly as much flexibility. I
    > can't easily, for example, have incoming calls to the "house" number
    > ring both me and my wife on our mobiles and then be recorded in a
    > common mailbox if we don't answer. That would require disabling voice
    > mail on both our mobiles. Then calls directly to the mobiles would
    > not get answered.
    >
    > Whacky configurations like this would be easy to implement if I could
    > just handle my own incoming calls and treat mobile phones like
    > extensions. Going back and forth over the PSTN to accomplish this is
    > incredibly inefficient...and expensive.
    >
    > I think normal people could get a lot of use from such a service too.
    > It would provide lots of flexibility. For many people, just calling
    > within their group would be sufficient and having really cheap lines
    > (one for each family member) would be worthwhile. For some, having
    > DID service in several countries might be handy.
    >
    > You're right, though, I did start thinking about this after getting
    > equipment to hook a cheap "additional line" (for an additional
    > ~$10/month from my mobile phone provider) up to my VoIP box. (I
    > can't get calling party control for my hard line and I can't get
    > decent VoIP DID service in my area.) The free mobile-to-mobile time
    > will certainly figure into my dialplan.


    BTW - one company has already figured part of the equation out. Vocera
    offers a solution that takes advantage of already in place WAP.

    http://www.vocera.com/products/products.shtm

    I would really love to give this product a shot but the building we're
    in is all steel, brick and marble. We'd have to put access points in
    every room and that's counterproductive when we already have CAT-5 for
    voice and data to every seat.

    Oh well.
    Tony P., Aug 28, 2004
    #7
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