Power supply test.

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Xeno Chauvin, Jun 2, 2004.

  1. Xeno Chauvin

    Xeno Chauvin Guest

    How can one test an ATX power supply?
    I don't have another board to plug it in to, so, can I short the "Power
    Switch" lead
    to get it to turn on? My momentary switch is O.K.. but I get no power.
    Xeno
     
    Xeno Chauvin, Jun 2, 2004
    #1
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  2. Xeno Chauvin

    Toolman Tim Guest

    http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=115 3112

    "Xeno Chauvin" <> wrote in message
    news:zecvc.46017$...
    > How can one test an ATX power supply?
    > I don't have another board to plug it in to, so, can I short the "Power
    > Switch" lead
    > to get it to turn on? My momentary switch is O.K.. but I get no power.
    > Xeno
    >
    >
     
    Toolman Tim, Jun 2, 2004
    #2
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  3. Xeno Chauvin wrote:
    > How can one test an ATX power supply?
    > I don't have another board to plug it in to, so, can I short the "Power
    > Switch" lead
    > to get it to turn on? My momentary switch is O.K.. but I get no power.
    > Xeno
    >
    >

    Many switch mode power supplies will not start up or will
    not produce correct output voltages without a minimum
    (specified) load.

    To properly test an ATX power supply you need to be able to
    increase the load from the minimum to the rated maximum -
    which means that the load will have to dissipate several
    hundred watts. This is going to be quite large - bigger than
    the power supply itself and have forced air cooling. Many so
    called power supply testers just put a load of a few watts
    on the supply and really only show that the supply hasn't
    failed totally. A good tester will also perform transient
    overload tests, simulating the effect of spinning up large
    disks.

    For a quick test, I have an old 5.25" full-height drive that
    I use as a test load. 12 volt and 6 volt car/bike headlamps
    work quite well too and give you some more light to work by..
     
    =?UTF-8?B?UGFsaW5kcuKYu21l?=, Jun 2, 2004
    #3
  4. Xeno Chauvin

    Xeno Chauvin Guest

    "PalindrĂ¢~»me" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Many switch mode power supplies will not start up or will
    > not produce correct output voltages without a minimum
    > (specified) load.\


    O.K. So how do I get the "switch mode" to come On so I can
    put it under a load?
    I too have an old 5 1/2 in floppy I can test it with....my problem is I
    can't tell IF I have a dead power supply or a dead MB.
    Xeno
     
    Xeno Chauvin, Jun 2, 2004
    #4
  5. Xeno Chauvin

    larry.fatcat Guest

    Its not very technical but have you tried turning it on and watching if any
    of the fans move.

    You could also look at the PSU internal fuse.

    Larry

    "Xeno Chauvin" <> wrote in message
    news:zecvc.46017$...
    > How can one test an ATX power supply?
    > I don't have another board to plug it in to, so, can I short the "Power
    > Switch" lead
    > to get it to turn on? My momentary switch is O.K.. but I get no power.
    > Xeno
    >
    >
     
    larry.fatcat, Jun 2, 2004
    #5
  6. Xeno Chauvin

    Xeno Chauvin Guest

    "larry.fatcat" <> wrote in message
    news:Curvc.798$...
    > Its not very technical but have you tried turning it on and watching if

    any
    > of the fans move.


    The fans will only move if I blow on them.
    >
    > You could also look at the PSU internal fuse.

    Not this puppy....the last time I got curious about a power supply I hit the
    capacitor
    and scared the fecal matter out of me.
    But thanks for the thoughts.
    >
    > Larry
     
    Xeno Chauvin, Jun 3, 2004
    #6
  7. Xeno Chauvin

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Xeno Chauvin" <> wrote in message
    news:iBwvc.50079$...
    >
    > "larry.fatcat" <> wrote in message
    > news:Curvc.798$...
    > > Its not very technical but have you tried turning it on and watching if

    > any
    > > of the fans move.

    >
    > The fans will only move if I blow on them.
    > >
    > > You could also look at the PSU internal fuse.

    > Not this puppy....the last time I got curious about a power supply I hit

    the
    > capacitor
    > and scared the fecal matter out of me.
    > But thanks for the thoughts.
    >

    I've not had much luck on "just a fuse" with power supplys lately...

    Your best bet is "parts substitution". At my house (and at work) I always
    have an extra PC around that I can "borrow" a part from. Of course, I have
    new spare parts and other tools as well (I *am* the Toolman <g>) like a POST
    card for the motherboard which also has LEDs showing whether or not voltages
    are correct. Plus there is the plug-in tester for bench testing PSs like the
    one I posted earlier. So you could also drop it by the local shop - they're
    likely to have the same thing, and get you an answer in a minute or two.
     
    Toolman Tim, Jun 3, 2004
    #7
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