Power Supply keeps blowing?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Chicagorush, Jul 2, 2007.

  1. Chicagorush

    Chicagorush Guest

    I currently have been having issues with my power supply. Well to
    start off this is my second power supply in 2 months that i've gone
    through because both have blown on me. I don't know what is going on,
    I do leave my computer on during the night while i'm sleeping.

    My computer specs are:

    Asus A8N-SLI Premium
    AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Manchester 2.2GHz 2 x 512KB L2 Cache Socket 939
    Processor
    (4) 512mb Corsair Value Memory - VS512MB400C3
    Maxtor 300gb Diamond Max 10 Hard drive
    (2) XFX 7600gt GeForce 4 256mb Graphics card with SLI enabled on
    both.

    Power Supplies that i've gone through already:

    450w Ultra X-Connect
    550w Guardian Power Supply

    Both power supplies have blown on me. The Ultra has lasted me about a
    year and a half. The guardian I had originally had on my system when i
    first built it was for about 6 months then when my ultra died on me it
    lasted me for another 2 months.

    If anyone can help me answer why both have blown on me or can help me
    figure out how to prevent the next one i get from taking a dump that
    would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Chicagorush, Jul 2, 2007
    #1
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  2. Chicagorush

    Vanguard Guest

    "Chicagorush" wrote in message
    news:...
    > I currently have been having issues with my power supply. Well to
    > start off this is my second power supply in 2 months that i've gone
    > through because both have blown on me. I don't know what is going on,
    > I do leave my computer on during the night while i'm sleeping.
    >
    > My computer specs are:
    >
    > Asus A8N-SLI Premium
    > AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Manchester 2.2GHz 2 x 512KB L2 Cache Socket 939
    > Processor
    > (4) 512mb Corsair Value Memory - VS512MB400C3
    > Maxtor 300gb Diamond Max 10 Hard drive
    > (2) XFX 7600gt GeForce 4 256mb Graphics card with SLI enabled on
    > both.
    >
    > Power Supplies that i've gone through already:
    >
    > 450w Ultra X-Connect
    > 550w Guardian Power Supply
    >
    > Both power supplies have blown on me. The Ultra has lasted me about a
    > year and a half. The guardian I had originally had on my system when i
    > first built it was for about 6 months then when my ultra died on me it
    > lasted me for another 2 months.



    So what does "blown" mean to you? That you think a fuse inside blew?
    If so then you are putting in a very undersized power supply and an
    extremely cheap one. From your descriptions of the PSUs, the wattage
    probably is more than enough but you'll be lucky if you if get
    two-thirds the rated wattage for a continuous load with the cheapie
    units. Never heard of the brands you mentioned.
     
    Vanguard, Jul 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. Chicagorush

    Chicagorush Guest

    Blown as in i press the button to turn the computer on and it starts
    up and shuts down within a second. The led lights on my chassis light
    up but shut off right away. I'm not saying a fuse i'm saying it seems
    like something is wrong with the power supply because if i go to turn
    the computer on it doesn't start up just the led's on the chassis
    flicker on then turn off right away nothing else.

    The PSU's i know have been really popular especially on newegg.com and
    tigerdirect.com

    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/category/category_slc.asp?MfrId=1583&CatId=106

    Thats the link to all the ultra power supplies on tigerdirect.com

    What in your opinion is a good power supply for the things i have
    posted as my computer specs.

    I know for a fact the guardian 550w power supply was a cheap one cause
    it was only $25 when i bought it and that was 2 years ago.
     
    Chicagorush, Jul 2, 2007
    #3
  4. Chicagorush

    George H Guest

    Chicagorush wrote:
    > I currently have been having issues with my power supply. Well to
    > start off this is my second power supply in 2 months that i've gone
    > through because both have blown on me. I don't know what is going on,
    > I do leave my computer on during the night while i'm sleeping.
    >
    > My computer specs are:
    >
    > Asus A8N-SLI Premium
    > AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Manchester 2.2GHz 2 x 512KB L2 Cache Socket 939
    > Processor
    > (4) 512mb Corsair Value Memory - VS512MB400C3
    > Maxtor 300gb Diamond Max 10 Hard drive
    > (2) XFX 7600gt GeForce 4 256mb Graphics card with SLI enabled on
    > both.
    >
    > Power Supplies that i've gone through already:
    >
    > 450w Ultra X-Connect
    > 550w Guardian Power Supply
    >
    > Both power supplies have blown on me. The Ultra has lasted me about a
    > year and a half. The guardian I had originally had on my system when i
    > first built it was for about 6 months then when my ultra died on me it
    > lasted me for another 2 months.
    >
    > If anyone can help me answer why both have blown on me or can help me
    > figure out how to prevent the next one i get from taking a dump that
    > would be greatly appreciated.
    >


    http://www.directron.com/guardian550w.html

    If this is the power supply you speak of I'm surprised you got eight
    months out of it.


    The two video cards plus the 4200+ draw a fair bit of current from the
    +12VDC rail(s).

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...=2010320058 50001459&name=Corsair Memory, Inc.

    Buy one of these Corsair PSUs, made by Seasonic.
     
    George H, Jul 2, 2007
    #4
  5. Chicagorush

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > If anyone can help me answer why both have blown on me or can help me
    > figure out how to prevent the next one i get from taking a dump that
    > would be greatly appreciated.


    Try and antec 550W or larger PSU, don't buy those cheap PSU units no
    matter what people review for them.

    --
    Leythos - (remove 999 to email me)

    Learn more about PCBUTTS1 and his antics and ethic and his perversion
    with Porn and Filth. Just take a look at some of the FILTH he's created
    and put on his website: http://www.webservertalk.com/message1907860.html
    3rd link shows what he's exposed to children (the link I've include does
    not directly display his filth). You can find the same information by
    googling for 'PCBUTTS1' and 'exposed to kids'.
     
    Leythos, Jul 2, 2007
    #5
  6. Chicagorush

    Vanguard Guest

    "Chicagorush" wrote in message
    news:...
    > Blown as in i press the button to turn the computer on and it starts
    > up and shuts down within a second. The led lights on my chassis light
    > up but shut off right away. I'm not saying a fuse i'm saying it seems
    > like something is wrong with the power supply because if i go to turn
    > the computer on it doesn't start up just the led's on the chassis
    > flicker on then turn off right away nothing else.



    So what happens when you short the PS-ON signal (green wire) on the
    20-pin mobo header to ground (black wire)? Some PSUs won't power on
    without a load on a power tap so disconnect the PSU from everything
    except one hard drive. If the PSU comes on (you'll see its fan spinning
    and can measure tap voltages) the problem isn't with the PSU (unless the
    load is beyond the *real* capacity of the PSU). If the PSU runs okay by
    itself then try a minimal hardware configuration to test it (mobo, 1
    stick of memory, video card, CPU, and a hard drive, if needed).
     
    Vanguard, Jul 2, 2007
    #6
  7. Chicagorush

    w_tom Guest

    On Jul 1, 11:54 pm, Chicagorush <> wrote:
    > Blown as in i press the button to turn the computer on and it starts
    > up and shuts down within a second. The led lights on my chassis light
    > up but shut off right away. I'm not saying a fuse i'm saying it seems
    > like something is wrong with thepower supplybecause if i go to turn
    > the computer on it doesn't start up just the led's on the chassis
    > flicker on then turn off right away nothing else.


    It seems to be a lot of things. For example, you don't even know if
    the original supply was working properly - was sufficient. A complete
    defective (undersized) supply can make a computer work appear OK for
    months. Without confirming numbers, you were only guessing that the
    second supply was good. And you were also guessing that the original
    problem was inside a first supply.

    It is a power supply 'system'; not just a power supply. Even the
    power supply controller could be defective.

    To get useful replies - answers that go after the problem - answers
    that don't include "it could be this or it could be ....". That means
    definitive numbers from a 3.5 digit multimeter. Those whose life is
    about shotgunning will avidly deny this. However, already
    demonstrated is why a meter was necessary 2 month ago and why the
    meter will be necessary after parts have been replaced.

    The meter is a $20 item even sold in K-mart, Sears, Wal-Mart, Lowes,
    Radio Shack, Tru-Value Hardware, Home Depot ... almost everywhere that
    screwdrivers are sold. A tool that simple and that necessary for
    electrical work. That meter and two minutes will provide numbers so
    that your replies may be even more informative. The procedure and
    minimum acceptable voltage numbers are in "When your computer dies
    without warning....." starting 6 Feb 2007 in the newsgroup
    alt.windows-xp at:
    http://tinyurl.com/yvf9vh
    Also pictures to better appreciate what you are measuring are:
    http://techrepublic.com.com/5102-10586-5566528.html
    http://www.helpwithpcs.com/courses/power-supply-basics-inc-pinouts.htm

    Your replies will only be as useful as numbers that you provide.
    Problems by shotgunning were demonstrated unreliable. Two minutes
    with the meter is a far more useful solution because it can also
    report things you were not aware of and were not mentioned by other
    speculative posts.
     
    w_tom, Jul 2, 2007
    #7
  8. w_tom wrote:
    <snip>
    > The meter is a $20 item even sold in K-mart, Sears, Wal-Mart, Lowes,
    > Radio Shack, Tru-Value Hardware, Home Depot ... almost everywhere that

    <snip>

    You want him to spend more on a multimeter than he's willing to spend on
    a power supply?
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jul 3, 2007
    #8
  9. Chicagorush

    w_tom Guest

    On Jul 2, 8:30 pm, Rôgêr <> wrote:
    > You want him to spend more on a multimeter than he's willing to spend on
    > a power supply?


    Did he spend money on tools such as a screwdriver? $20 for a tool
    as essential as a screwdriver ($10 if on sale) is money better spent
    than $60 for a power supply - especially when the existing power
    supply is only one of many suspects.

    If he does replace that power supply, he still needs numbers from
    the meter to confirm that power supply is working properly. It is
    common for some 500 watt power supplies to really only be 350 watts.
    They were not lying when claiming 500 watts - for reasons beyond the
    scope of this post.

    A second power supply has failed. Why? Reasons for a future
    problem could have been made obvious by a meter when new supply was
    installed. Just another reason why the meter is a smarter solution.

    Identify the suspect before replacing anything. Otherwise we will
    be having this same discussion again for a third power supply. We
    still don't even know what component is defective in a 'power supply'
    system. Replace a power supply without first learning with the meter
    - and a defective 'system' component remains to only fail again months
    later.
     
    w_tom, Jul 3, 2007
    #9
  10. Chicagorush

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > On Jul 2, 8:30 pm, Rôgêr <> wrote:
    > > You want him to spend more on a multimeter than he's willing to spend on
    > > a power supply?

    >
    > Did he spend money on tools such as a screwdriver? $20 for a tool
    > as essential as a screwdriver ($10 if on sale) is money better spent
    > than $60 for a power supply - especially when the existing power
    > supply is only one of many suspects.


    Most people have at least 1 screw driver already, not to mention that a
    screw driver requires no training, requires no real understanding,
    doesn't require you to understand the voltage levels based on the colors
    on the connectors, etc...

    A DVM can not tell the true cause of the computer failure, only give
    guesses in many case.

    >
    > If he does replace that power supply, he still needs numbers from
    > the meter to confirm that power supply is working properly. It is
    > common for some 500 watt power supplies to really only be 350 watts.
    > They were not lying when claiming 500 watts - for reasons beyond the
    > scope of this post.


    No you're being stupid - no home user is going to lookup the spec on his
    motherboard to determine the draw, then check all of the devices draws,
    then calculate the total current load, then put the meter in series with
    each different output to measure the load....

    If a quality PSU is purchased and it states 500W then it's going to
    provide 500W in most all cases - notice the "Quality" stipulation.

    > A second power supply has failed. Why? Reasons for a future
    > problem could have been made obvious by a meter when new supply was
    > installed. Just another reason why the meter is a smarter solution.


    And a meter will not help in this case, not at all. There are two things
    left, CPU and Motherboard, neither of which can be checked with a DVM.
    Even the Case Power button can be bypassed without a DVM, so, you can
    get all the way down to the PSU, Motherboard+CPU, without a DVM.

    > Identify the suspect before replacing anything. Otherwise we will
    > be having this same discussion again for a third power supply. We
    > still don't even know what component is defective in a 'power supply'
    > system.


    And without a DVM, by reasonable deduction, you can eliminate all the
    parts and more than a DVM could tell you, and you've not had to learn
    anything other than remove/swap this, get a new PSU, and you're 99%
    chance to be online and running without a DVM.

    > Replace a power supply without first learning with the meter
    > - and a defective 'system' component remains to only fail again months
    > later.


    And once it's up and running there is little chance that a DVM will be
    able to tell you anything unless you're going to try and understand
    current loads and how to measure current in a live power circuit.


    --
    Leythos - (remove 999 to email me)

    Learn more about PCBUTTS1 and his antics and ethic and his perversion
    with Porn and Filth. Just take a look at some of the FILTH he's created
    and put on his website: http://www.webservertalk.com/message1907860.html
    3rd link shows what he's exposed to children (the link I've include does
    not directly display his filth). You can find the same information by
    googling for 'PCBUTTS1' and 'exposed to kids'.
     
    Leythos, Jul 3, 2007
    #10
  11. Chicagorush

    pcbutts1 Guest

    Leythos is a troll and you are wasting your time talking to him.


    --

    Newsgroup Trolls. Read about mine here http://www.pcbutts1.com/downloads
    The list grows. Leythos the stalker http://www.leythosthestalker.com, David
    H. Lipman, Max M Wachtell III aka What's in a Name?, Fitz,
    Rhonda Lea Kirk, Meat Plow, F Kwatu F, George Orwell



    "w_tom" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Jul 2, 8:30 pm, Rôgêr <> wrote:
    > You want him to spend more on a multimeter than he's willing to spend on
    > a power supply?


    Did he spend money on tools such as a screwdriver? $20 for a tool
    as essential as a screwdriver ($10 if on sale) is money better spent
    than $60 for a power supply - especially when the existing power
    supply is only one of many suspects.

    If he does replace that power supply, he still needs numbers from
    the meter to confirm that power supply is working properly. It is
    common for some 500 watt power supplies to really only be 350 watts.
    They were not lying when claiming 500 watts - for reasons beyond the
    scope of this post.

    A second power supply has failed. Why? Reasons for a future
    problem could have been made obvious by a meter when new supply was
    installed. Just another reason why the meter is a smarter solution.

    Identify the suspect before replacing anything. Otherwise we will
    be having this same discussion again for a third power supply. We
    still don't even know what component is defective in a 'power supply'
    system. Replace a power supply without first learning with the meter
    - and a defective 'system' component remains to only fail again months
    later.
     
    pcbutts1, Jul 3, 2007
    #11
  12. Chicagorush

    Leythos Guest

    In article <f6ccet$6fe$>, pcbutts1
    @leythosthestalker.com says...
    > Leythos is a troll and you are wasting your time talking to him.


    And you provide access to porn for children on your website - proof in
    my sig.

    --
    Leythos - (remove 999 to email me)

    Learn more about PCBUTTS1 and his antics and ethic and his perversion
    with Porn and Filth. Just take a look at some of the FILTH he's created
    and put on his website: http://www.webservertalk.com/message1907860.html
    3rd link shows what he's exposed to children (the link I've include does
    not directly display his filth). You can find the same information by
    googling for 'PCBUTTS1' and 'exposed to kids'.
     
    Leythos, Jul 3, 2007
    #12
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