power supply failure

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Derek McGrath, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. Hi
    My friend had his power supply fail on him.
    we replaced the broken 350watt one with a 235watt
    one. Everthing seemed fine.
    The next day he bought a new 350watt one and
    installed it.
    It only lasted a couple of minutes, so thinking it was
    a faulty one he got a replacement and installed this.
    It only lasted 1/2 hour.
    When they fail the computer shuts down but the green power light is still
    on, although the computer wont start.
    Can anyone help me with this problem as it is driving my friend nuts.

    Thanx

    Derek
     
    Derek McGrath, Feb 9, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Derek McGrath

    dadiOH Guest

    Derek McGrath wrote:
    > Hi
    > My friend had his power supply fail on him.
    > we replaced the broken 350watt one with a 235watt
    > one. Everthing seemed fine.
    > The next day he bought a new 350watt one and
    > installed it.
    > It only lasted a couple of minutes, so thinking it was
    > a faulty one he got a replacement and installed this.
    > It only lasted 1/2 hour.
    > When they fail the computer shuts down but the green power light is
    > still on, although the computer wont start.
    > Can anyone help me with this problem as it is driving my friend nuts.


    Tell your friend to check things other than the power supply. Like RAM
    and/or drives and connections thereto.


    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Feb 9, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Derek McGrath

    w_tom Guest

    If a power supply does not come with a long list of numeric
    specs, then we cannot even be sure it is 350 watts. These
    supplies are dumped into N America with higher profits by
    forgetting to include critical functions. For example, a
    completely failed supply must not damage computer components.
    However when selling to computer assemblers, it is profitable
    to forget this function. After all, these computer assemblers
    only use price as their only numerical specification. Many
    power supplies are therefore defective by design.

    A power supply that does not include essential functions
    must not even claim those functions exist. Therefore no
    numerical specifications. No such specs - then suspect the
    worst.

    Is the supply defective, or is is just grossly undersized?
    350 watt supply should be more then enough power. A least
    expensive and only conclusive method to answer you mystery is
    to obtain the 3.5 digit multimeter and perform two minutes of
    measurements listed in two discussions. Yes it takes tens of
    times longer to read than it takes to obtain numbers from that
    meter. However to answer your questions immediately, get the
    meter, take the readings, and have answers without further
    adieu.
    "Computer doesnt start at all" in alt.comp.hardware on 10
    Jan 2004 at
    http://tinyurl.com/2t69q and
    "I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
    Feb 2004 at
    http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa


    Derek McGrath wrote:
    > Hi
    > My friend had his power supply fail on him.
    > we replaced the broken 350watt one with a 235watt
    > one. Everthing seemed fine.
    > The next day he bought a new 350watt one and
    > installed it.
    > It only lasted a couple of minutes, so thinking it was
    > a faulty one he got a replacement and installed this.
    > It only lasted 1/2 hour.
    > When they fail the computer shuts down but the green power light
    > is still on, although the computer wont start.
    > Can anyone help me with this problem as it is driving my friend
    > nuts.
    >
    > Thanx
    >
    > Derek
     
    w_tom, Feb 9, 2005
    #3
  4. Derek McGrath

    Guest

    On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 00:00:52 GMT, "Derek McGrath"
    <> wrote:

    |> Hi
    |> My friend had his power supply fail on him.
    |> we replaced the broken 350watt one with a 235watt
    |> one. Everthing seemed fine.
    |> The next day he bought a new 350watt one and
    |> installed it.
    |> It only lasted a couple of minutes, so thinking it was
    |> a faulty one he got a replacement and installed this.
    |> It only lasted 1/2 hour.
    |> When they fail the computer shuts down but the green power light is still
    |> on, although the computer wont start.
    |> Can anyone help me with this problem as it is driving my friend nuts.

    Interesting article on power supplies
    http://www.trustedreviews.com/article.aspx?art=1014

    It's being slashdot'd right now might take some time to load.

    --
     
    , Feb 9, 2005
    #4
  5. Derek McGrath

    w_tom Guest

    Considering how little so many computer assembler know about
    power supplies, then the cited study is a massive improvement
    at:
    http://www.trustedreviews.com/article.aspx?art=1014

    But again, it demonstrates a problem. For example, one
    power supply is called excessively noisy. How noisy? Where
    are the numbers? And does the actual noise agree with the
    specs provided by that manufacturer.

    Another supply is said to be more efficient. How
    efficient? If they measured the numbers, then replace the
    word 'better' with the number.

    Unfortunately the article claims they tested these power
    supplies to obtain the numbers. Then provide those numbers -
    both what the manufacturer claims and what they actually
    measured. For example, a power supply, to meet the specified
    wattage must exceed that wattage. Which power supplies worked
    up to 105%, 110%, and 120% of rating? Where are the numbers?

    It is a better article than what most computer assemblers
    cite. At least the review is not based upon junk science
    reasoning. But still, the information provided is woefully
    insufficient to select a power supply. Most damning fact -
    missing essential numbers.

    Another example: we don't care what the physical size of
    that power supply fan is. We care about what it does. That
    means they cite both from the manufacturer specs AND what is
    measured the two important numbers for fans: dB of noise and
    CFM. And when the manufacturer fails to provide those
    essential numbers, then the review has a big negative for that
    manufacturer. This would be a minimal requirement for the
    review. This cited power supply review does not do this for
    fans AND for most every other function the power supply should
    have been tested for.

    Another example: what happens when the power supply is
    overloaded AND is shorted. Does it fail or does it protect
    itself (as all power supplies must do). Just another function
    that all power supplies must provide, must be listed in
    manufacturer specs, AND that any minimal review would
    confirm. This review does not even try even though they had
    the necessary equipment to perform such tests.

    Why did they not even provide minimal information? Probably
    because they are reviewing for people who call themselves
    computer experts but don't even know how electricity works?
    This information is so basic simple that it could even be
    learned from those simple paper back booklets sold in Radio
    Shack. The review did not even demonstrate technical
    knowledge that minimal.

    The Intel specs call for a minimum power supply efficiency.
    What does not meet Intel specs is declared sufficient in this
    article. Again, this is why we always want numbers. Many
    power supply manufacturers fear we demand that because they
    are making so much money selling supplies that are missing
    critical functions. Some of those most critical functions
    were not even discussed in this marginal review from
    www.trustedreviews.com .

    wrote:
    > Interesting article on power supplies
    > http://www.trustedreviews.com/article.aspx?art=1014
    >
    > It's being slashdot'd right now might take some time to load.
     
    w_tom, Feb 9, 2005
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Silverstrand

    HEC Ace Power 580UB 580Watt power supply

    Silverstrand, Jul 23, 2005, in forum: Front Page News
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    851
    Silverstrand
    Jul 23, 2005
  2. nick
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,371
  3. jimz

    Power supply failure

    jimz, Oct 19, 2006, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    464
    Peter H. Coffin
    Oct 19, 2006
  4. Replies:
    6
    Views:
    739
    kaiaroo
    Apr 13, 2006
  5. MF

    Unusual Power Supply Failure

    MF, Feb 24, 2005, in forum: A+ Certification
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    639
Loading...

Share This Page