Power Pack Temperature

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Stuart, Feb 11, 2004.

  1. Stuart

    Stuart Guest

    I am thinking of reducing the noise output of my computer by altering the
    voltage supply to the cooling fan of the Power Pack from the 12V supply to
    the 5V supply. Obviously this will reduce the fan speed and the cooling
    ability of that fan, hence the Power Pack will run a little hotter, It is my
    understanding that a higher temperature within the power pack may lead to a
    less stable voltage.

    What implications may this have on the general running of the computer.?

    By the term "Power Pack" I am refering to the computers main transformer
    that reduces the mains voltage to 12V &5V
     
    Stuart, Feb 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. Stuart

    chip_y2kuk Guest

    "Stuart" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am thinking of reducing the noise output of my computer by altering the
    > voltage supply to the cooling fan of the Power Pack from the 12V supply to
    > the 5V supply. Obviously this will reduce the fan speed and the cooling
    > ability of that fan, hence the Power Pack will run a little hotter, It is

    my
    > understanding that a higher temperature within the power pack may lead to

    a
    > less stable voltage.
    >
    > What implications may this have on the general running of the computer.?
    >
    > By the term "Power Pack" I am refering to the computers main transformer
    > that reduces the mains voltage to 12V &5V
    >


    1. Computers are alergic to heat as most of the chips are sillicon based!

    2. the CPU (proccessor) is usually very close to the PSU (power supply) so
    heat from the PSU may create more heat for the CPU

    3. The PSU powers the whole of your PC and gets hot when demanding things
    are happening so this will create more heat from the PSU to the rest of the
    system

    4. the general rule i have noticed is that system heat = less stability
    sometimes even causing lock ups/crashes for no apparent reason. and most if
    not all motherboards have built in Heat sensors to prevent damage to the
    processor so they shut off at a set temperature usually 80 degrees

    This is just my oppinion. Hope it helps!.
     
    chip_y2kuk, Feb 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Stuart

    Stuart Guest

    "chip_y2kuk" <> wrote in message
    news:4029fbb5@212.67.96.135...
    >
    > "Stuart" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > I am thinking of reducing the noise output of my computer by altering

    the
    > > voltage supply to the cooling fan of the Power Pack from the 12V supply

    to
    > > the 5V supply. Obviously this will reduce the fan speed and the cooling
    > > ability of that fan, hence the Power Pack will run a little hotter, It

    is
    > my
    > > understanding that a higher temperature within the power pack may lead

    to
    > a
    > > less stable voltage.
    > >
    > > What implications may this have on the general running of the computer.?
    > >
    > > By the term "Power Pack" I am refering to the computers main transformer
    > > that reduces the mains voltage to 12V &5V
    > >

    >
    > 1. Computers are alergic to heat as most of the chips are sillicon based!
    >
    > 2. the CPU (proccessor) is usually very close to the PSU (power supply) so
    > heat from the PSU may create more heat for the CPU
    >
    > 3. The PSU powers the whole of your PC and gets hot when demanding things
    > are happening so this will create more heat from the PSU to the rest of

    the
    > system


    The PSU is well above the CPU / Motherboiard so there is no heating issue!


    > 4. the general rule i have noticed is that system heat = less stability
    > sometimes even causing lock ups/crashes for no apparent reason. and most

    if
    > not all motherboards have built in Heat sensors to prevent damage to the
    > processor so they shut off at a set temperature usually 80 degrees
    >


    The cooling of the CPU would not be affected, just the cooling of the PSU.
    So although your reply was well meaning and I thank you for that, you failed
    to address my question, what effect will a less stable power supply to the
    CPU have on the main parts of the computer.
    i.e. My computer is (atleast so far) working as normal with the reduced
    cooling of the PSU, I would like to know what will be the first signs that
    my experiment is failing?
     
    Stuart, Feb 11, 2004
    #3
  4. Stuart

    chip_y2kuk Guest

    "Stuart" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "chip_y2kuk" <> wrote in message
    > news:4029fbb5@212.67.96.135...
    > >
    > > "Stuart" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > I am thinking of reducing the noise output of my computer by altering

    > the
    > > > voltage supply to the cooling fan of the Power Pack from the 12V

    supply
    > to
    > > > the 5V supply. Obviously this will reduce the fan speed and the

    cooling
    > > > ability of that fan, hence the Power Pack will run a little hotter, It

    > is
    > > my
    > > > understanding that a higher temperature within the power pack may lead

    > to
    > > a
    > > > less stable voltage.
    > > >
    > > > What implications may this have on the general running of the

    computer.?
    > > >
    > > > By the term "Power Pack" I am refering to the computers main

    transformer
    > > > that reduces the mains voltage to 12V &5V
    > > >

    > >
    > > 1. Computers are alergic to heat as most of the chips are sillicon

    based!
    > >
    > > 2. the CPU (proccessor) is usually very close to the PSU (power supply)

    so
    > > heat from the PSU may create more heat for the CPU
    > >
    > > 3. The PSU powers the whole of your PC and gets hot when demanding

    things
    > > are happening so this will create more heat from the PSU to the rest of

    > the
    > > system

    >
    > The PSU is well above the CPU / Motherboiard so there is no heating issue!
    >
    >
    > > 4. the general rule i have noticed is that system heat = less stability
    > > sometimes even causing lock ups/crashes for no apparent reason. and most

    > if
    > > not all motherboards have built in Heat sensors to prevent damage to the
    > > processor so they shut off at a set temperature usually 80 degrees
    > >

    >
    > The cooling of the CPU would not be affected, just the cooling of the PSU.
    > So although your reply was well meaning and I thank you for that, you

    failed
    > to address my question, what effect will a less stable power supply to the
    > CPU have on the main parts of the computer.
    > i.e. My computer is (atleast so far) working as normal with the reduced
    > cooling of the PSU, I would like to know what will be the first signs that
    > my experiment is failing?
    >
    >

    your first sign of your experiment failling would probably be increased
    crashs caused by increased heat the PSU being less stable could be feeding
    the extra power to other parts of the computer these "spikes" arent good for
    any electrical appliance and they are horendous for computer parts but there
    is aways a little feedback and so one but the increase could just be enough.
    The other will be the above mentioned most if not ll motherboards will shut
    off if the temperature around the processor gets too hot some also have
    other areas that will cause the system to shut off like system temp which is
    a sensor away from the processor that monitors the general temperature of
    your system if one of these hits trigger levels the system will just turn
    off


    this also depends on the age of your system motherboard and processor et etc

    Hope this helps! and sorry for not answering your Question first time!
     
    chip_y2kuk, Feb 11, 2004
    #4
  5. On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 11:07:42 +0000, Stuart wrote:

    >
    > "chip_y2kuk" <> wrote in message
    > news:4029fbb5@212.67.96.135...
    >>
    >> "Stuart" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > I am thinking of reducing the noise output of my computer by altering

    > the
    >> > voltage supply to the cooling fan of the Power Pack from the 12V supply

    > to
    >> > the 5V supply. Obviously this will reduce the fan speed and the cooling
    >> > ability of that fan, hence the Power Pack will run a little hotter, It

    > is
    >> my
    >> > understanding that a higher temperature within the power pack may lead

    > to
    >> a
    >> > less stable voltage.
    >> >
    >> > What implications may this have on the general running of the computer.?
    >> >
    >> > By the term "Power Pack" I am refering to the computers main transformer
    >> > that reduces the mains voltage to 12V &5V
    >> >

    >>
    >> 1. Computers are alergic to heat as most of the chips are sillicon based!
    >>
    >> 2. the CPU (proccessor) is usually very close to the PSU (power supply) so
    >> heat from the PSU may create more heat for the CPU
    >>
    >> 3. The PSU powers the whole of your PC and gets hot when demanding things
    >> are happening so this will create more heat from the PSU to the rest of

    > the
    >> system

    >
    > The PSU is well above the CPU / Motherboiard so there is no heating issue!
    >
    >
    >> 4. the general rule i have noticed is that system heat = less stability
    >> sometimes even causing lock ups/crashes for no apparent reason. and most

    > if
    >> not all motherboards have built in Heat sensors to prevent damage to the
    >> processor so they shut off at a set temperature usually 80 degrees
    >>

    >
    > The cooling of the CPU would not be affected, just the cooling of the PSU.
    > So although your reply was well meaning and I thank you for that, you failed
    > to address my question, what effect will a less stable power supply to the
    > CPU have on the main parts of the computer.
    > i.e. My computer is (atleast so far) working as normal with the reduced
    > cooling of the PSU, I would like to know what will be the first signs that
    > my experiment is failing?


    Suggest you get a couple of multi-meters, hook them up to the PSU. Then
    you'll know if your experiment is working or not.

    --
    Michael Turner
     
    michael turner, Feb 11, 2004
    #5
  6. Stuart

    ICee Guest

    Stuart wrote:
    > I am thinking of reducing the noise output of my computer by altering
    > the voltage supply to the cooling fan of the Power Pack from the 12V
    > supply to the 5V supply. Obviously this will reduce the fan speed
    > and the cooling ability of that fan, hence the Power Pack will run a
    > little hotter, It is my understanding that a higher temperature
    > within the power pack may lead to a less stable voltage.
    >
    > What implications may this have on the general running of the
    > computer.?
    >
    > By the term "Power Pack" I am refering to the computers main
    > transformer that reduces the mains voltage to 12V &5V


    As the temperature inside the power supply goes up, the current output
    goes down. If it's a 300 watt PSU, for example, the output at a higher
    temperature may be only 200 watts, and the system may suffer
    intermittent problems/reboots at least, and shutdowns/damage to
    components at worst. Generic PSU's have less tolerance for heat
    extremes than do more expensive "name brand" PSU's.
     
    ICee, Feb 11, 2004
    #6
  7. Stuart

    Steve Knight Guest


    >i.e. My computer is (atleast so far) working as normal with the reduced
    >cooling of the PSU, I would like to know what will be the first signs that
    >my experiment is failing?
    >


    the computer will be off and the power light will blink and that's all she wrote
    time for a new power supply (G)

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
    Steve Knight, Feb 12, 2004
    #7
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