Power OFF Sequence, Win XP Home

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Jeff Strickland, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. I just upgraded a ME machine to XP Home. During Power OFF, the screen tells
    me to not unplug or turn off, the machine will do this automatically. But,
    when the time comes to actually shut down, the screen reports that it is now
    safe to turn the machine off.

    Why doesn't the machine shut off on its own?

    Its a Celeron 700, and the fact tht it was a Mellineum machine says it is
    rather old, but it seems like the technology to shut down through software
    should be there.

    Thanks,
     
    Jeff Strickland, Feb 22, 2008
    #1
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  2. Jeff Strickland

    sandy58 Guest

    On Feb 22, 9:10 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    > I just upgraded a ME machine to XP Home. During Power OFF, the screen tells
    > me to not unplug or turn off, the machine will do this automatically. But,
    > when the time comes to actually shut down, the screen reports that it is now
    > safe to turn the machine off.
    >
    > Why doesn't the machine shut off on its own?
    >
    > Its a Celeron 700, and the fact tht it was a Mellineum machine says it is
    > rather old, but it seems like the technology to shut down through software
    > should be there.
    >
    > Thanks,



    Start>Control panel>
     
    sandy58, Feb 22, 2008
    #2
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  3. Jeff Strickland

    sandy58 Guest

    On Feb 22, 10:47 pm, sandy58 <> wrote:
    > On Feb 22, 9:10 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    >
    > > I just upgraded a ME machine to XP Home. During Power OFF, the screen tells
    > > me to not unplug or turn off, the machine will do this automatically. But,
    > > when the time comes to actually shut down, the screen reports that it is now
    > > safe to turn the machine off.

    >
    > > Why doesn't the machine shut off on its own?

    >
    > > Its a Celeron 700, and the fact tht it was a Mellineum machine says it is
    > > rather old, but it seems like the technology to shut down through software
    > > should be there.

    >
    > > Thanks,

    >
    > Start>Control panel>


    Start>control panel>display>Screen saver>power>"never" in all three
    boxes.
    Click on "Hibernate" & uncheck if necessary.
    Hope this helps. :) Sorry about the "false start".
     
    sandy58, Feb 22, 2008
    #3
  4. "sandy58" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Feb 22, 10:47 pm, sandy58 <> wrote:
    >> On Feb 22, 9:10 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > I just upgraded a ME machine to XP Home. During Power OFF, the screen
    >> > tells
    >> > me to not unplug or turn off, the machine will do this automatically.
    >> > But,
    >> > when the time comes to actually shut down, the screen reports that it
    >> > is now
    >> > safe to turn the machine off.

    >>
    >> > Why doesn't the machine shut off on its own?

    >>
    >> > Its a Celeron 700, and the fact tht it was a Mellineum machine says it
    >> > is
    >> > rather old, but it seems like the technology to shut down through
    >> > software
    >> > should be there.

    >>
    >> > Thanks,

    >>
    >> Start>Control panel>

    >
    > Start>control panel>display>Screen saver>power>"never" in all three
    > boxes.
    > Click on "Hibernate" & uncheck if necessary.
    > Hope this helps. :) Sorry about the "false start".




    One of us does not understand my problem.

    I click Start>Shut Down, (whatever the clicks are) and the machine begins to
    shut down the open programs, etc., and eventually loads any pending updates
    that have not loaded, then proceeds to the actual shut down. It never
    actually shuts down, and instead it displays a message that tells me it is
    safe to depress the button on the tower to kill the power.

    All of my machines will physically shut off the power and go dead all by
    themselves, but this machine belongs to a friend whom I loaded XP for. Why
    doesn't my frined's machine shut down on command, instead of telling me that
    it is now okay to press the button?
     
    Jeff Strickland, Feb 23, 2008
    #4
  5. Jeff Strickland

    Paul Guest

    Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >
    > "sandy58" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Feb 22, 10:47 pm, sandy58 <> wrote:
    >>> On Feb 22, 9:10 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> > I just upgraded a ME machine to XP Home. During Power OFF, the
    >>> screen > tells
    >>> > me to not unplug or turn off, the machine will do this
    >>> automatically. > But,
    >>> > when the time comes to actually shut down, the screen reports that
    >>> it > is now
    >>> > safe to turn the machine off.
    >>>
    >>> > Why doesn't the machine shut off on its own?
    >>>
    >>> > Its a Celeron 700, and the fact tht it was a Mellineum machine says
    >>> it > is
    >>> > rather old, but it seems like the technology to shut down through >
    >>> software
    >>> > should be there.
    >>>
    >>> > Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Start>Control panel>

    >>
    >> Start>control panel>display>Screen saver>power>"never" in all three
    >> boxes.
    >> Click on "Hibernate" & uncheck if necessary.
    >> Hope this helps. :) Sorry about the "false start".

    >
    >
    >
    > One of us does not understand my problem.
    >
    > I click Start>Shut Down, (whatever the clicks are) and the machine
    > begins to shut down the open programs, etc., and eventually loads any
    > pending updates that have not loaded, then proceeds to the actual shut
    > down. It never actually shuts down, and instead it displays a message
    > that tells me it is safe to depress the button on the tower to kill the
    > power.
    >
    > All of my machines will physically shut off the power and go dead all by
    > themselves, but this machine belongs to a friend whom I loaded XP for.
    > Why doesn't my frined's machine shut down on command, instead of telling
    > me that it is now okay to press the button?
    >


    So the power supply is ignoring the signal to shut off ?

    Does the power supply behave correctly when the computer is
    first switched on at the back ? I.e. The computer doesn't
    actually run until you press the front power button ? The
    front button is called "soft power", because a logic signal
    is sent by the motherboard, to the power supply, to tell it
    to turn on the main outputs. So you want the front power
    button, to be in control of changing the state of the power
    supply.

    Another possibility, is the HAL used for the OS install on the
    computer, is not set up for ACPI. Open Device Manager, and
    look at the "Computer" entry. Mine says "ACPI Multiprocessor PC",
    while an older single core processor might show "ACPI Uniprocessor PC".
    If it shows "Standard PC", and the word ACPI is not there, then
    seeing that message on the screen might make more sense (safe
    to shut down, comes with "Standard PC").

    This web site claims this is the image seen when the OS uses APM,
    and then you do a manual shutdown. This one uses the "Standard PC" HAL
    for the Computer entry in Device Manager. I seem to remember a
    different looking picture on my Win98 PC.

    "Microsoft Windows - It is now safe to turn off your computer."
    http://wiki.ked-net.com/Files/Userfiles/Image/Wiki/Disableing_HAL_Windows_Setup/Shutdown.png

    When you are prompted that it is "safe to turn off..."
    via that screen message, does pressing the front button
    to turn it off work ? Or is the only way to turn it off,
    via the back switch ?

    I'm trying to distinguish here, between an OS install
    problem, versus a hardware, power switch or power supply
    type problem.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 23, 2008
    #5
  6. "Paul" <> wrote in message news:fpoj2f$1h4$...
    > Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>
    >> "sandy58" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On Feb 22, 10:47 pm, sandy58 <> wrote:
    >>>> On Feb 22, 9:10 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> > I just upgraded a ME machine to XP Home. During Power OFF, the
    >>>> screen > tells
    >>>> > me to not unplug or turn off, the machine will do this
    >>>> automatically. > But,
    >>>> > when the time comes to actually shut down, the screen reports that
    >>>> it > is now
    >>>> > safe to turn the machine off.
    >>>>
    >>>> > Why doesn't the machine shut off on its own?
    >>>>
    >>>> > Its a Celeron 700, and the fact tht it was a Mellineum machine says
    >>>> it > is
    >>>> > rather old, but it seems like the technology to shut down through >
    >>>> software
    >>>> > should be there.
    >>>>
    >>>> > Thanks,
    >>>>
    >>>> Start>Control panel>
    >>>
    >>> Start>control panel>display>Screen saver>power>"never" in all three
    >>> boxes.
    >>> Click on "Hibernate" & uncheck if necessary.
    >>> Hope this helps. :) Sorry about the "false start".

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> One of us does not understand my problem.
    >>
    >> I click Start>Shut Down, (whatever the clicks are) and the machine begins
    >> to shut down the open programs, etc., and eventually loads any pending
    >> updates that have not loaded, then proceeds to the actual shut down. It
    >> never actually shuts down, and instead it displays a message that tells
    >> me it is safe to depress the button on the tower to kill the power.
    >>
    >> All of my machines will physically shut off the power and go dead all by
    >> themselves, but this machine belongs to a friend whom I loaded XP for.
    >> Why doesn't my frined's machine shut down on command, instead of telling
    >> me that it is now okay to press the button?
    >>

    >
    > So the power supply is ignoring the signal to shut off ?
    >


    Yes, exactly.


    > Does the power supply behave correctly when the computer is
    > first switched on at the back ? I.e. The computer doesn't
    > actually run until you press the front power button ? The
    > front button is called "soft power", because a logic signal
    > is sent by the motherboard, to the power supply, to tell it
    > to turn on the main outputs. So you want the front power
    > button, to be in control of changing the state of the power
    > supply.
    >


    Yes, the front power button works properly. I must hold the button for
    several seconds, which is a fail-safe that prevents accidental improper
    power down.


    > Another possibility, is the HAL used for the OS install on the
    > computer, is not set up for ACPI. Open Device Manager, and
    > look at the "Computer" entry. Mine says "ACPI Multiprocessor PC",
    > while an older single core processor might show "ACPI Uniprocessor PC".
    > If it shows "Standard PC", and the word ACPI is not there, then
    > seeing that message on the screen might make more sense (safe
    > to shut down, comes with "Standard PC").
    >


    This sounds like a BIOS selection, is that right? If it is in the BIOS, I
    will find an option to change the setting, if not in the BIOSA, there will
    be no option, is that right? I looked in the BIOS, but did not know exactly
    what I was looking for, and do not recall a setting like the ones you
    mentioned.


    > This web site claims this is the image seen when the OS uses APM,
    > and then you do a manual shutdown. This one uses the "Standard PC" HAL
    > for the Computer entry in Device Manager. I seem to remember a
    > different looking picture on my Win98 PC.
    >
    > "Microsoft Windows - It is now safe to turn off your computer."
    > http://wiki.ked-net.com/Files/Userfiles/Image/Wiki/Disableing_HAL_Windows_Setup/Shutdown.png
    >


    That is the statement I get ...


    > When you are prompted that it is "safe to turn off..."
    > via that screen message, does pressing the front button
    > to turn it off work ? Or is the only way to turn it off,
    > via the back switch ?
    >


    Yes, it works fine. It is the means of shutting down. I am asking why this
    step is not performed automatically, without user participation in the shut
    down sequence.


    > I'm trying to distinguish here, between an OS install
    > problem, versus a hardware, power switch or power supply
    > type problem.
    >
    > Paul


    Perhaps the mother board does not comply the standard that makes the feature
    work. I'm not thinking it is broken, I'm thinking it is either an option
    that is not enabled, or a feature that is not available.

    Keep in mind, ME did not support complete machine shut down, it only closed
    all Windows operations and advised the user when this was complete, then
    posted a message that the power switch could be used. Since ME did not
    support the same functionality as XP, then it makes sense that ME machines
    would not have the BIOS setting to enable and disable the feature.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Feb 23, 2008
    #6
  7. Jeff Strickland

    Paul Guest

    Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >
    > "Paul" <> wrote in message news:fpoj2f$1h4$...
    >> Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "sandy58" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> On Feb 22, 10:47 pm, sandy58 <> wrote:
    >>>>> On Feb 22, 9:10 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> > I just upgraded a ME machine to XP Home. During Power OFF, the
    >>>>> screen > tells
    >>>>> > me to not unplug or turn off, the machine will do this
    >>>>> automatically. > But,
    >>>>> > when the time comes to actually shut down, the screen reports that
    >>>>> it > is now
    >>>>> > safe to turn the machine off.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> > Why doesn't the machine shut off on its own?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> > Its a Celeron 700, and the fact tht it was a Mellineum machine says
    >>>>> it > is
    >>>>> > rather old, but it seems like the technology to shut down through >
    >>>>> software
    >>>>> > should be there.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> > Thanks,
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Start>Control panel>
    >>>>
    >>>> Start>control panel>display>Screen saver>power>"never" in all three
    >>>> boxes.
    >>>> Click on "Hibernate" & uncheck if necessary.
    >>>> Hope this helps. :) Sorry about the "false start".
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> One of us does not understand my problem.
    >>>
    >>> I click Start>Shut Down, (whatever the clicks are) and the machine
    >>> begins to shut down the open programs, etc., and eventually loads any
    >>> pending updates that have not loaded, then proceeds to the actual
    >>> shut down. It never actually shuts down, and instead it displays a
    >>> message that tells me it is safe to depress the button on the tower
    >>> to kill the power.
    >>>
    >>> All of my machines will physically shut off the power and go dead all
    >>> by themselves, but this machine belongs to a friend whom I loaded XP
    >>> for. Why doesn't my frined's machine shut down on command, instead of
    >>> telling me that it is now okay to press the button?
    >>>

    >>
    >> So the power supply is ignoring the signal to shut off ?
    >>

    >
    > Yes, exactly.
    >
    >
    >> Does the power supply behave correctly when the computer is
    >> first switched on at the back ? I.e. The computer doesn't
    >> actually run until you press the front power button ? The
    >> front button is called "soft power", because a logic signal
    >> is sent by the motherboard, to the power supply, to tell it
    >> to turn on the main outputs. So you want the front power
    >> button, to be in control of changing the state of the power
    >> supply.
    >>

    >
    > Yes, the front power button works properly. I must hold the button for
    > several seconds, which is a fail-safe that prevents accidental improper
    > power down.
    >
    >
    >> Another possibility, is the HAL used for the OS install on the
    >> computer, is not set up for ACPI. Open Device Manager, and
    >> look at the "Computer" entry. Mine says "ACPI Multiprocessor PC",
    >> while an older single core processor might show "ACPI Uniprocessor PC".
    >> If it shows "Standard PC", and the word ACPI is not there, then
    >> seeing that message on the screen might make more sense (safe
    >> to shut down, comes with "Standard PC").
    >>

    >
    > This sounds like a BIOS selection, is that right? If it is in the BIOS,
    > I will find an option to change the setting, if not in the BIOSA, there
    > will be no option, is that right? I looked in the BIOS, but did not know
    > exactly what I was looking for, and do not recall a setting like the
    > ones you mentioned.
    >
    >
    >> This web site claims this is the image seen when the OS uses APM,
    >> and then you do a manual shutdown. This one uses the "Standard PC" HAL
    >> for the Computer entry in Device Manager. I seem to remember a
    >> different looking picture on my Win98 PC.
    >>
    >> "Microsoft Windows - It is now safe to turn off your computer."
    >> http://wiki.ked-net.com/Files/Userfiles/Image/Wiki/Disableing_HAL_Windows_Setup/Shutdown.png
    >>
    >>

    >
    > That is the statement I get ...
    >
    >
    >> When you are prompted that it is "safe to turn off..."
    >> via that screen message, does pressing the front button
    >> to turn it off work ? Or is the only way to turn it off,
    >> via the back switch ?
    >>

    >
    > Yes, it works fine. It is the means of shutting down. I am asking why
    > this step is not performed automatically, without user participation in
    > the shut down sequence.
    >
    >
    >> I'm trying to distinguish here, between an OS install
    >> problem, versus a hardware, power switch or power supply
    >> type problem.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > Perhaps the mother board does not comply the standard that makes the
    > feature work. I'm not thinking it is broken, I'm thinking it is either
    > an option that is not enabled, or a feature that is not available.
    >
    > Keep in mind, ME did not support complete machine shut down, it only
    > closed all Windows operations and advised the user when this was
    > complete, then posted a message that the power switch could be used.
    > Since ME did not support the same functionality as XP, then it makes
    > sense that ME machines would not have the BIOS setting to enable and
    > disable the feature.
    >


    I had something similar happen on one of my PCs. What happened was,
    at the moment I went to install the OS, the BIOS was "not ACPI
    compliant". (Later BIOS updates, were compliant. But with my luck,
    I had the one that was broken.) The ACPI stuff failed to install,
    and the OS installer made some mention of it, but I probably wasn't
    really paying attention. I ended up with a "Standard PC" HAL, so I
    was always greeted with the "safe to turn off" thing, followed by
    me having to press the button. So, as far as I know, ACPI is what
    enables the function automatically.

    So, your first mission, is to confirm that the Computer entry in
    Device Manager is "Standard PC".

    Fixing that, is not easy. Some HAL transitions are automated, and
    the OS does them without a fuss. For example, if I disable
    Hyperthreading in the BIOS, the OS notices I no longer have one
    physical and one virtual CPU on my P4. The HAL will shift to
    "ACPI Uniprocessor PC". Later, if I go into the BIOS and re-enable
    Hyperthreading, it shifts back to "ACPI Multiprocessor PC". The
    two share a lot in common.

    "Standard PC" on the other hand, has no ACPI stuff. I don't think
    there is an easy way to go from there to "ACPI Multiprocessor PC".

    Before trying to install the OS the next time, I'd check the
    BIOS and make sure ACPI is enabled. Some BIOS offer the option to
    enable the 2.0 standard for ACPI, and I guess that would be a
    good option as well. There is also an option that can be there,
    for S1 or S3, which are ACPI states. S3 is "suspend to RAM", which
    is something I use all the time. If that isn't set right in the
    BIOS, when the OS is installed, that can be fixed later with the
    Microsoft "dumppo" utility. Dumppo has an option for
    "administrative override", and can fix it.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 23, 2008
    #7
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