power connectors - too few?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Johnny8977, Sep 8, 2004.

  1. Johnny8977

    Johnny8977 Guest

    Hi all.

    I've just bought a new case to go with a new graphics card (9800 Pro).

    The case has 4 fans and the card also needs to be attached to the PSU. The
    PSU is 400W.

    Now, coming from the PSU there are only 2 sets of those 4 pin connectors,
    one with 2 connectors along it and the other with 1, so could drive 3 things
    by default.

    Am I OK linking up a series of these as the connectors on the fans and
    graphics card have a male and female connector.

    So, the set with 2 by default goes - connectors split to drive a fan and DVD
    drive, and the other to drive another fan and CD RW.

    The wire with one connector by default is split to drive a fan and then to
    the HDD and graphics card.

    Is this how its done and does this even make sense?
     
    Johnny8977, Sep 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Johnny8977

    Rob Morley Guest

    In article <413e3e1e$0$68713$>,
    "Johnny8977" ***NOSPAM*** says...
    > Hi all.
    >
    > I've just bought a new case to go with a new graphics card (9800 Pro).
    >
    > The case has 4 fans and the card also needs to be attached to the PSU. The
    > PSU is 400W.
    >
    > Now, coming from the PSU there are only 2 sets of those 4 pin connectors,
    > one with 2 connectors along it and the other with 1, so could drive 3 things
    > by default.
    >
    > Am I OK linking up a series of these as the connectors on the fans and
    > graphics card have a male and female connector.
    >
    > So, the set with 2 by default goes - connectors split to drive a fan and DVD
    > drive, and the other to drive another fan and CD RW.
    >
    > The wire with one connector by default is split to drive a fan and then to
    > the HDD and graphics card.
    >
    > Is this how its done and does this even make sense?
    >

    Yes. Yes. :)
    Just be sure that all the connections are good - sometimes the quality
    of the connectors on fans is a bit sub-optimal. In fact I'd be a bit
    dubious of the quality of the PSU if they're cutting corners on
    connectors like that - it may _say_ that it provides 400W to ATX
    specification, but ...
     
    Rob Morley, Sep 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Rob Morley wrote:
    > In article <413e3e1e$0$68713$>,
    > "Johnny8977" ***NOSPAM*** says...
    >> Hi all.


    >> I've just bought a new case to go with a new graphics card (9800 Pro).


    >> The case has 4 fans and the card also needs to be attached to the PSU. The
    >> PSU is 400W.


    >> Now, coming from the PSU there are only 2 sets of those 4 pin connectors,
    >> one with 2 connectors along it and the other with 1, so could drive 3 things
    >> by default.


    >> Am I OK linking up a series of these as the connectors on the fans and
    >> graphics card have a male and female connector.


    >> So, the set with 2 by default goes - connectors split to drive a fan and DVD
    >> drive, and the other to drive another fan and CD RW.


    >> The wire with one connector by default is split to drive a fan and then to
    >> the HDD and graphics card.


    >> Is this how its done and does this even make sense?


    > Yes. Yes. :)
    > Just be sure that all the connections are good - sometimes the quality
    > of the connectors on fans is a bit sub-optimal. In fact I'd be a bit
    > dubious of the quality of the PSU if they're cutting corners on
    > connectors like that - it may _say_ that it provides 400W to ATX
    > specification, but ...


    I wondered about that, too, Rob. OP: what's the brand and model of this PS?
    Was it the one that came with a cheapo case?

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263

    Go Blue
     
    Blinky the Shark, Sep 8, 2004
    #3
  4. Johnny8977

    Johnny8977 Guest


    >
    >> Yes. Yes. :)
    >> Just be sure that all the connections are good - sometimes the quality
    >> of the connectors on fans is a bit sub-optimal. In fact I'd be a bit
    >> dubious of the quality of the PSU if they're cutting corners on
    >> connectors like that - it may _say_ that it provides 400W to ATX
    >> specification, but ...

    >
    > I wondered about that, too, Rob. OP: what's the brand and model of this
    > PS?
    > Was it the one that came with a cheapo case?
    >
    > --
    > Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    >
    > Go Blue




    It came with the case, yes. It's the same brand as case - ICute.

    I do realise that while it says 400W this is a maximum and cannot be
    sustained.
     
    Johnny8977, Sep 8, 2004
    #4
  5. Johnny8977

    RubbishRat Guest

    "Johnny8977" <***NOSPAM***> wrote in message
    news:413e3e1e$0$68713$...
    > Hi all.
    >
    > I've just bought a new case to go with a new graphics card (9800 Pro).
    >
    > The case has 4 fans and the card also needs to be attached to the PSU. The
    > PSU is 400W.
    >
    > Now, coming from the PSU there are only 2 sets of those 4 pin connectors,
    > one with 2 connectors along it and the other with 1, so could drive 3

    things
    > by default.
    >
    > Am I OK linking up a series of these as the connectors on the fans and
    > graphics card have a male and female connector.
    >
    > So, the set with 2 by default goes - connectors split to drive a fan and

    DVD
    > drive, and the other to drive another fan and CD RW.
    >
    > The wire with one connector by default is split to drive a fan and then to
    > the HDD and graphics card.
    >
    > Is this how its done and does this even make sense?



    You should be OK just using splitters, but if you're worried about the
    output of your new PSU and you have space inside your case, you always have
    the option of using your old power supply as well as the main one. just
    connect two of the blacks together (ground) and link the two greens together
    (power on) . My main computer has been quite happy with this arrangement for
    many years now. Two 300W PSU's give you a total output of 600W for next to
    nothing.
    Pete
     
    RubbishRat, Sep 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Johnny8977

    Rob Morley Guest

    In article <413f080a$0$22758$>, "RubbishRat"
    says...
    >
    > "Johnny8977" <***NOSPAM***> wrote in message
    > news:413e3e1e$0$68713$...
    > > Hi all.
    > >
    > > I've just bought a new case to go with a new graphics card (9800 Pro).
    > >
    > > The case has 4 fans and the card also needs to be attached to the PSU. The
    > > PSU is 400W.
    > >
    > > Now, coming from the PSU there are only 2 sets of those 4 pin connectors,
    > > one with 2 connectors along it and the other with 1, so could drive 3

    > things
    > > by default.
    > >
    > > Am I OK linking up a series of these as the connectors on the fans and
    > > graphics card have a male and female connector.
    > >
    > > So, the set with 2 by default goes - connectors split to drive a fan and

    > DVD
    > > drive, and the other to drive another fan and CD RW.
    > >
    > > The wire with one connector by default is split to drive a fan and then to
    > > the HDD and graphics card.
    > >
    > > Is this how its done and does this even make sense?

    >
    >
    > You should be OK just using splitters, but if you're worried about the
    > output of your new PSU and you have space inside your case, you always have
    > the option of using your old power supply as well as the main one. just
    > connect two of the blacks together (ground) and link the two greens together
    > (power on) . My main computer has been quite happy with this arrangement for
    > many years now. Two 300W PSU's give you a total output of 600W for next to
    > nothing.


    Seems to me you need to make sure that you don't end up connecting them
    together (by, for instance, powering the mobo from one PSU and the
    auxiliary power on the VGA from the other) or you could end up with some
    interesting feedback on the voltage control circuitry.
     
    Rob Morley, Sep 8, 2004
    #6
  7. Johnny8977

    Alex Fraser Guest

    "Johnny8977" <***NOSPAM***> wrote in message
    news:413ec687$0$33790$...
    > I do realise that while it says 400W this is a maximum and cannot be
    > sustained.


    On the contrary, it *should* be sustainable.

    Alex
     
    Alex Fraser, Sep 8, 2004
    #7
  8. Johnny8977

    RubbishRat Guest


    >
    > Seems to me you need to make sure that you don't end up connecting them
    > together (by, for instance, powering the mobo from one PSU and the
    > auxiliary power on the VGA from the other) or you could end up with some
    > interesting feedback on the voltage control circuitry.


    I use one PSU for the Mainboard only and the other does all the disk drives,
    No problems at all. I agree that a bit of sense is required, I don't
    recommend you link any of the feeds for instance as they are regulated
    individually and they will only argue if you connect them together, but as
    most tower cases have loads of wasted space I think on balance it's a simple
    solution to a common problem.
    Pete
     
    RubbishRat, Sep 8, 2004
    #8
  9. Johnny8977

    Graham W Guest

    "Rob Morley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <413f080a$0$22758$>, "RubbishRat"
    > says...
    > >
    > > "Johnny8977" <***NOSPAM***> wrote in message
    > > news:413e3e1e$0$68713$...
    > > > Hi all.
    > > >
    > > > I've just bought a new case to go with a new graphics card (9800

    Pro).
    > > >
    > > > The case has 4 fans and the card also needs to be attached to the

    PSU. The
    > > > PSU is 400W.
    > > >
    > > > Now, coming from the PSU there are only 2 sets of those 4 pin

    connectors,
    > > > one with 2 connectors along it and the other with 1, so could drive

    3
    > > things
    > > > by default.
    > > >
    > > > Am I OK linking up a series of these as the connectors on the fans

    and
    > > > graphics card have a male and female connector.
    > > >
    > > > So, the set with 2 by default goes - connectors split to drive a fan

    and
    > > DVD
    > > > drive, and the other to drive another fan and CD RW.
    > > >
    > > > The wire with one connector by default is split to drive a fan and

    then to
    > > > the HDD and graphics card.
    > > >
    > > > Is this how its done and does this even make sense?

    > >
    > >
    > > You should be OK just using splitters, but if you're worried about the
    > > output of your new PSU and you have space inside your case, you always

    have
    > > the option of using your old power supply as well as the main one.

    just
    > > connect two of the blacks together (ground) and link the two greens

    together
    > > (power on) . My main computer has been quite happy with this

    arrangement for
    > > many years now. Two 300W PSU's give you a total output of 600W for

    next to
    > > nothing.

    >
    > Seems to me you need to make sure that you don't end up connecting them
    > together (by, for instance, powering the mobo from one PSU and the
    > auxiliary power on the VGA from the other) or you could end up with some
    > interesting feedback on the voltage control circuitry.


    Not sure what you mean here by 'voltage control circuitry', Rob. Whilst
    industrial power supplies have remote sensing so that the desired
    voltage is obtained at the far (load) end of the wiring, PC PSUs don't.


    --
    Graham W http://www.gcw.org.uk/ PGM-FI page updated, Graphics Tutorial
    WIMBORNE http://www.wessex-astro-society.freeserve.co.uk/ Wessex
    Dorset UK Astro Society's Web pages, Info, Meeting Dates, Sites & Maps
    Change 'news' to 'sewn' in my Reply address to avoid my spam filter.
     
    Graham W, Sep 9, 2004
    #9
  10. Johnny8977

    Rob Morley Guest

    In article <413fbd0d$0$30680$>,
    "Graham W" LID says...
    <snip>
    >
    > Not sure what you mean here by 'voltage control circuitry', Rob. Whilst
    > industrial power supplies have remote sensing so that the desired
    > voltage is obtained at the far (load) end of the wiring, PC PSUs don't.
    >

    Maybe cheap'n'nasty ones don't, but the one in this machine uses voltage
    feedback - unless Antec are lying, of course.

    http://www.antec.com/us/productDetails.php?ProdID=20430
     
    Rob Morley, Sep 9, 2004
    #10
  11. Johnny8977

    Graham W Guest

    Rob Morley wrote:
    > In article <413fbd0d$0$30680$>,
    > "Graham W" LID says...
    > <snip>
    >>
    >> Not sure what you mean here by 'voltage control circuitry', Rob.
    >> Whilst industrial power supplies have remote sensing so that the
    >> desired voltage is obtained at the far (load) end of the wiring, PC
    >> PSUs don't.
    >>

    > Maybe cheap'n'nasty ones don't, but the one in this machine uses
    > voltage feedback - unless Antec are lying, of course.
    >
    > http://www.antec.com/us/productDetails.php?ProdID=20430


    I think that is a half truth. The 20-way connector of the ATX PSU
    has no provision for remote sensing so the only thing I can think of
    is that they are running a sense wire alongside the power wire and
    crimping it into the same plug pin. If you have such a PSU you'll
    easily see if that is the case - or not (my bet!).

    An alternative interpretation is that they are saying that each voltage
    supply in the PSU is an independant circuit so that load on one
    rail won't affect the output of another. I don't think their claim extends
    outside of the PSU case.

    I had a quick scurry round the Intel site to find the ATX spec and failed
    but I did find 4615.pdf which annotates the pin functions of the 20-way
    connector together with a load of others. There are no feedback pins.


    --
    Graham W http://www.gcw.org.uk/ PGM-FI page updated, Graphics Tutorial
    WIMBORNE http://www.wessex-astro-society.freeserve.co.uk/ Wessex
    Dorset UK Astro Society's Web pages, Info, Meeting Dates, Sites & Maps
    Change 'news' to 'sewn' in my Reply address to avoid my spam filter.
     
    Graham W, Sep 9, 2004
    #11
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