POTS and VOIP line switching/device sharing

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by Jeff Kowalski, Jan 2, 2005.

  1. I'm looking to share a single-line phone automatically across two lines
    (a VoIP line and a POTS line), and am looking for devices with this
    support.

    The most uncomfortable thing I find about VoIP presently is the
    limitation of 911 service (http://slate.com/Default.aspx?id=2106424&).
    You cannot simply dial and hang up, you must wait to leave your
    location (in contrast to landline service which requires only the call
    to connect). And of course if the VoIP provider, the internet, or
    power are interrupted, 911 on VoIP will be unavailable. With a small
    kid, guests in the house while I'm away, etc., I feel more comfortable
    with a phone system that doesn't carry caveats and works as one has
    come to expect when one has come to expect it to work.
    Consequently, I've kept my landline, stripped of features, for the
    express purpose of dialing 911.
    I'm now looking for a solution which will bind my landline and my VoIP
    line into one single line phone. I've got only single line phones in
    my house now, and replacing them with two line phones would eliminate
    the cost benefits of switching to VoIP in the first place. My second
    guiding principle therefore is to not outlay more money than I'm
    saving.
    Here's my ideal setup: I'd connect both incoming lines to some box
    which also has a single output to a telephone. When a call comes in to
    either line, the phone will ring, and on pickup it'll be attached to
    the active line while the other line is simultaneously placed off hook
    to generate a busy signal should someone call on that other line. The
    two incoming lines would operate completely symmetrically. When
    placing outgoing calls, lifting the receiver should by default attach
    to the land line (again busying the other VoIP line). If however, I
    dial a prefix (typically something line #0), the outgoing call would
    swap to VoIP and busy the landline. Power outages should affect only
    the ability to select the VoIP line, although it's permitted that the
    "busy the other line" function might be unavailable; in other words,
    even during a power failure, I should get a straight connection from my
    phone to landline for incoming and outgoing calls.
    These features of the solution would permit me to make calls on VoIP
    with only a small change in behavior (adding the prefix), and
    importantly permit use of the landline with absolutely no change in
    behavior, satisfying my initial goal.

    I've found a few of these boxes, but none of them are perfect. Here's
    what my research has uncovered:
    1. http://www.artech.com.tw/html/english/ax520/Ax520.htm
    An interesting choice. On the plus side, it approximates what I want
    somewhat closely, and could be quite cheap (<$50). However, when the
    power goes out, it defaults to the formerly prefixed number. In other
    words, if you dial #0 to get VoIP, then when the power goes out, you
    get the VoIP line by default with no prefix and can no longer get to
    the landline. If you connect it the other way, then you'd get landline
    during power outages automatically, but would be required to dial #0 to
    get it otherwise. There's no configuration that permits you to get to
    911 universally with no extra digits. Perhaps there's some hardware
    hacking possible. Unfortunately, the company is in Taiwan with
    distributors only in France, from what I can tell:
    http://www.cazenave.fr/freebox/
    http://www.boxtoo.com/
    Interestingly, the French have apparently been doing this for a while.
    Most of the sites I've found on this topic are in French, but maybe
    because the search terms I'm using are located in the French posts.
    There may be German folks, for instance who are active in the area but
    using other terms, presumably German.
    2.
    http://natcomm.com.au/america/index.cfm?page=product_details&id=37&product_id=37
    Looks good, but appears to be in Australia. AUD 116 translates to
    USD$90, a bit steep, and that's before shipping.
    3. http://www.testequipmentdepot.com/skutch/telecomacc/as50.htm
    Good again, but man it's expensive. $200.
    4. http://yellowbox.free.fr/
    A build-it-yourself version, but requires a manual switch to select the
    alternate line. The device will not be conveniently placed, so I've
    got to have one that permits line selection from the handset.

    Have any of you looked to solve the same problem? What solutions did
    you investigate and what did you finally implement?


    jeff
    Jeff Kowalski, Jan 2, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jeff Kowalski

    Martin² Guest

    Draytek Vigor 2500V router has VoIP phone socket (2600V has two), which can
    connect to the POTS line, and in case of power failure default to the POTS
    line.
    Martin², Jan 3, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Thanks, Martin. That's a great suggestion for folks who are looking to
    start from scratch and have the option to select their router. In my
    case, though, I've already got a VoIP router - a Linksys PAP2, which
    has only two outbound FXS ports and of course the ethernet port; no
    support for incoming POTS. It was free, so I can't complain about the
    lack of this specific feature I want.

    What I'm looking for is something that I can attach "after" the VoIP
    router to automatically switch between the FXS line and a POTS line.
    Of course, the source nature of the lines doesn't matter much - I could
    equally well be switching between two POTS lines.

    BTW, I forgot to clearly mention in the original post: manually
    operated devices won't work for me since the idea is to centrally
    locate this to serve my whole house. Since the device will be
    inaccessible, it's got to be automatic.

    I would have thought that this application would be very common, and am
    surprised that it's been so hard to find solutions in scouring the web.
    Perhaps I'm one of very few out there who are looking to bind two
    phone lines into a single device in this manner,
    Jeff Kowalski, Jan 3, 2005
    #3
  4. Jeff Kowalski

    p Guest

    In article ID <>, "Jeff
    Kowalski" <> writes:

    >I'm looking to share a single-line phone automatically across two lines
    >(a VoIP line and a POTS line), and am looking for devices with this
    >support.


    I realize after reading your posts, that you have a locked device you want to
    do this with. I am only aware of a device that does this with a POTS line and
    an open BYOD provider, the Sipura 3000. Includes free service too. But, it
    appears you've already done your research and came up with some devices that
    might fit the bill. AAMOF, this might not even be what you are looking for at
    all!

    http://store.voxilla.com/customer/product.php?productid=16144&cat=0&page=



    The SPA-3000 features VoIP adapter functionality found in Sipura's wildly
    successful SPA-2000 and SPA-1000, with the additional benefit of an integral
    connection for legacy telephone network "hop-on, hop-off" applications.


    SPA-3000 users will be able to leverage their broadband phone service
    connections more than ever by automatically routing local calls from cell
    phones and land lines to a VoIP service provider and vice versa.

    A typical user calling from a land line or mobile phone can reduce - and even
    eliminate - international and long distance telephone charges by first calling
    their SPA-3000 via a local phone number or by using a telephone connected
    directly to the unit. The advanced authentication and call routing
    intelligence programmed into the SPA-3000 connects the caller via the Internet
    to the far end destination with security and ease.

    At the far end, calls can be answered immediately or further processed as a
    local call to any legacy land line or mobile phone allowed by the SPA-3000
    dial plan.

    The SPA-3000 may also be used for life line applications. For example,
    depending on the service provider’s set-up, callers who dial 911 can be
    automatically routed via the IP or legacy telephone network.

    If power is lost to the unit or the VoIP service is down, calls will still be
    sent to a traditional carrier via the FXO interface. Sipura is currently
    working with several service providers to further define requirements for life
    line support in products such as the SPA-3000.

    In addition to the hundreds of programmable features available with VoIP phone
    adapter functionality, the SPA-3000 provides specific features to allow calls
    to be routed to and from the FXO interface. Some of the features available on
    the SPA-3000 include:


    Multiple, Configurable Dial Plans Activated for Individual or Groups of Users;
    Single and Dual Stage Dialing;
    FXO / VoIP Line Sharing.


    Bonus:

    Sipura SPA-3000s purchased from Voxilla include the following:

    One free month, with all activation fees waived, of any Broadvoice's unlimited
    plan, including "Unlimited World Plus";

    Up to 100 free calling minutes through iConnectHere;

    One free month, with activation fee waived, of VoicePulse unlimited US-48
    calling (US residents only, see Terms and Conditions );

    Access to Voxilla's Sipura user group forums for technical support.
    Quantity Discounts:


    Price: $ 99.95
    p, Jan 3, 2005
    #4
  5. Jeff Kowalski

    Ivor Jones Guest

    Jeff Kowalski wrote:
    > I'm looking to share a single-line phone automatically across two
    > lines (a VoIP line and a POTS line), and am looking for devices
    > with this support.


    I'm curious - is there a specific reason why you can't/won't use two
    separate phones or a 2-line phone..?

    Ivor
    Ivor Jones, Jan 3, 2005
    #5
  6. Ivor,

    Good questions.

    I'm not interested in buying two line phones to replace the single line
    ones I have (5 of them) in the house since that would cost more than
    I'm saving on switching to VoIP.

    Placing pairs of single line phones around the house is what I'm
    presently doing, but it's inconvenient and inelegant. Also, it doesn't
    solve my problem of providing 911 emergency service "without thinking".
    With separate phones as you suggest, there's a 50% probability of
    picking up the wrong phone to dial 911.

    Has anyone used any of the hardware devices I mentioned in this
    thread's original message?

    jeff
    Jeff Kowalski, Jan 3, 2005
    #6
  7. Jeff Kowalski

    Dmitri Guest

    Jeff Kowalski wrote:


    > What I'm looking for is something that I can attach "after"
    > the VoIP
    > router to automatically switch between the FXS line and a POTS line.
    > Of course, the source nature of the lines doesn't matter much - I could
    > equally well be switching between two POTS lines.


    Hi Jeff,

    If a 911 call is your concern, then a VoIP router with a fallback POTS
    line will not help you much: what if someone broke into your house, but
    the power is still ON? The call is still going to go through the VoIP
    line.
    It looks like what you need is a small PBX that can support least cost
    routing, which you can program in such way that if "911" is dialed, it
    hits POTS trunk, no matter what the status of the power is.

    I can't really come up with a suggestion on equipment that is capable of
    least cost routing, but is affordable enough for a residential install
    though. Maybe a used Magix?

    Good luck!


    --
    Dmitri Abaimov, RCDD
    http://www.cabling-design.com
    Cabling Forum, color codes, pinouts and other useful resources for
    premises cabling users and pros
    http://www.cabling-design.com/homecabling
    Residential Cabling Guide
    -------------------------------------



    ##-----------------------------------------------##
    Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archive
    http://www.cabling-design.com/forums
    no-spam read and post WWW interface to your favorite newsgroup -
    comp.dcom.voice-over-ip - 1597 messages and counting!
    ##-----------------------------------------------##
    Dmitri, Jan 3, 2005
    #7
  8. Jeff Kowalski

    Marc H.Popek Guest

    There is a <25 dollar solution called combine-a-line. It automatically
    connects SINGLE line telephone gear (handset, answering machine etc) too two
    lines. it can be two phone line or a phone line and a voip port. This
    device will meet your needs at a fraction of two line telephones or other
    bridging devices.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=5741954675&ssPageNam
    e=STRK:MESE:IT

    Marco


    "Jeff Kowalski" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm looking to share a single-line phone automatically across two lines
    > (a VoIP line and a POTS line), and am looking for devices with this
    > support.
    >
    > The most uncomfortable thing I find about VoIP presently is the
    > limitation of 911 service (http://slate.com/Default.aspx?id=2106424&).
    > You cannot simply dial and hang up, you must wait to leave your
    > location (in contrast to landline service which requires only the call
    > to connect). And of course if the VoIP provider, the internet, or
    > power are interrupted, 911 on VoIP will be unavailable. With a small
    > kid, guests in the house while I'm away, etc., I feel more comfortable
    > with a phone system that doesn't carry caveats and works as one has
    > come to expect when one has come to expect it to work.
    > Consequently, I've kept my landline, stripped of features, for the
    > express purpose of dialing 911.
    > I'm now looking for a solution which will bind my landline and my VoIP
    > line into one single line phone. I've got only single line phones in
    > my house now, and replacing them with two line phones would eliminate
    > the cost benefits of switching to VoIP in the first place. My second
    > guiding principle therefore is to not outlay more money than I'm
    > saving.
    > Here's my ideal setup: I'd connect both incoming lines to some box
    > which also has a single output to a telephone. When a call comes in to
    > either line, the phone will ring, and on pickup it'll be attached to
    > the active line while the other line is simultaneously placed off hook
    > to generate a busy signal should someone call on that other line. The
    > two incoming lines would operate completely symmetrically. When
    > placing outgoing calls, lifting the receiver should by default attach
    > to the land line (again busying the other VoIP line). If however, I
    > dial a prefix (typically something line #0), the outgoing call would
    > swap to VoIP and busy the landline. Power outages should affect only
    > the ability to select the VoIP line, although it's permitted that the
    > "busy the other line" function might be unavailable; in other words,
    > even during a power failure, I should get a straight connection from my
    > phone to landline for incoming and outgoing calls.
    > These features of the solution would permit me to make calls on VoIP
    > with only a small change in behavior (adding the prefix), and
    > importantly permit use of the landline with absolutely no change in
    > behavior, satisfying my initial goal.
    >
    > I've found a few of these boxes, but none of them are perfect. Here's
    > what my research has uncovered:
    > 1. http://www.artech.com.tw/html/english/ax520/Ax520.htm
    > An interesting choice. On the plus side, it approximates what I want
    > somewhat closely, and could be quite cheap (<$50). However, when the
    > power goes out, it defaults to the formerly prefixed number. In other
    > words, if you dial #0 to get VoIP, then when the power goes out, you
    > get the VoIP line by default with no prefix and can no longer get to
    > the landline. If you connect it the other way, then you'd get landline
    > during power outages automatically, but would be required to dial #0 to
    > get it otherwise. There's no configuration that permits you to get to
    > 911 universally with no extra digits. Perhaps there's some hardware
    > hacking possible. Unfortunately, the company is in Taiwan with
    > distributors only in France, from what I can tell:
    > http://www.cazenave.fr/freebox/
    > http://www.boxtoo.com/
    > Interestingly, the French have apparently been doing this for a while.
    > Most of the sites I've found on this topic are in French, but maybe
    > because the search terms I'm using are located in the French posts.
    > There may be German folks, for instance who are active in the area but
    > using other terms, presumably German.
    > 2.
    >

    http://natcomm.com.au/america/index.cfm?page=product_details&id=37&product_i
    d=37
    > Looks good, but appears to be in Australia. AUD 116 translates to
    > USD$90, a bit steep, and that's before shipping.
    > 3. http://www.testequipmentdepot.com/skutch/telecomacc/as50.htm
    > Good again, but man it's expensive. $200.
    > 4. http://yellowbox.free.fr/
    > A build-it-yourself version, but requires a manual switch to select the
    > alternate line. The device will not be conveniently placed, so I've
    > got to have one that permits line selection from the handset.
    >
    > Have any of you looked to solve the same problem? What solutions did
    > you investigate and what did you finally implement?
    >
    >
    > jeff
    >



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    Marc H.Popek, Jan 3, 2005
    #8
  9. Jeff Kowalski

    Dmitri Guest

    Marc H.Popek wrote:

    > There is a <25 dollar solution called combine-a-line. It
    > automatically
    > connects SINGLE line telephone gear (handset, answering machine etc)
    > too two
    > lines. it can be two phone line or a phone line and a voip port. This
    > device will meet your needs at a fraction of two line telephones or
    > other
    > bridging devices.


    > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=5741954675&ssPageNam
    > e=STRK:MESE:IT


    > Marco


    How do you control which line is picked up first? The device isnt' going
    to know that 911 call should go to line "2" all the time, is it?


    --
    Dmitri Abaimov, RCDD
    http://www.cabling-design.com
    Cabling Forum, color codes, pinouts and other useful resources for
    premises cabling users and pros
    http://www.cabling-design.com/homecabling
    Residential Cabling Guide
    -------------------------------------



    ##-----------------------------------------------##
    Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archive
    http://www.cabling-design.com/forums
    no-spam read and post WWW interface to your favorite newsgroup -
    comp.dcom.voice-over-ip - 1606 messages and counting!
    ##-----------------------------------------------##
    Dmitri, Jan 3, 2005
    #9
  10. Thanks for the reply, Marc. In fact, I've seen you've often taken the
    opportunity to promote this device you sell. It appears that outgoing
    call paths are manually selected, however, which doesn't suit my
    purposes at all as you'll see from the original and follow-up posts.
    jeff
    Jeff Kowalski, Jan 4, 2005
    #10
  11. Thanks for the thoughtful response, Dmitri. My initial post was
    probably fairly complicated and it may have been difficult to see how
    my request handled the situation you decribe. By default, picking up
    the phone will always give you the POTS line, unless you specifically
    dial the VoIP prefix to select that outgoing line. When power is ON,
    in your scenario, the call would therefore go out through POTS, not
    VoIP. When power is off, same thing, although you obviously wouldn't
    have the option of selecting VoIP because neither the VoIP router, nor
    this magic box I'm envisioning would be active.

    The Magix suggestion is a good one, but sounds pricey and complicated.
    I was really hoping for a simple, small standalone box (take a look at
    the skutch device whose link I referenced in the original post -
    something small like that). I could have sworn that Radio Shack sold
    these a decade or so ago, but can no longer find reference to it.

    jeff
    Jeff Kowalski, Jan 4, 2005
    #11
  12. "Jeff Kowalski" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ivor,
    >
    > Good questions.
    >
    > I'm not interested in buying two line phones to replace the single line
    > ones I have (5 of them) in the house since that would cost more than
    > I'm saving on switching to VoIP.
    >
    > Placing pairs of single line phones around the house is what I'm
    > presently doing, but it's inconvenient and inelegant. Also, it doesn't
    > solve my problem of providing 911 emergency service "without thinking".
    > With separate phones as you suggest, there's a 50% probability of
    > picking up the wrong phone to dial 911.
    >
    > Has anyone used any of the hardware devices I mentioned in this
    > thread's original message?


    Hi Jeff,

    I'm new to this game, I got broadband just before Christmas
    and decided to get a Zoom X5V router. I'm not sure what you
    mean by "a VoIP line" so this may not be of interest. It
    takes an adsl connection and a POTS line and provides a
    single phone output. This is from the datasheet:

    "The Local Phone port of the Model 5565 includes
    an intelligent relay that allows a single phone
    to place and receive both VoIP calls and calls
    over the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN).
    PSTN Fail-Over allows the X5v to automatically
    route calls over the dial-up phone network when
    power is lost. PSTN support also allows emergency
    dialing using services like 911 or 112 calling."

    ".. the Model 5565 lets you dial the call normally,
    and your call goes out through your local phone
    line to the traditional "public switched telephone
    network" or PSTN. When you want the call to go out
    over the Internet, you dial a # before dialing the
    person's phone number."

    Incoming calls on either line will ring the phone. That sounds
    like what you are asking for. The full datasheet is here:

    http://www.zoom.com/graphics/datasheets/adsl/ADSL_X5V_22645565.pdf

    It has a REN of 5 and I'm running 2 fixed phones, a cordless
    and a loud bell from it.

    I haven't checked how it works here in the UK as we use 999
    instead of 911 and I'm just getting to grips with it. The
    downsides I've found so far are no uPnP support and possibly
    a limited number of peering agreements with other suppliers.

    HTH
    George
    George Dishman, Jan 4, 2005
    #12
  13. Jeff Kowalski

    Martin² Guest

    >Zoom X5V router
    >"The Local Phone port of the Model 5565 includes

    an intelligent relay that allows a single phone
    to place and receive both VoIP calls and calls
    over the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN).
    PSTN Fail-Over allows the X5v to automatically
    route calls over the dial-up phone network when
    power is lost. PSTN support also allows emergency
    dialing using services like 911 or 112 calling."
    >When you want the call to go out

    over the Internet, you dial a # before dialing the
    person's phone number."

    That's exactly the same arrangement I mentioned earlier available on Draytek
    Vigor Voip routers
    models 2500V, 2600V (two VoIP ports), 2600GV (+wireless).

    I don't think Zoom has wireless routers.
    Regards,
    Martin
    Martin², Jan 5, 2005
    #13
  14. Jeff Kowalski

    Marc H.Popek Guest

    Hello group,

    The clt cannot know which line you want a priori' in most cases the voip
    crowd would like the unit to default to "line 1" which is the voip
    gateway... in the case of local mayhem the caller would like the pstn as the
    911 folks can instantly trace the local number to an address and react...

    currently the clt, will pick the outbound based upon the last line used,
    unless you push the little button and select the line you like. however in
    all cases the two lines are automatically 'joined" to your favorite single
    Telco devices.

    I use the devices on two pstn lines as I like the sound quality of my older
    ma bell single line phone , yet need two line access often. for the other
    locations two line phones have an unusually high premium associated. hence
    clt was born. I designed this beast before voip was popular. fortunately
    extra jacks were added allowing for uses (including voip) that were not
    contemplated yet today are the main basis for clt sales.

    At the time I had been freshly "ripped off" from vc firm that killed my
    prior endeavor and was anxious to "do it again" so I am a serial
    entrepreneur... I was thinking of using a "No vc dollars" used logo... but
    did not ....

    last one sold new unit at

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=5741954675&ssPageNam
    e=STRK:MESE:IT


    "Jeff Kowalski" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the reply, Marc. In fact, I've seen you've often taken the
    > opportunity to promote this device you sell. It appears that outgoing
    > call paths are manually selected, however, which doesn't suit my
    > purposes at all as you'll see from the original and follow-up posts.
    > jeff
    >



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    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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    Marc H.Popek, Jan 5, 2005
    #14
  15. "Martin²" <> wrote in message
    news:41db47c2$0$48129$...
    > >Zoom X5V router
    >>"The Local Phone port of the Model 5565 includes

    > an intelligent relay that allows a single phone
    > to place and receive both VoIP calls and calls
    > over the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN).
    > PSTN Fail-Over allows the X5v to automatically
    > route calls over the dial-up phone network when
    > power is lost. PSTN support also allows emergency
    > dialing using services like 911 or 112 calling."
    >>When you want the call to go out

    > over the Internet, you dial a # before dialing the
    > person's phone number."
    >
    > That's exactly the same arrangement I mentioned earlier available on
    > Draytek Vigor Voip routers
    > models 2500V, 2600V (two VoIP ports), 2600GV (+wireless).


    Sorry, I must have missed that, I didn't
    intend to clutter the group.

    > I don't think Zoom has wireless routers.


    No, but it's a lot cheaper :)

    I actually phoned a local Draytek supplier
    I've used before and asked if they could
    give me a good reason to buy their product
    instead of the Zoom. They hadn't heard of
    it and when we went through the specs, the
    only advatages were QoS and uPnP. The price
    was 50% higher so I couldn't really justify
    it.

    best regards
    George
    George Dishman, Jan 5, 2005
    #15
  16. Jeff Kowalski

    wkearney99 Guest

    > I realize after reading your posts, that you have a locked device you want
    to
    > do this with. I am only aware of a device that does this with a POTS line

    and
    > an open BYOD provider, the Sipura 3000.


    How well, if at all, does the Sipura 3000 intergrate with an asterix setup?
    wkearney99, Jan 6, 2005
    #16
  17. Jeff Kowalski

    Martin² Guest

    George
    >(Draytek) only advatages were QoS and uPnP


    QoS is important if you want to use VoIP and download at the same time.
    Regards,
    Martin
    Martin², Jan 6, 2005
    #17
  18. Jeff Kowalski

    p Guest

    In article ID <>, "wkearney99"
    <> writes:

    >> I realize after reading your posts, that you have a locked device you want

    >to
    >> do this with. I am only aware of a device that does this with a POTS line

    >and
    >> an open BYOD provider, the Sipura 3000.

    >
    >How well, if at all, does the Sipura 3000 intergrate with an asterix setup?


    I honestly have no experience with Asterik.It looks like it should work fine.

    http://asterisk.org/index.php?menu=hardware

    Internet LineJack Single FXS or FXO interface. Supports Linux telephony
    interface. DSP compression built-in.

    http://www.sipura.com/products/spa3000.htm

    1 port FXS and 1 port FXO.
    p, Jan 6, 2005
    #18
  19. "Martin²" <> wrote in message
    news:41dc990f$0$36639$...
    > George
    >>(Draytek) only advatages were QoS and uPnP

    >
    > QoS is important if you want to use VoIP and download at the same time.


    I thought about that but I'm not a gamer or use the
    net for music so I don't do many big downloads. My
    total usage is around 600Mb/month, mostly mail and
    newsgroups, though I've been downloading a lot of
    softphones lately ;-)

    If I find it's a problem, I'll upgrade to a Draytek
    but I guess it'll be many months until the VoIP
    traffic justifies it, I have to get my friends onto
    it first.

    best regards
    George
    George Dishman, Jan 6, 2005
    #19
  20. hosted voip softswitch

    Hello Group,

    Maybe one of you is interested:


    We provide a Turnkey VoIP solution for ITSP's including everything
    needed to start the business:

    1. SIP and H323 Softswitch with SIP <-> H323 translation, NAT traversal

    2. Real-time Billing (prepaid and postpaid)

    3. Hosting and internet bandwith

    4. PC2phone software with customization

    5. Web2phone

    6. Web, SMS, ANI, DID callback

    7. IVR for prepaid calling cards

    8. Callshop solution

    9. Referral to Tier1, Tier2, or Tier3 carriers for worldwide termination
    (if needed).


    Pricing of the package starts at $500/month.
    Robert Cabule, Feb 4, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

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