Possible to break into programming job with MCAD?

Discussion in 'MCAD' started by Jane, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. Jane

    Jane Guest

    I've been out of the work force for many years raising a
    family. Now that the youngest is heading off to school
    soon I want to go back to work. I minored in Computer
    Science ages ago (Liberal Arts major), and have used
    dBase and structured Basic programming ancillary to my
    main jobs over the years but have never worked as a
    programmer per se. I taught myself VBA and VB6 over the
    last couple of years "for fun," and I took a COM class
    (using VBA). If I get up to speed on vb.net and pass the
    MCAD, should I be able to find a job, or even break
    into .net temp work? TIA!
     
    Jane, Jun 16, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jane

    bb Guest

    Jane wrote:

    > I've been out of the work force for many years raising a
    > family. Now that the youngest is heading off to school
    > soon I want to go back to work. I minored in Computer
    > Science ages ago (Liberal Arts major), and have used
    > dBase and structured Basic programming ancillary to my
    > main jobs over the years but have never worked as a
    > programmer per se. I taught myself VBA and VB6 over the
    > last couple of years "for fun," and I took a COM class
    > (using VBA). If I get up to speed on vb.net and pass the
    > MCAD, should I be able to find a job, or even break
    > into .net temp work? TIA!


    i would personally recomend jumping ship from VB.NET to C#.

    whilst this may seem like an extra hurdle, its actually not that
    difficult (as moving from vb6 programming model to .net is more the
    challenge than learning the actual syntax)

    in my opinion c# is used much more heavily in the IT industry, but most
    importantly it means your learning a syntax very close to java and C++,
    thus widening your employment options.


    --
    ------------------------
    Think your smart?
    Prove your programming power @ the OSI Geek Challenges
    http://www.osix.net
    ------------------------
     
    bb, Jun 17, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jane

    Eric Guest

    bb wrote:

    > i would personally recomend jumping ship from VB.NET to C#.
    >
    > whilst this may seem like an extra hurdle, its actually not that
    > difficult (as moving from vb6 programming model to .net is more the
    > challenge than learning the actual syntax)
    >
    > in my opinion c# is used much more heavily in the IT industry, but
    > most importantly it means your learning a syntax very close to java
    > and C++, thus widening your employment options.


    I disagree. VB.NET is more common in entry level, and perhaps
    mid-level, jobs. This is especially true in jobs that involve building
    ASP.NET websites.

    C# is far more common than VB.NET at the senior level.

    Eric
     
    Eric, Jun 17, 2004
    #3
  4. Jane

    Guest Guest

    BB wrote:

    >i would personally recomend jumping ship from VB.NET to

    C#.
    >
    >whilst this may seem like an extra hurdle, its actually

    not that
    >difficult (as moving from vb6 programming model to .net

    is more the
    >challenge than learning the actual syntax)
    >
    >in my opinion c# is used much more heavily in the IT

    industry, but most
    >importantly it means your learning a syntax very close

    to java and C++,
    >thus widening your employment options.
    >


    Thank you very much! I've been interested in learning C#
    anyway, so I'll get right on it.
     
    Guest, Jun 18, 2004
    #4
  5. Jane

    Jane Guest

    >-----Original Message-----
    >bb wrote:
    >
    >> i would personally recomend jumping ship from VB.NET

    to C#.
    >>
    >> whilst this may seem like an extra hurdle, its

    actually not that
    >> difficult (as moving from vb6 programming model

    to .net is more the
    >> challenge than learning the actual syntax)
    >>
    >> in my opinion c# is used much more heavily in the IT

    industry, but
    >> most importantly it means your learning a syntax very

    close to java
    >> and C++, thus widening your employment options.

    >
    >I disagree. VB.NET is more common in entry level, and

    perhaps
    >mid-level, jobs. This is especially true in jobs that

    involve building
    >ASP.NET websites.
    >
    >C# is far more common than VB.NET at the senior level.
    >
    >Eric


    I am thinking on focusing on the Windows-based .net
    applications exams: 306 and 316 (plus 310).
     
    Jane, Jun 18, 2004
    #5
  6. Jane

    Diana Guest


    >-----Original Message-----
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>bb wrote:
    >>
    >>> i would personally recomend jumping ship from VB.NET

    >to C#.
    >>>
    >>> whilst this may seem like an extra hurdle, its

    >actually not that
    >>> difficult (as moving from vb6 programming model

    >to .net is more the
    >>> challenge than learning the actual syntax)
    >>>
    >>> in my opinion c# is used much more heavily in the IT

    >industry, but
    >>> most importantly it means your learning a syntax very

    >close to java
    >>> and C++, thus widening your employment options.

    >>
    >>I disagree. VB.NET is more common in entry level, and

    >perhaps
    >>mid-level, jobs. This is especially true in jobs that

    >involve building
    >>ASP.NET websites.
    >>
    >>C# is far more common than VB.NET at the senior level.
    >>
    >>Eric

    >
    >I am thinking on focusing on the Windows-based .net
    >applications exams: 306 and 316 (plus 310).
    >.



    You can't take both of these tests to get MCAD. You could
    take 306 with 305, or 316 with 316. I am trying to do
    exactly the same thing as you. I have been working in
    administration and decided that I would be better off as a
    programmer. I took classes in high school and am teaching
    myself VB.NET now. In my admin/assistant jobs I have
    created databases and web pages to help with my work, but
    never actually "programmed" either. Probably within a
    month I should finish up the MCAD tests (1 down, 2 more to
    go!).

    I think as far as getting a job, some of that depends on
    the area you live, and willingness to relocate, etc.
    Contact some recruiters and send them your resume when you
    get the certification, let them know you are looking for
    entry-level work. Also, send your resume to any IT
    company you can think of that is within your commuting
    range.

    Get as much practice as you can and make your resume look
    at IT-related as possible (highlight things like your
    certications, classes taken, programming languages that
    you know, any kind of programming you have done at jobs,
    etc.).

    I don't think it should matter which language you learn.
    I keep reading that even if one developer writes a class
    in C#, you can inherit that class and work with it in VB
    anyway. Is that right? So even if a job says they can a
    C# developer, shouldn't you be able to write your modules
    in VB and it all gets compiled correctly anyway?
     
    Diana, Jun 21, 2004
    #6
  7. Jane

    Eric Guest

    > I don't think it should matter which language you learn.

    I agree - C# is not better than VB.NET, or vice-versa. These languages
    are very similar in capabilities. The differences are mostly syntax
    issues.

    > I keep reading that even if one developer writes a class
    > in C#, you can inherit that class and work with it in VB
    > anyway. Is that right?


    yes. You can also call library modules written in the "other" language,
    and call Web Services, etc.

    > So even if a job says they can a
    > C# developer, shouldn't you be able to write your modules
    > in VB and it all gets compiled correctly anyway?


    You're correct, but you need to understand the corporate mindset. Most
    companies believe in standardizing on one language. They normally allow
    a small exception to the rule in some rare cases, but they try to keep
    most code in the same language.

    Some companies allow both C# or VB.NET, but I think that is not the
    norm.

    I recommend targeting your skills towards the jobs that you might
    qualify for. This is hard to do if you're not familier with the jobs in
    your area. I strongly recommend spending some time researching jobs in
    your city (or any city you might relocate to), and look for entry level
    jobs in VB.NET or C#. Use the big job search web sites, and specify the
    city and language, and see what comes up.

    Don't make the mistake of looking at the total number of job hits for
    C# vs. VB.NET. You need to narrow it down to entry level job offers.

    I prefer C# myself, but as I said in another message, I've guided my
    son towards VB.NET because that's where I see most of the entry level
    jobs. Another consideration is that he has some experience with VB6.

    You can rest assured that once you know either of these languages well,
    it's not hard to learn the other language. But focus on one language
    first and master it.

    Eric
     
    Eric, Jun 21, 2004
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Tech
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    442
  2. Beyonder
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    353
    Bruce Sinclair
    May 7, 2008
  3. George
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    666
    vivek
    Aug 9, 2005
  4. - Bobb -

    Youtube - easy way to break video into pieces ?

    - Bobb -, Jun 28, 2009, in forum: Computer Information
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    880
    - Bobb -
    Jun 28, 2009
  5. noauth
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    3,427
    John Hosking
    Aug 14, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page